Praise Hemp

There is something exciting on the horizon of equine nutrition. As a relatively new food to western cultures, hemp is a tiny seed with gigantic nutritional benefits. So why choose hemp for your equine? Hemp seeds are a nutrient dense, all natural, low processed, easily digested form of healthy fats ad and exceptional source of plant-based protein. Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s) are essential to tissue growth and help regulate many internal functions. EFA’s are by definition, essential because they can’t be produced by the body and must be obtained through diet for proper growth and body functioning.

Essential Amino Acids (EAA’s) are the building blocks found in protein and hemp offers an excellent protein quality which rivals many grains, as well as soy and whey. By supplementing hemp oil, topping and protein finer to our equine’s diet, you may notice an improvement in immune system, energy, digestion, skin and coat, mobility, muscle health and cardiovascular health.

Amanda Smith at the Calgary Wrangler Futurity. Photo by James Hudyma.

Western Horse Review recently got the chance to speak with cutter Amanda Smith of Wembley, AB. Smith has been using Praise Hemp products for the past year-and-a-half and loves the changes she has witnessed in one of her top competition geldings.

“I started giving it to my gelding that I show (Im Short And Smooth, aka ‘Fred’),” she explains. “Fred used to be spooky, nervous, lots of anxiety – he was wound pretty tight. I could tell a huge difference in Fred’s demeanor after two weeks of being on it. He was soft and quiet to be around and I could actually take him out on a trail ride and enjoy it! Plus he was super shiny. Once Fred had been on it for a couple of months and I noticed all the positives that came from it, I put the rest of our horses on it, along with the Praise Hemp Protein Fibre.”

Smith says that in her barn, her horses have all responded very well to the Praise Hemp products. The great thing for show horse owners is that horses will not test positive for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Praise Hemp’s Canadian hemp producers follow stringent guidelines under Health Canada’s Industrial Hemp Regulations. It is tested multiple times in the field and has virtually 0% THC. The company can even provide certificates of analysis to verify.

Additionally, horses enjoy the taste of Praise Hemp products.

“We don’t have a single horse that won’t eat it, they all love it!” says Smith. “What I’ve noticed the most across the board with all the horses is their body condition – they’re shiny and full. With the show horses I find they have more stamina and recover faster, they also maintain their weight throughout the show season.”

Smith also uses Praise Hemp products with her younger and breeding stock, including her broodmares. “All of our horses; weanlings, yearlings, show horses, broodmares and our stallion get both the Oil and Protein Fibre. My favourite thing about the product is that ALL our horses benefit from it!”

Amanda Smith. Photo by James Hudyma.

 

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For more information about Praise Hemp products, check out www.hempcocanada.com

Canadian Eh? 2017 Ladies of Canadian Pro Rodeo Fashion Show & Luncheon

This year the Ladies of Canadian Professional Rodeo celebrated Canada’s 150th Anniversary.

Each year during the Canadian Finals Rodeo in Edmonton, Alberta the Ladies of Canadian Professional Rodeo hosts a Luncheon & Fashion Show fundraiser. This year WHR was on hand at the event to witness all the fun and fashion that was had at the Canadian Eh? 2017 Ladies of Canadian Pro rodeo Fashion Show & Luncheon.

The luncheon & fashion show, a long time stand-out on the Canadian rodeo social scene, has generated over $291,000 to charitable causes. The funds raised by the event are distributed to the Cowboy Benefit Fund and the Canadian Pro Rodeo Sport Medicine Team (CPRSMT). The Cowboy Benefit Fund was established to provide emergency funding for Canadian Pro Rodeo Association members who are injured or placed in hardship due to injury. The fund relies on donations by rodeo fans, businesses and groups to maintain its resources. The CPRSMT plays an important role in and out of the rodeo arena, with their help rodeo athletes maintain a level of health in order to be better prepared to compete, reduce the effects of injuries and add longevity to their rodeo careers.

The event doubled as Miss Rodeo Canada 2017, Ali Mullin’s, final runway walk. Photo Credit: Classic Rodeo Boutique

Dr. Blaine Bugg, manager of the CPRSMT was on hand at the event, and took to the stage to commend the Ladies of Canadian Pro Rodeo for all the hard work they put into the luncheon and fashion show, and thanked them for their support. Another poignant moment came when Jim Nevada, of Roper Apparel and Footwear, took to the stage to introduce a memorial song to all the cowboys that were lost in 2017. With collaboration from Stacy Roper, Norm Swen and Don Johansen, and performed by Stacy Roper, Gord Bamford, and Duane Steele, the song was a beautiful tribute to the rodeo community. The luncheon serves many purposes, aside from raising money for great causes, it brings together the rodeo community for an afternoon of fun and fashion. There were lots of laughs around the room, and even more glitter and bling from the visiting rodeo queens from around Canada, and the world, including Miss Rodeo Australia, and Miss Rodeo Warwick.

