Bounce Back Night for Canadian Cowboys

COURTESY OF THE CANADIAN PROFESSIONAL RODEO ASSOCIATION

December 11, 2017

After a couple of sub-par nights, Team Canada bounced back with a strong performance in the fifth go-round of the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. Five members of the nine-man Canadian contingent cashed cheques, making this easily their best night to date.

It was a case of saving the best for the last as two-time Canadian Steer Wrestling Champion, Tanner Milan, was 3.8 seconds on the last steer in the round to pick up his second go-round win and the $26,320 first place cheque. The win moved the Cochrane, Alberta man to 4th place in both the average and the world standings.

“I just have to keep running at it every night,” Milan noted. “I can’t back off. The horse I’m riding, Maverick who belongs to Tom Lewis, has been getting my feet on the ground really fast and I just have to stay aggressive.”

Ty Erickson, the Montana cowboy, continues to lead the world standings but Milan has moved to within $63,000 of the leader with five rounds and the all-important average still to be decided. Provost, Alberta bulldogger, Scott Guenthner checked in with a 6.6 second run and was out of the money. Guenthner sits in 10th place on the world leaderboard.

You know the pen of bareback horses is pretty sweet when 87.5 is good for only a 5/6 split. That was the case in go-round number five of the 2017 WNFR. Canadian cowboy Orin Larsen was that guy on this night as he matched up with Wilson Sanchez from the Hi Lo ProRodeo Company. The horse, born and raised near Rocky Mountain House, actually came from the Hollingsworth family of Eckville and to add to the intrigue, Larsen’s sister is married to a Hollingsworth. You know Central Alberta was cheering for the Manitoba man who is at his third WNFR. Larsen has placed in four of five rounds for over $56,000 won and sits in fifth place in both the average and the world standings.

Santaquin, Utah cowboy, Mason Clements, won the round with an 89 point ride while Tim O’Connell maintained his big lead at the top of the standings. Jake Vold whose 85 score wasn’t quite enough to get into the money, has dropped back to fourth place in the world standings behind the seemingly unstoppable Tim O’Connell, Richmond Champion and Tanner Aus.

You knew it was just a matter of time for Jeremy Buhler. And tonight was the time. The defending world champion and his WNFR partner, Arizona header, Tom Richards. posted a 4.0 to catch a 3/4 split in the round and a pair of $13,326 cheques. It was the first qualified time and the first payday for the duo that was thrown together when Buhler’s longtime partner Levi Simpson just missed qualifying for this year’s WNFR. Erich Rogers and Cory Petska split the round with Clay Tryan and Jade Corkill. The 3.9 second result took Rogers and Petska, the Arizona superstars, to a narrow lead in the world standings.

Things finally went the way Canadian saddle bronc riding fans thought they’d go right from the start as the reigning world champion, Zeke Thurston and 2017 Canadian Champion, Layton Green were part of a fifth go-round 2/3/4 split. Both cowboys cashed cheques for $15,794 and for Thurston it meant he was able to gain a little ground on the season leader, Jacobs Crawley.

The Big valley, Alberta 23 year-old’s ride on Wound Up, the 2017 Saddle Bronc of the Year, enabled him to climb back into second place in the world standings ahead of CoBurn Bradshaw, the third place man who leads the all-important average. For Green, the Meeting Creek, Alberta man, it was his first cheque of this – his first WNFR. The third Canadian, 2016 Canadian Champion, Clay Elliott finished out of the money in the go round with an 80-point ride. C5 Rodeo’s Double D won the Rank Horse of the Night award as he parted company with Jake Wright before the eight second horn.

Tie Down Roper, Marty Yates, turned in the fastest run of this WNFR at 7.0 seconds flat for the go-round win with season leader Tuf Cooper just one tick back at 7.1. It was a critical run for Cooper as he was able to put some space between him and second place man, Marcos Costa, and Trevor Brazile who had been closing fast on the leader and now sits third. Costa, the Brazilian roper, leads the average with Trevor Brazile second and Cooper right behind. Cooper’s run tonight also tightened the race for the All-Around title where he and brother-in-law, Brazile, are duking it out as well with Brazile holding a $47,000 lead over Cooper.