Former Miss Rodeo Sundre, Kyla Williams, was in the running for Miss Rodeo Canada, and showed off a beautiful gown for her final walk. Photo Credit: Classic Rodeo Boutique.

Western fashion, with a Canadian twist, was the focus of the fashion show, with clothing provided by Roper and Wrangler through Lammles Western Wear and Tack. Audi Roy, of Classic Rodeo Boutique, was on hand to style and accessorize the outfits. The fashion show also shone a spotlight on the Miss Rodeo Canada pageant contestants who were vying for a chance to be crowned Miss Rodeo Canada 2018. Each of the five spectacular young women walked the stage in different fashions, while being evaluated for the final judged portion of pageant week before the crowning at the rodeo later in the evening. Despite what could be a nerve-wracking situation, all of the ladies were poised and beautiful as they made their way down the runway. Of course, Miss Rodeo Canada 2017, Ali Mullin, stole the show, as she sauntered down the runway for her final walk as Miss Rodeo Canada.

Former Miss Rodeo Medicine Hat, Brittney Chomistek, rocked fashion from Lammles Western Wear. Chomistek was crowned Miss Rodeo Canada 2018 later that evening at the CFR. Photo Credit: Classic Rodeo Boutique.

Overall the luncheon and fashion show was a massive success. Live music, entertainment and a delicious lunch was topped off with a fun fashion show, all while raising money for amazing causes within the rodeo community. If you have plans to head to CFR next year, make sure to put the Ladies of the Canadian Pro Rodeo Luncheon and Fashion show on your “to-do” last night, it’s a lot of fun – and for a great cause. What’s better than that?!

Former Calgary Stampede Princess, Lizzie Ryman, got a chance to catch up with the freshly crowned 2018 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio.

The Signs and Symptoms of PPID

Have you ever heard the term “Cushings”, and been unsure as to what that means? In reality it is Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID). Western Horse Review sat down with Dr. Doug Myers, a veterinarian from Boehringer Ingelheim Canada Ltd, to discuss PPID. PPID is a common condition of aged horses and as we learn more about the care and wellness of geriatric horses, increasing attention is being paid to the role of PPID in their lives.

Myers noted that recent study on PPID has suggested a link between horses and ponies that are afflicated with Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) developing PPID. It is now recommended that all horses with EMS over 10 years old be monitored for the signs of PPID.

These signs can include, but are not limited too, lethargy, loss of skeletal muscle mass, rounding of the abdomen, regional adiposity, abnormal sweating and laminitis.  The confirm PPID and assess the severity of the disease in your equine partner single sample resting Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (ACTH) testing is required. As with most things in the equine world, horses in the early stages of PPID are more of a challenge to diagnose and confirm. You may exhibit reduced performance, loss of muscle tone, or change of attitude. Other signs can include the horse taking a few weeks longer than normal to shed its winter hair coat.

Myers says, “In the fall of 2014, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd. embarked on a pilot project to test horses across Canada that their veterinarians suspected PPID. All horses had a single plasma sample run for resting ACTH levels. The majority of these samples were taken in October, 2014. This project as well as the follow up 2015 testing program was done in attempt to assist Canadian veterinarians diagnose PPID suspect horses for the owners. A positive diagnosis of PPID can assist the owner with commencing treatment with Pergolide mesythlate (Prascend- Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd.).”

He continues, “Of the 98 horses for which ACTH results were available in 2014, 55 (56%) had resting ACTH levels consistent with a diagnosis of PPID. Three horses (3%) had borderline resting ACTH levels (10.4-11.3 pmol/L), and forty horses had normal seasonally-adjusted ACTH concentrations (<10.4 pmol/L). Of the horses with PPID, 10% were less than ≤ 10 years of age.”

In 2015, the Canada wide PPID testing program was repeated with a total of 200 submissions. Multiple breeds, including pony, pony crosses, quarter horses, warm bloods, thoroughbreds and arabs were involved. Of the 198 horses with ACTH results available, 151 (76 %) had a test result consistent with a PPID diagnosis (> 11.3 pmol/L). Six horses (3 %) had borderline ACTH results (10-4-11.3 pmol/L) and 41 horses (21 %) had levels found to be within a normal seasonally adjusted ACTH concentration (< 10.4 pmol/L). The two highest resting ACTH levels found were both in Miniature horses, 600 and 420 pmol/L respectively. Furthermore, of the horses tested, 65 % were 16 years of age or older, 29 % were between 11-15 years old, and 6 % were 10 years of age or younger.

Veterinarians were asked to state what clinical signs the horse had that made a differential diagnosis of PPID a possibility. Many horses had more than one clinical sign that was indicative of PPID. The most common clinical sign noted was laminitis (often chronic) in 51 reported cases. Hair coat or shedding issues were the second most reported sign accounting for 39 cases. Other clinical signs of note included weight changes (increased or decreased) , lethargy, other causes of lameness and chronic infections.

When Canadian equine veterinarians selected clients horses they suspected may have PPID, they were correct the majority of the time. In 2014, 56 % of the cases selected were positive for PPID based on a resting ACTH submission, while in 2015, 76 % of the horses tested positive for PPID when evaluated using a resting ACTH test.

In summary, subtle changes to your horse’s appearance could signal something big. But identifying PPID early may help ensure a better quality of life for your horse. Visit www.bicanadaequine.ca to find out if your horse is eligible for a free PPID test from Boehringer Ingelheim, and to learn more about PPID.

2017 Canadian Champions Declared

Courtesy of the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association

The Champions of CFR 44. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

Edmonton, ALTA – November 12, 2017

It was simply a case of unfinished business. For Canadian team ropers Levi Simpson and Jeremy Buhler, CFR44 offered the opportunity to fulfill a dream that had been left incomplete up to now. While Ponoka, Alberta header, Simpson, had a Canadian championship to his credit, to go along with his 2016 World Champion buckle, heeling partner, Jeremy Buhler, was still looking for his first Canadian title. Despite a slow start to their CFR (they had two no times in the first three rounds), the duo blazed their way through Super Saturday with back to back 4.1 second go-round winning runs and added a 4.2 second run on Championship Sunday to emerge as victors.

“It was very exciting to follow up a ‘dream come true season winning the world’ to come back up here, finally have a good year to come in here number one then outlast everyone until the end and stay number one.”

Simpson and Buhler, who also finished fifth in the average, ended the season with $59,006 each for a comfortable margin over second place finishers Justin and Brett McCarroll.

Layton Green erupts from a chute on the final day of CFR 44. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

Another season leader who was able to win a Canadian title was saddle bronc rider Layton Green of Meeting Creek, Alberta. Green saw second place man – and reigning world champion – Zeke Thurston, make up considerable ground on this lead over the first three rounds. But the 23 year old Green turned things around for the last three rounds of CFR44 and restored his comfortable edge. What was an amazing year for the second generation cowboy ended with Green establishing a new saddle bronc season earnings record. He wrapped up the year with $107,363 to move past eight time Canadian Champion Rod Hay who had previously held the record at $101,646 (set in 2005).

“It’s pretty special; it’s something I’ve dreamed of as long as I can remember,” Green said. “I always wanted to ride broncs and wanted to be a Canadian champion. It’s a dream come true. And to walk out in the arena with one of your best friends (Thurston) and know that either you or him is going to be Canadian champion is something I’ll never forget.”

For the first time since 2009, a Canadian reigns supreme in the tie down roping event. Nanton, Alberta cowboy, Logan Bird edged fellow Canadian, Riley Warren, by less than $1000 for the win. Bird had to overcome a broken barrier in the last round, and capitalized on the struggles of several in the field of 12 (including the defending world champion Tyson Durfey and the last Canadian to win it, Alwin Bouchard) to capture the title.

“When you come to the CFR, you’re not just roping against anybody,” Bird stated. “You’ve got to be on your game because these are the best in the world.”

The 23 year old’s success is due, in large measure, to two things: his encyclopedic knowledge of the calves and his 13 year old gray gelding, TJ, the 2016 tie down roping horse of the year. “I wouldn’t be here without TJ. He helps me out so much. In my opinion, he’s probably the best horse in Canada, and close to the best horse in the world.”

Carman Pozzobon clinches the title of Canadian Barrel Racing Champion. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

The closest race at this year’s CFR was in the ladies barrel racing where Aldergrove, British Columbia cowgirl, Carman Pozzobon, slipped by Texan, Jaime Hinton, by just $183. Pozzobon, the Canadian season leader, finished up the year with $68,399 and her first gold buckle.