And in the barrel race, Colorado cowgirl, Ivy Conrado and four time Canadian Champion, Lisa Lockhart of Oelrichs, South Dakota split the round, both with 13.59 runs. Season leader, Tiany Schuster, had her fastest run of the Finals with a 13.90 but for the fifth night in a row, was out of the money. Schuster who sits 6th in the average has to be feeling the heat just a little as three or four cowgirls are all mounting a charge at the Krum, Texas cowgirl who was so dominant throughout the regular season.

2016 Canadian Bull Riding Champion, Jordan Hansen, of Calgary bucked off a tough outlaw called Crime Boss from Universal Rodeo. The result leaves Hansen at 1 for 5 at the midway point of the rodeo. Meanwhile Sage Steele Kimzey is starting to distance himself from the field as he pursues a fourth consecutive title. Kimzey, who hails from Strong City, Texas, rode Beutler and Son’s Shootin’ Stars to 89 points and the round win. He sits second in the average to fellow-Texan, Trey Benton III who bucked off for the first time on Monday night.

Vold Takes First Victory Lap of 2017 WNFR

Courtesy of the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association

 

Jake Vold takes the go-round win on the first night of the WNFR. Photo Credit: Canadian Professional Rodeo Association

Canadian cowboys got off to a fast start at the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

Three time Canadian champion, Jake Vold, wasted no time in resuming his signature lights-out performances in Las Vegas. Vold who finished second in the world a year ago and won three rounds and $165,000 in the Thomas and Mack Arena, picked up where he left off with a tremendous 87.5 on Kesler Rodeo’s Oakridge. The win netted the Airdrie cowboy the $26,230 first place cheque and moved him to third in the world standings with $138,391 in the bank, now $87,000 back of season leader and defending world champion Tim O’Connell.

“It’s a good confidence builder,” Vold noted of his first night ride. “There are a lot of horses here and going at that kind of money, I find quite exciting. It’s keeps your blood flowing. I need to win a lot of money to have a chance at a world title. To get the win right off the bat is definitely key. Hopefully a guy can keep it rolling and see what happens after the 10 days”.

Provost, Alberta steer wrestler, Scott Guenthner, did not appear to feel any nerves as he made his first-ever appearance at the WNFR posting a solid 4.3 second run to be among a cluster of bulldoggers with that time. Guenthner split 3/4/5/6/6 for a nice $7530 start to his Finals.  Cochrane’s Tanner Milan, at his second Las Vegas Finals, was 6.6 seconds on his steer and finished out of the money. Defending world champion, Tyler Waguesback, won the round with a 3.5 second run to keep his repeat title hopes very much alive. He sits third in the world at $140,000, $33,000 behind Helena, Montana dogger, Ty Erickson.

In the saddle bronc riding, defending world champion, Zeke Thurston of Big Valley, Alberta, closed the gap on the season leader and 2015 World Champion, Jacobs Crawley. The 23 year-old Canadian now trails Crawley by just $9,000 after a 5/6/6 split on the Calgary Stampede stallion Timely Delivery. The second generation bronc rider was 85 points on the horse on this night, as the pair reprised their July Calgary Stampede matchup that ended with Thurston collecting 90 points. Crawley finished out of the money on a night that saw Oklahoma cowboy Hardy Braden win the round with an 87.5 score. Utah’s Ryder Wright (86.5) and 2015 Canadian champion Cody DeMoss (85.5) won 3rd and 4th respectively on a couple of Canadian broncs, C5 Rodeo’s Black Hills and Outlaw Buckers’ three time Canadian champion Lunatic Party.

Clay Elliott and Layton Green, the other two Canadians in the bronc riding, both managed 79 scores on night number one.

Defending world champion team roping heeler, Jeremy Buhler of Arrowwood, caught a leg and was 9.3 seconds with partner Tom Richards after Canadian partner, Levi Simpson, finished just out of the 2017 WNFR. Buhler remains in 15th spot in the world standings in a round that was won by Kaleb Driggers and reigning All Around Champion, Junior Nogueira, who also sit atop the world standing, both with over $170,000 on the season.

And in the bull riding, Calgary’s 2016 Canadian champion, Jordan Hansen, first Canadian to qualify for the WNFR since 2001, was bucked off by Beutler and Son Rodeo’s Lumberjack. Hansen came to Las Vegas in 13th place overall. The round was won by Trey Benton lll, as he rode the Big Stone bull, Mortimer, to 90 points.  Joe Frost, he Utah bull rider rode Outlaw Buckers’ Bomb Shell to 84 points for 5th place in the round. 2017 Canadian champion, Garrett Smith from Rexburg, Idaho, narrowed the gap on season leader Sage Kimsey as he posted an 85.5 point ride for 4th place in the round while Kimsey, the three-time titleist, finished out of the money with a 79 mark. Smith moves to within $20,000 of the leader as he vies for his first world crown.

Roasted Game Hen with Sundried Fruit Stuffing

The weather has been unseasonably nice for winter in Canada recently so we decided to prep the Western Horse Review kitchen and get ready for the upcoming Christmas season, while hosting an outdoor dinner party for our friends. This year we have been lucky to have the opportunity to learn a few things from chef, Mike Edgar. And on a day with no wind, we literally invited our guests up from riding to sit and enjoy a meal. Here, Chef Edgar shows us how to prepare a delicious dinner of roasted game hens with sundried fruit stuffing, brandy cider glaze and grilled vegetables.

Be forewarned – this may become you’re new favorite Christmas tradition!

Roasted Game Hen with Sundried Fruit Stuffing

*Serves 6 People

Hen:

3 Cornish hens

3 sprigs fresh rosemary

3 cloves garlic

1 lemon sliced

Salt

Pepper

1 cup cider

METHOD: Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Stuff each hen with rosemary, 1 clove of garlic, and 2 slices of lemon. Season the skin with salt and pepper. Put hens in roasting pan, place on the middle rack and reduce the heat to 350 degrees. Cook for an hour and 20 minutes. Baste the birds every 15 minutes with apple cider.

 

 

Brandy Cider Glaze:

1 L apple cider

1 cup brandy

2 tablespoons tomato paste

Pinch of salt

Handful of fresh thyme.

METHOD: Put all ingredients in a sauce pan and reduce on medium heat until it reaches a syrup like consistency and strain.

 

Grilled vegetables:

2 sweet potato sliced in ½ inch rounds

2 pints Cocktail tomatoes

2 yellow zucchini cut in half

2 green zucchini cut in half

METHOD: Toss all vegetables with olive oil, salt and pepper, grill until tender.

 

Stuffing:

1 baguette diced

2 carrots grated

1 onion diced

2 stalks celery sliced

1 cup dry apricot sliced

1 cup sundried cranberry

2 cloves garlic chopped

1 tablespoon salt

1 tablespoon pepper

½ cup chopped parsley

2 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme

¼ cup brandy

¼ cup white wine

1/4 cup 35% whipping cream

METHOD: In a large frying pan sauté carrot, onion, celery, garlic, thyme, salt and pepper until the vegetables are tender, add the sundried fruit, continue cooking for 2 minutes, deglaze the pan with the wine, brandy and cream. Allow the mixture to reduce by half. In a large bowl mix the cubed bread and the hot vegetable, fruit mixture together, when cooled add the chopped parsley. Transfer to a oven safe dish. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit. For 10 minutes.

CHEF’S BIO:

Mike Edgar graduated from the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in the Culinary Arts. He stayed in Calgary, AB working at some of the city’s top restaurants. In 2007, he opened his own restaurant in Calgary’s east end. After eight years of being a chef there, Edgar decided to take a step back and left the industry to spend more time with his son. His son has now expressed an interest in learning his father’s skills and in horses simultaneously.