“My main goal (on the final day) was to get around all three barrels; I didn’t care if it was ugly or not,” the gifted horse trainer said. Pozzobon was first out on Championship Sunday and finished fourth in the round with a 14.660 to capture second place in the average en route to the title. The two time CFR qualifier was riding her seven year old mare, Ripp n Lady (Ripp), 2017 Canadian barrel horse of the year.

A trio of American cowboys captured Canadian titles in 2017. Seth Hardwick of Ranchester, Wyoming caught season leader and three time Canadian champion, Jake Vold, in the bareback riding to win the title by a margin of just $850. Hardwick placed in every round and won the average for a total of $74,980.

The steer wrestling honor went to Benton, Arkansas cowboy, Jason Thomas, who – like Harwick – put together six go-round placings and an average win for a total of $59,177 to best second place finisher, Scott Guenthner, by $5000.

Cowboys flock to congratulate Tanner Girletz on an incredible career. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

And in the bull riding, season leader, Garrett Smith of Rexburg, Idaho, laid claim to his first Canadian championship by riding four of his six bulls and finishing second in the average for an $8000 margin of victory over the second place man, Tanner Girletz. Girletz, the 2006 Canadian champion, was at his ninth Canadian Finals and announced before the start of this year’s CFR that this was his final season as a bull rider.

Ky Marshall in the All Around (second time) and Morgan Grant for the High Point award (3rd time) were repeat winners. Earlier in the week, the youth event champions were crowned. Connor Hamilton of Calgary is the 2017 Novice bareback champion; Dawson Hay (Wildwood, AB) is the novice saddle bronc winner and Luke Ferber of Irricana won his second steer riding title.

Top CFR stock honors went to C5 Rodeo for their bareback horse, Virgil; the Calgary Stampede for saddle bronc, Wild Cherry and the Kesler Rodeo company for their bull, Flight Plan.

In its 44th and final year at Northlands Coliseum, CFR 44 attracted 90,268 fans – a 3.3% increase over last year’s attendance figure.

Find complete results at rodeocanada.com

About the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association

The Canadian Professional Rodeo Association (CPRA) with headquarters in Airdrie, Alberta is the sanctioning body for professional rodeo in Canada. The CPRA approves over 50 events annually with a total payout exceeding $5.1 million. The organization holds the Grass Roots Final (at the Agrium Western Event Centre, Stampede Park in Calgary, Alberta) each September and their premiere event – the Canadian Finals Rodeo (CFR) – in Edmonton in November. Follow the CPRA on Twitter and Instagrm @prorodeocanada, ‘Like’ Canadian Professional Rodeo Association on Facebook or online at RodeoCanada.com

Edmonton’s Premier Western Events Shine

Courtesy of Northlands 

A Final Tip of the Hat to CFR at Northlands. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo

EDMONTON, AB (November 12, 2017) – For the past five days, Northlands was honoured to host the 44th annual Canadian Finals Rodeo and Farmfair International from November 8 – 12 at Northlands Coliseum and the Edmonton EXPO Centre. Two of Edmonton’s largest annual events spurred western excitement throughout the Northlands grounds and the entire city of Edmonton, with a combined attendance of 191,397.

 “We are proud of the incredible growth achieved by Farmfair International,” said Tim Reid, President and CEO, Northlands. “The success of this event further demonstrates the importance of agriculture to Northlands and to Alberta’s economy. Farmfair is an integral part of the future of Northlands as we embrace our agricultural roots moving forward.”

The 44rd edition of Farmfair International drew a record 101,129 guests to the Edmonton EXPO Centre to take in cattle shows and sales, equine events, the Heritage Ranch Rodeo, RAM Country Marketplace and more. This a 5.8% increase over last year’s record breaking attendance, and the first time Farmfair International has attracted more than 100,000 guests. Farmfair International brought 140 international buyers from 14 countries together to conduct business, trade industry knowledge and to purchase top-quality genetics from Alberta producers. The number of international buyers is up 55% over last year. With more than 1,500 head of livestock exhibited including more than 1,000 head of purebred cattle, the 2017 edition of Farmfair International was one of the biggest yet.

From humble beginnings in 1974, the first Canadian Finals Rodeo drew 24,000 guests to the Edmonton Gardens. In its 44th and final year at Northlands Coliseum, 90, 268 guests took in six action-packed performances over five days. This is a 3.3% increase over last year’s attendance. As the largest indoor rodeo in Canada, 108 competitors chased the dream for championship buckles and their share of more than $1.5 million in prize money. The Roadhouse presented by TD brought live performances to the Edmonton EXPO Centre on Friday and Saturday including Dallas Smith’s Side Effects Tour presented by Old Camp, as well as Tanya Tucker and Aaron Pritchett to keep the party going after CFR performances.