EQUI-BUSINESS Preparation is Key

Traditional loans may be difficult for new equine operations to obtain these days, but not impossible. Especially when collateral that is not specifically horses, is offered.

BY JENN WEBSTER

Enthusiasm is important when planning a business in the horse industry, but preparation is critical. Let’s face it, lenders look at the borrowers in the equine industry on a case-by-case basis. It is a challenging industry for traditional banks to provide financing to, for two main reasons. Firstly, the horse business is specialized; if the primary operator were to have something unfortunate happen, a ranch can easily go under without someone else capable of stepping up to that level of expertise. Secondly, let’s face it; people who loves horses are sometimes not so great at running a business.

Having faced both of these hurdles plus numerous more, this blog has longtime been a goal of mine to bring to fruition. For young people dreaming of creating a life and a business in the horse industry, the daunting task of following through with those targets can be met with opposition at every turn. That’s why optimism is important – but strategic planning is what will keep you alive.

In this blog we’ll discuss things like business plans, risk management, home security and the various ways obtaining your dream of being in the horse business can be done. We’ll talk to real people who have “opted in” to the lifestyle and the future by investing in equine properties – and we’ll learn how they make it work any way they can.

If you’re wondering what makes me an authority to speak on such a topic – I’m not. However, alongside my husband I have owned two successful equine properties in my lifetime. The first one was in partnership with several other people. The second one is the operation we currently own ourselves, reside upon and the place where are raising our family. We run a training, breeding and boarding operation, are stallion owners and own Western Horse Review, Canada’s largest western riding and culture magazine. We have garnered a fair amount of experience in our 20+ years together in the horse industry. (And did I mention? Till Debt Do Us Part is my favorite TV show? I know, I know, everyone thinks I’m ridiculous… but I find it fascinating. Honestly, money management is a very useful skill when it comes to being an entrepreneur).

On that note, the one thing I have learned is that there is no straight line to success in the horse industry. Banks do not always look at horses as “tangible assets.” However, if you are lucky enough to have a good lender who does see the value in your equine assets, you will have to put yourself in their shoes if you want to achieve any sort of financing.

If you’re basing your business around “high-end” horses, this is considered a specialty market. For a lender to take security in your horses, it means if you default on your payments, your lender takes the security (your horses) as collateral to sell. However, a banker cannot readily go out and find a specific buyer to purchase the horse, nor do they likely have the connections to do so. In most cases they would simply want their money back for the debt outstanding. Therefore in that case, a banker would simply seize the asset and sell it at the nearest auction mart. Which is why the horse can’t be sold easily for $25,000 or valued as such in the banker’s eyes. When you get into higher end / specialty livestock markets, it takes more to shore up the equity required, versus what the banks could do.

There is no guaranteed path to securing financing for a horse business, but if there is one critical element to gaining approval it would highlighting the “business” aspects of you and your loan application. Banks loan money as an investment, with the expectation of getting repaid with interest. To that end most loan officers are unfamiliar with the horse industry, and a comprehensive business plan that educates while establishing the profitability of the activity is critical.

When we return with our Equi-Business blog series, we’ll analyze the parts of a successful business plan. (And I’m not just blowing smoke – I can tell you it’s successful, because I’ve used the same model three times!)

Until then, here is some forward thinking I’d like to leave you with. There may be a number of programs available to help you develop your idea or product. The assistance available to you depends on the type of service or product you are developing. Most financial assistance will not cover all your costs, so remember you will need to invest some of your own money into the project as well.

Secondly there are several things a financial lender will want to consider about you. These include:

• Character: The moral obligation of the borrower to pay his or her debts;
• Capacity to Pay: The ability of the borrower to pay the debt;
• Capital: The total of equity and debt in the business (a low debt-to-asset ratio suggests financial stability);
• Collateral: Assets owned by the borrower but promised to the lender to secure the debt (the lender retains a security interest in the collateral and can foreclose in case of a default; horses as collateral might be a problem);
• Conditions: Economic conditions, location, competition, and the health of the industry; and
• Confidence: A subjective decision–is the borrower trustworthy?

‘Till we meet again!

Agribition sets new records in 2017

Photo Credit: Canadian Western Agribition

REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN – Canadian Western Agribition (CWA) was the first event to be hosted in the new International Trade Centre November 20 – 25, and organizers are calling it a success, including the setting of several new records.

Total livestock sales were the best they’ve been since 1997 and the second highest in CWA history, at $3.5 million. Purebred cattle sales were at $2 million, a new record high. Total show attendance increased by 2.7% over 2016, with 126,500 visitors at the 2017 show. Attendance at the evening entertainment events reached a new record, with over 27,000 attendees taking in the Equine Extravaganza, Full Contact Jousting, and Agribition Pro Rodeo combined.

“We couldn’t have hoped for a better housewarming for Agribition’s new home in the International Trade Centre. The facility was the front door to the show this year and hosted a record number of international buyers,” says CWA CEO, Chris Lane.

CWA continues to be a global marketplace for livestock buyers and producers. The 2017 show saw a 40% increase and record high in international buyers at 365 total buyers from 86 different countries. Total international guests numbered 1,250.

“With strong numbers across the board, it shows that Agribition continues to grow and be a showcase of agricultural excellence. The records set this year set the stage for Agribition to be a true international hub of agriculture business, education and entertainment,” says Lane.

Other exciting events that took place during the 2017 event include awarding the inaugural Celebrating Women in Agriculture Award to Belinda Wagner, and announcing renewed partnerships with the Federal and Provincial governments.

The Honourable Lawrence McAulay, Minister of Agriculture for the Government of Canada, travelled to CWA from Ottawa to announce the details of the Canadian Agriculture Partnership (CAP). This is a five year, $3 billion federal, provincial, and territorial investment for Canada’s agriculture and agri-food sector. Honourable Lyle Stewart, Minister of Agriculture for the Government of Saskatchewan announced the Province will renew its partnership with CWA with a $200,000 four-year funding agreement.

Canadian Western Agribition’s financial results will be released at the Annual General Meeting in April 2018.

Praise Hemp

There is something exciting on the horizon of equine nutrition. As a relatively new food to western cultures, hemp is a tiny seed with gigantic nutritional benefits. So why choose hemp for your equine? Hemp seeds are a nutrient dense, all natural, low processed, easily digested form of healthy fats and exceptional source of plant-based protein. Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s) are essential to tissue growth and help regulate many internal functions. EFA’s are by definition, essential because they can’t be produced by the body and must be obtained through diet for proper growth and body functioning.

Essential Amino Acids (EAA’s) are the building blocks found in protein and hemp offers an excellent protein quality which rivals many grains, as well as soy and whey. By supplementing hemp oil, topping and protein fiber to our equine’s diet, you may notice an improvement in immune system, energy, digestion, skin and coat, mobility, muscle health and cardiovascular health.

Amanda Smith at the Calgary Wrangler Futurity. Photo by James Hudyma.

Western Horse Review recently got the chance to speak with cutter Amanda Smith of Wembley, AB. Smith has been using Praise Hemp products for the past year-and-a-half and loves the changes she has witnessed in one of her top competition geldings.

“I started giving it to my gelding that I show (Im Short And Smooth, aka ‘Fred’),” she explains. “Fred used to be spooky, nervous, lots of anxiety – he was wound pretty tight. I could tell a huge difference in Fred’s demeanor after two weeks of being on it. He was soft and quiet to be around and I could actually take him out on a trail ride and enjoy it! Plus he was super shiny. Once Fred had been on it for a couple of months and I noticed all the positives that came from it, I put the rest of our horses on it, along with the Praise Hemp Protein Fibre.”