“Fans of the Canadian Finals Rodeo came out to show their support and demonstrated the impact this event has on our local economy,” said Tim Reid, President and CEO, Northlands. “We thank the CFR fans for their support and loyalty over the last 44 years. This is not goodbye but see you later.”

The Boutique Boss Babe

Bobbie Eskdale, the successful boss babe behind Bold & Brassy Boutique. Photo Credit: Callaghan Creative Co.

Bobbie Eskdale owns and operates Bold & Brassy Boutique, an online fashion boutique that totes itself as offering “today’s trends with a touch of twang!” Eskdale’s energy and positive is infectious, and she manages to run a successful business while also being a wife, and mother to two. WHR sat down with Eskdale to discover the ins and outs of running a boutique, and the lessons she has learned along the way.

1. What made you want to start your own boutique?

I wish I could tell you all that it’s been an idea that I’ve had since I was a little girl. Really, the idea didn’t show up until I was looking for my answer in my adult life. My inspiration came while driving home from my 9-5, in a rusted out ford pick up truck after a bad day at work. I was blasting Miranda Lambert on the radio. I remember saying out loud ‘this isn’t what I am meant to do’ – I wasn’t meant to work someone else’s dream for the entirety of this short time here. Almost as soon as I said those words out loud the Pink Pistol [Miranda Lambert’s Boutique] popped into my head. Immediately I got goosebumps, it was the thought that showed up that was my answer.

That was over 5 years ago now. I sat on that idea that maybe I could open my very own “Pink Pistol” and manifest my own, unique dream. Over the course of quite a few years, the vision and the plan changed to take my business online, to really align myself with timing and the trend of online shopping.  The combination of longing for a life that is bigger than my wildest dreams for my family and the desire of wanting more in my closet than hand-me-down clothes (and passing that along to my customers) and  the courage bring my vision to life is the dream that has now manifested into Bold & Brassy!

2. How did starting your own boutique all come together? 

The whole coming together thing really can be summed up in one tiny saying. It was a hot mess! There really isn’t one, single glamorous behind the scenes thing. The process didn’t flow easily to me, haha! I officially launched Bold & Brassy online boutique on November 19, 2015. I chose this date because it is both my husband and I’s birthday and he’s also a huge driving force behind this dream. I really want to be his sugar mama and just take care of him, the way he has taken care of me. He works as a power line man, out in the cold. When I let him in on my vision and expressed that he was a huge part of it and one of the reasons WHY, he was totally on board. So it was in 2014 I really spent the whole year planning, researching, researching some more..basically devoting the entirety of the year to the vision and my plan.

Two years later, I don’t have it all figured out. I imagine the moment I do have it all figured out, the business will fail. I always strive to be green and growing, not ripe & rotting. I honestly can say to bring something together, it’s not about the “one thing”. It’s about seemingly insignificant things, compounded over time that gives you results. My business is still coming together, one foot in front of the other. Day by day. The vision is what keeps growing and moving forward even though the way to get there sometimes changes.

The Eskdale family. Photo Credit: Olive You Portraits.

3. What was the biggest lesson you’ve learned in opening a boutique?

The biggest lesson I’ve learned through opening my business is it’s not about what you do it’s about who you become. I’ve also learned a lot about people because the funny thing about “lessons” is they often show up in the form of people. One of the things I heard most about this industry before diving in was that it was tough. That it’s “cut throat”. I chose to ignore that stigmatism because behind every business is a person. A person with a WHY. A person with purpose and a person with a story. The moment I allow ego to separate myself from that truth, a lesson shows up. It can show up in the form of my “competition” writing a not so friendly message or social media post to me, to people offering their opinion on what I should do better etc. These are all, for the most part, pretty humbling experiences and allow me to connect back with my truth. It’s not about selling clothes, it’s about becoming the best version of who you can be and how you can serve others through the lessons you’ve learned.

As I continue to learn and grow and see things for what they are, the reward just keeps getting better and better. For every person out there that may have a negative nancy thing to say, there are 10 more that are rooting for you. People that love you, that support you and want to bring light and joy to what you are doing. I receive that through increased sales, people attending my pop up events, people posting great reviews, being invited to participate in events, a private message that says something really sweet etc. We are all just people doing the best we can with what we are given. The only competition we have is with ourselves so keeping connected with women who are fun, joyful and positive through fashion is seriously the best and surrounding yourself with people who elevate you and have strengths you can learn from is key!