Smith says that in her barn, her horses have all responded very well to the Praise Hemp products. The great thing for show horse owners is that horses will not test positive for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Praise Hemp’s Canadian hemp producers follow stringent guidelines under Health Canada’s Industrial Hemp Regulations. It is tested multiple times in the field and has virtually 0% THC. The company can even provide certificates of analysis to verify.

Additionally, horses enjoy the taste of Praise Hemp products.

“We don’t have a single horse that won’t eat it, they all love it!” says Smith. “What I’ve noticed the most across the board with all the horses is their body condition – they’re shiny and full. With the show horses I find they have more stamina and recover faster, they also maintain their weight throughout the show season.”

Smith also uses Praise Hemp products with her younger and breeding stock, including her broodmares. “All of our horses; weanlings, yearlings, show horses, broodmares and our stallion get both the Oil and Protein Fibre. My favourite thing about the product is that ALL our horses benefit from it!”

Amanda Smith. Photo by James Hudyma.

 

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For more information about Praise Hemp products, check out www.hempcocanada.com

Canadian Eh? 2017 Ladies of Canadian Pro Rodeo Fashion Show & Luncheon

This year the Ladies of Canadian Professional Rodeo celebrated Canada’s 150th Anniversary.

Each year during the Canadian Finals Rodeo in Edmonton, Alberta the Ladies of Canadian Professional Rodeo hosts a Luncheon & Fashion Show fundraiser. This year WHR was on hand at the event to witness all the fun and fashion that was had at the Canadian Eh? 2017 Ladies of Canadian Pro rodeo Fashion Show & Luncheon.

The luncheon & fashion show, a long time stand-out on the Canadian rodeo social scene, has generated over $291,000 to charitable causes. The funds raised by the event are distributed to the Cowboy Benefit Fund and the Canadian Pro Rodeo Sport Medicine Team (CPRSMT). The Cowboy Benefit Fund was established to provide emergency funding for Canadian Pro Rodeo Association members who are injured or placed in hardship due to injury. The fund relies on donations by rodeo fans, businesses and groups to maintain its resources. The CPRSMT plays an important role in and out of the rodeo arena, with their help rodeo athletes maintain a level of health in order to be better prepared to compete, reduce the effects of injuries and add longevity to their rodeo careers.

The event doubled as Miss Rodeo Canada 2017, Ali Mullin’s, final runway walk. Photo Credit: Classic Rodeo Boutique

Dr. Blaine Bugg, manager of the CPRSMT was on hand at the event, and took to the stage to commend the Ladies of Canadian Pro Rodeo for all the hard work they put into the luncheon and fashion show, and thanked them for their support. Another poignant moment came when Jim Nevada, of Roper Apparel and Footwear, took to the stage to introduce a memorial song to all the cowboys that were lost in 2017. With collaboration from Stacy Roper, Norm Swen and Don Johansen, and performed by Stacy Roper, Gord Bamford, and Duane Steele, the song was a beautiful tribute to the rodeo community. The luncheon serves many purposes, aside from raising money for great causes, it brings together the rodeo community for an afternoon of fun and fashion. There were lots of laughs around the room, and even more glitter and bling from the visiting rodeo queens from around Canada, and the world, including Miss Rodeo Australia, and Miss Rodeo Warwick.

Former Miss Rodeo Sundre, Kyla Williams, was in the running for Miss Rodeo Canada, and showed off a beautiful gown for her final walk. Photo Credit: Classic Rodeo Boutique.

Western fashion, with a Canadian twist, was the focus of the fashion show, with clothing provided by Roper and Wrangler through Lammles Western Wear and Tack. Audi Roy, of Classic Rodeo Boutique, was on hand to style and accessorize the outfits. The fashion show also shone a spotlight on the Miss Rodeo Canada pageant contestants who were vying for a chance to be crowned Miss Rodeo Canada 2018. Each of the five spectacular young women walked the stage in different fashions, while being evaluated for the final judged portion of pageant week before the crowning at the rodeo later in the evening. Despite what could be a nerve-wracking situation, all of the ladies were poised and beautiful as they made their way down the runway. Of course, Miss Rodeo Canada 2017, Ali Mullin, stole the show, as she sauntered down the runway for her final walk as Miss Rodeo Canada.