4. What makes Bold and Brassy different than the other boutiques?

We are all selling a bunch of clothes and accessories, so we are more or less the same. The uniqueness, authenticity & character comes from the person behind the business. There are so many amazing women in this industry that totally rock and I’m not about to put myself on a pedestal and come across like I’m doing something better. I’m certainly not. I strive to just be myself, keep my blinders on and do me. I find if I remain authentic, nurture the seeds I’ve planted and be quick to change what isn’t working for me and my business it will continue to flourish. I don’t have time to compare my business to other businesses. I haven’t walked a mile in their shoes, nor have they mine so I just keep moving forward and taking action to the ideas planted in my mind. I have partnered with some pretty amazing women to have brought that vision to life so I’m going to keep doing that. My photographer is outstanding and that part totally elevates my business. My media wizard helps bring my ideas to life through her design expertise etc. I am going to just keep aligning myself with people who have skills to pay the bills! HA!

Eskdale says that her family is her “why”. Photo Credit: Olive You Portraits.

5. How do you balance being a mom and wife, with also being a boss babe business owner? 

First things first, I’m a realist. LOL Sorry, I’m getting a little gangster. That tends to come out in me when my little mob is hanging around. I don’t think balance exists. It doesn’t for me anyways so please if you know of someone who REALLY does it all, send her my way, take all my money because I’ll pay for that advice. I cry a lot. There’s a ton of coffee and wine being drank on the regular. I don’t sit around and watch shows because there’s always something that I could be doing that will set me up for a more productive afternoon, week etc. My husband makes me make lists, ha! Even if I have 17 different lists.

I also received some amazing advice from a mentor and she says, do one thing every single day that will move your business forward. So instead of feeling like a failure because I didn’t complete the 17 different lists, I can feel accomplished because I at least did one thing that day for my business. My kids are my priority but sometimes I have to choose my business over my family and friends. It’s taken me a long time and a ton of tears to learn that that is ok. I’m a still a great mom and wife. They know they are my why, they know why I do what I do. My kids are learning so much through my grit and commitment to my business. If my kids one day look at me and say “Mom, because you did it and you showed me what it takes, I know I can do it too.” it will all be worth it. My kids are 5 & 3 years old and although this time in life with them being so young can be super hard, It’s a choice I made. I constantly have to remind myself that one day they are going to be bigger and this stage is temporary. I don’t want to be wishing it away. If I need uninterrupted, focused time I ask for help. That’s something I never used to do because of my independent nature and stubborn pride but it’s helped me so much. I’ve accepted I can’t do it all and that’s a-ok!

6. When you’re buying clothes for the boutique, where do you draw your inspiration from? How do you know what will “work” and what won’t?

One thing I’m pretty good at is visualization. That has come in VERY handy with styling outfits and looks for my website. For the most part, my inspiration comes from my friends. They are the Bold & Brassy tribe. God gave us two ears and one mouth for a reason and when my friends and family offer up their opinions on what they think will look good, or what they’d like to see in my online store..I listen. In the beginning, I was drawing inspiration from what I THOUGHT people would want to see. Looking for validation outside of you never works, so clearly the stuff that I purchased that wasn’t totally me, or something I wouldn’t wear because it’s what I thought people would want, did sell. Now, I only buy pieces I personally would wear or my friends whose opinions I really value would wear. Basically, what works is when I’m authentically loving up on a piece! Looking within for that validation instead of looking at my peers in this industry and what they are selling.

Eskdale at a recent WHR photo-shoot. Photo Credit: Callaghan Creative Co.

7. What advice would you give someone who wanted to go down a similar path of business ownership?

If I was going to offer up some advice (which I’m totally not qualified to do hah!) it would be this; You must have grit. You must be tenacious. You have to be willing to do what other people aren’t in order to fulfill your goals and dreams. I’ve had people ask me for every little step along the way looking for me to give the easy answer. Looking for the “HOW”. It’s not about the how. It’s about the willingness, eagerness and the unique WHY that needs to come from within in order to make it happen.

You need to have an attitude of gratitude. Business fluctuates and when it does you need to be grateful for all the ups and downs because what is the other option!? You need to be open to creative solutions and possibilities in an effort to keep your business moving forward. This is where you need to honour your authenticity and your unique special touch that only you have.

There is also no room for ego in a successful business. I would suggest not allowing yourself to get sidetracked by someone who isn’t even on your tracks! Lastly, commit to who you will become along the way and you will achieve greatness and whatever you do. Just have fun!

Eggs Benedict

There is honestly nothing we love more on a lazy Sunday morning, than the chance to sleep in and make Eggs Benedict for a late morning brunch. This recipe has been handed down to me and the Hollandaise sauce is truly what makes it – no packaged sauces around here!

The sauce is honestly the hardest part of the recipe, which is why I’ll focus mostly on that here. But let me tell you, when it all comes together on a perfectly poached egg, with two freshly cooked pieces of bacon and a nicely toasted English muffin, this is heaven on a Sunday!

 

Hollandaise Sauce

• 2 Eggs (separated)

• 1/2 Cup Sour Cream

• 1 Tbsp. Tarragon Vinegar

• 1 Tbsp. Lemon Juice

• Dash Tobasco Sauce

• 1/2 Tsp. Salt

• 1/4 lb. Butter

Separate the eggs and set aside the whites for other uses. Whip the yokes, sour cream, salt and liquids together until smooth and yellow. Pour into a small sauce or frying pan and stir on low heat. Do not allow sauce or frying pan and stir on low heat. Do not allow mixture to boil. Add butter in small amounts, stirring until it melts. Serve when hot. It is imperative the mixture does not boil because it will separate. If it does, whip it back together until smooth.

If you need some tips on poaching eggs, check out this site: The Spruce

The trick to bringing everything together at the same time is to ensure your bacon and sauce are made prior to toasting the English muffins and poaching the eggs. Once you’ve got your bacon and sauce made, set them aside. Then once your water is boiling, put your English muffins into toast and crack your eggs to poach at almost the same time.

When eggs are cooked, add a layer of bacon on top of a toasted muffin. Then add the poached egg on top and finish with generous dollop of Hollandaise sauce.

As an aside, this Hollandaise recipe can’t be beat over top of cooked asparagus, crab melts, or steak. Enjoy!

CFR Fashion Inspiration

If you’re headed to the Canadian Finals Rodeo next week, we’ve got some outfit inspiration for you! There’s no denying it’s the perfect venue to bring out the good stuff. We also know it can  be tricky to stay warm in a Canadian winter and look amazing at the same time. Not to worry, we’ve got you covered! No matter your preference – boho, traditional, vaquero, urban, haute couture, or gyspy – this blog aims to satisfy the cowgirl fashionista in all of us.

Layering is a big deal this year. As seen in this look by The Wacky Wagon Fashion, a turquoise kimono and tee are paired with strands of beautiful turquoise necklaces.

Cody & Sioux just brought in these perfect new poncho arrivals, just in time for a winter storm! Unlike a wrap, these cozy beauties slip over your head and promise to keep you warm and fashionable all evening long.

Savannah Sevens can seemingly do no wrong. This faux fur boa fling is the ultimate accessory. With its gorgeous variation in color and lined satin inside, it’s the perfect item to drape yourself fashionably in warmth. Shown styled with The Lonesome Dove hat, Tallon Necklace and Burke Necklace.

 

This adorable (and comfortable!) fleece “slouch” sweatshirt from Rodeo Tuff is feminine, cozy and versatile. It’s designed with an exceptionally plush fabrication, in a classic pullover fit with a wide neck that can be worn pulled off the shoulder.

 

Sweaters and tees with cheeky sayings are all the rage. Wear them on their own, or pair them with kimonos, denim jackets or dusters. This one from Tonic Equestrian will make you look fabulous no matter where you are and is an essential for any fashionable equestrian! This stylish, easy to wear top is designed to drape comfortably over the body with a wide neck and ribbed waist.

Mustard is the color of the year this year. If you’re looking for a dressier look this CFR, then a mustard colored duster is the way to go. We love this look from The Lace Cactus.

Denim on denim, plus an ivory silky faux fur vest by Dylan, literally warms our hearts on a chilly day! This is another look from Savannah Sevens, featuring a Ryan Micheal shirt and a puffer style vest by Dylan. Shown styled with The Doc Bar Wallet, Calhoun Earrings, Rogue River Necklace and The Bronc Buster shirt.

This look from Classic Rodeo in Nanton, AB, features a shirt from Double D Ranchwear, a Goldspring Hat, and Navajo Pearls.

Don’t let your CFR outfit planning be overwhelming this year. These looks will take you stylishly from day to night and keep you warm in the process. See you in Edmonton!