Former Miss Rodeo Medicine Hat, Brittney Chomistek, rocked fashion from Lammles Western Wear. Chomistek was crowned Miss Rodeo Canada 2018 later that evening at the CFR. Photo Credit: Classic Rodeo Boutique.

Overall the luncheon and fashion show was a massive success. Live music, entertainment and a delicious lunch was topped off with a fun fashion show, all while raising money for amazing causes within the rodeo community. If you have plans to head to CFR next year, make sure to put the Ladies of the Canadian Pro Rodeo Luncheon and Fashion show on your “to-do” last night, it’s a lot of fun – and for a great cause. What’s better than that?!

Former Calgary Stampede Princess, Lizzie Ryman, got a chance to catch up with the freshly crowned 2018 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio.

The Signs and Symptoms of PPID

Have you ever heard the term “Cushings”, and been unsure as to what that means? In reality it is Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID). Western Horse Review sat down with Dr. Doug Myers, a veterinarian from Boehringer Ingelheim Canada Ltd, to discuss PPID. PPID is a common condition of aged horses and as we learn more about the care and wellness of geriatric horses, increasing attention is being paid to the role of PPID in their lives.

Myers noted that recent study on PPID has suggested a link between horses and ponies that are afflicated with Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) developing PPID. It is now recommended that all horses with EMS over 10 years old be monitored for the signs of PPID.

These signs can include, but are not limited too, lethargy, loss of skeletal muscle mass, rounding of the abdomen, regional adiposity, abnormal sweating and laminitis.  The confirm PPID and assess the severity of the disease in your equine partner single sample resting Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (ACTH) testing is required. As with most things in the equine world, horses in the early stages of PPID are more of a challenge to diagnose and confirm. You may exhibit reduced performance, loss of muscle tone, or change of attitude. Other signs can include the horse taking a few weeks longer than normal to shed its winter hair coat.

Myers says, “In the fall of 2014, Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd. embarked on a pilot project to test horses across Canada that their veterinarians suspected PPID. All horses had a single plasma sample run for resting ACTH levels. The majority of these samples were taken in October, 2014. This project as well as the follow up 2015 testing program was done in attempt to assist Canadian veterinarians diagnose PPID suspect horses for the owners. A positive diagnosis of PPID can assist the owner with commencing treatment with Pergolide mesythlate (Prascend- Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd.).”

He continues, “Of the 98 horses for which ACTH results were available in 2014, 55 (56%) had resting ACTH levels consistent with a diagnosis of PPID. Three horses (3%) had borderline resting ACTH levels (10.4-11.3 pmol/L), and forty horses had normal seasonally-adjusted ACTH concentrations (<10.4 pmol/L). Of the horses with PPID, 10% were less than ≤ 10 years of age.”

In 2015, the Canada wide PPID testing program was repeated with a total of 200 submissions. Multiple breeds, including pony, pony crosses, quarter horses, warm bloods, thoroughbreds and arabs were involved. Of the 198 horses with ACTH results available, 151 (76 %) had a test result consistent with a PPID diagnosis (> 11.3 pmol/L). Six horses (3 %) had borderline ACTH results (10-4-11.3 pmol/L) and 41 horses (21 %) had levels found to be within a normal seasonally adjusted ACTH concentration (< 10.4 pmol/L). The two highest resting ACTH levels found were both in Miniature horses, 600 and 420 pmol/L respectively. Furthermore, of the horses tested, 65 % were 16 years of age or older, 29 % were between 11-15 years old, and 6 % were 10 years of age or younger.

Veterinarians were asked to state what clinical signs the horse had that made a differential diagnosis of PPID a possibility. Many horses had more than one clinical sign that was indicative of PPID. The most common clinical sign noted was laminitis (often chronic) in 51 reported cases. Hair coat or shedding issues were the second most reported sign accounting for 39 cases. Other clinical signs of note included weight changes (increased or decreased) , lethargy, other causes of lameness and chronic infections.