 

You Never, Ever, Quit… Not When it’s for Real

 

By Todd Lemieux

The photograph above was taken in August 1944 at St-Lambert-sur-Dives, France. It shows Major David Currie, South Alberta Regiment, with pistol in hand, accepting the surrender of a German officer. Tanks are smouldering in the streets behind him. The noted Canadian military historian, C.P. Stacey, described the scene, “as close as we are likely to come to a photograph of a man winning the Victoria Cross.” The occasion was the final entrapment of the Germans in the Falaise pocket.

My grandfather, Trooper John Barnett, fought at this and other battles with Currie during the harrowing days of World War II. As a kid he told me once, “You never, ever quit… not when it’s for real.” I’ll never know what that means as much as he did. John Barnett lived into his 90’s and still had nightmares about the war, right up until he died. His experience in World War II, as a teenager, forged his life forever more.

On Aug. 18,1944, Currie, a major with the South Alberta Regiment, was in charge of a small mixed force of Canadian tanks, self-propelled anti-tank guns and infantry. He was given the task of blocking the German escape route through the village of St-Lambert-sur-Dives. Stiff enemy resistance in the village held up his unit when two tanks were badly hit by German fire. The citation for his Victoria Cross states that he, “Immediately entered the village alone on foot at last light through the enemy outposts to reconnoitre the German defences and extricate the crews of the disabled tanks, which he succeeded in doing in spite of heavy mortar fire.”

Early the next day, Currie led an attack on the village in the face of vicious resistance from enemy tanks, guns and infantry. By midday, Currie’s small, but determined force had succeeded–without any previous artillery support–in seizing and consolidating a position halfway inside the village. For the next 36 hours, the Germans hurled one counter-attack after another at the Canadians. In Currie’s own words, “They threw everything but the kitchen sink at us.”

Inspired by western movies, Currie broke his small force up into fire teams and dispersed them in such a fashion, to lend the appearance of a bigger force. Currie had arranged his defences so effectively that the counter-attacks were repulsed with heavy losses to the enemy. During the onslaught, Currie not only displayed a contemptuous defiance for the enemy as he led his men against repeated assaults, but also, took part in the battle himself. On one occasion he personally directed the fire of his command tank onto a German Tiger tank and succeeded in knocking it out.

Trooper John Barnett (holding the map) takes a break after the Battle of the Falaise Gap.

 

During another attack he used a rifle from the turret to kill enemy snipers who had infiltrated to within 50 yards of his headquarters. Another time, even though his unit’s artillery fire was falling within 15 yards of his tank, he ordered it continued because it was having a devastating effect on the enemy. At dusk on Aug. 20, the enemy tried to mount a decisive attack to break their way out but failed miserably. The attack force was routed before it could be deployed. Currie promptly ordered an attack and completed the capture of the village, effectively blocking that part of the Chambois-Trun escape route and denying it to the Germans trapped in the Falaise pocket.

Throughout the engagement Currie had no respite from the battle. In fact, he managed only one hour’s sleep during the entire period. When relief finally arrived he was so exhausted he fell asleep on his feet and collapsed.

The yield to his depleted Canadian force was enormous for a single unit: seven enemy tanks, 12 88-mm guns and 40 vehicles destroyed; hundreds of Germans killed or wounded; and an amazing 2,100 captured.

Born in Sutherland, Sask., on July 8, 1912, Currie moved to Moose Jaw and attended King George Public School and Central Collegiate. Later he attended the Moose Jaw Technical School where he studied auto mechanics and welding. Before WW II broke out he joined the militia in Moose Jaw and in January 1940 enlisted in the regular army with the rank of lieutenant.

Following the war Currie held several executive positions in Baie Comeau, Que., and Montreal. In 1959, Prime Minister John Diefenbaker appointed him sergeant-at-arms of the House of Commons. In later years he served as vice-chairman of the Victoria Cross and George Cross associations and every two or three years led a delegation to England.
Currie died June 20, 1986, in hospital at Ottawa after suffering a heart attack. He is buried in Owen Sound, Ont.

John Barnett passed away peacefully, in Moose Jaw, September 9th, 2010, age 90.

‎Semper Alacer

“Lest We Forget”

David Currie after receiving his Victoria Cross from King George VI. Currie only agreed to receive the award and meet the King if he wore his battle dress to the ceremony. He felt that people should see the mud and blood on it, to appreciate what his men had been thru at Falaise Gap.

 

Troopers of Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians) on horseback. Frequently Canadian troops would befriend local villager’s and borrow horses to ride as a break from the endless grind of European battlefields.