When Canadian equine veterinarians selected clients horses they suspected may have PPID, they were correct the majority of the time. In 2014, 56 % of the cases selected were positive for PPID based on a resting ACTH submission, while in 2015, 76 % of the horses tested positive for PPID when evaluated using a resting ACTH test.

In summary, subtle changes to your horse’s appearance could signal something big. But identifying PPID early may help ensure a better quality of life for your horse. Visit www.bicanadaequine.ca to find out if your horse is eligible for a free PPID test from Boehringer Ingelheim, and to learn more about PPID.

2017 Canadian Champions Declared

Courtesy of the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association

The Champions of CFR 44. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

Edmonton, ALTA – November 12, 2017

It was simply a case of unfinished business. For Canadian team ropers Levi Simpson and Jeremy Buhler, CFR44 offered the opportunity to fulfill a dream that had been left incomplete up to now. While Ponoka, Alberta header, Simpson, had a Canadian championship to his credit, to go along with his 2016 World Champion buckle, heeling partner, Jeremy Buhler, was still looking for his first Canadian title. Despite a slow start to their CFR (they had two no times in the first three rounds), the duo blazed their way through Super Saturday with back to back 4.1 second go-round winning runs and added a 4.2 second run on Championship Sunday to emerge as victors.

“It was very exciting to follow up a ‘dream come true season winning the world’ to come back up here, finally have a good year to come in here number one then outlast everyone until the end and stay number one.”

Simpson and Buhler, who also finished fifth in the average, ended the season with $59,006 each for a comfortable margin over second place finishers Justin and Brett McCarroll.

Layton Green erupts from a chute on the final day of CFR 44. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

Another season leader who was able to win a Canadian title was saddle bronc rider Layton Green of Meeting Creek, Alberta. Green saw second place man – and reigning world champion – Zeke Thurston, make up considerable ground on this lead over the first three rounds. But the 23 year old Green turned things around for the last three rounds of CFR44 and restored his comfortable edge. What was an amazing year for the second generation cowboy ended with Green establishing a new saddle bronc season earnings record. He wrapped up the year with $107,363 to move past eight time Canadian Champion Rod Hay who had previously held the record at $101,646 (set in 2005).

“It’s pretty special; it’s something I’ve dreamed of as long as I can remember,” Green said. “I always wanted to ride broncs and wanted to be a Canadian champion. It’s a dream come true. And to walk out in the arena with one of your best friends (Thurston) and know that either you or him is going to be Canadian champion is something I’ll never forget.”

For the first time since 2009, a Canadian reigns supreme in the tie down roping event. Nanton, Alberta cowboy, Logan Bird edged fellow Canadian, Riley Warren, by less than $1000 for the win. Bird had to overcome a broken barrier in the last round, and capitalized on the struggles of several in the field of 12 (including the defending world champion Tyson Durfey and the last Canadian to win it, Alwin Bouchard) to capture the title.

“When you come to the CFR, you’re not just roping against anybody,” Bird stated. “You’ve got to be on your game because these are the best in the world.”

The 23 year old’s success is due, in large measure, to two things: his encyclopedic knowledge of the calves and his 13 year old gray gelding, TJ, the 2016 tie down roping horse of the year. “I wouldn’t be here without TJ. He helps me out so much. In my opinion, he’s probably the best horse in Canada, and close to the best horse in the world.”

Carman Pozzobon clinches the title of Canadian Barrel Racing Champion. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

The closest race at this year’s CFR was in the ladies barrel racing where Aldergrove, British Columbia cowgirl, Carman Pozzobon, slipped by Texan, Jaime Hinton, by just $183. Pozzobon, the Canadian season leader, finished up the year with $68,399 and her first gold buckle.

“My main goal (on the final day) was to get around all three barrels; I didn’t care if it was ugly or not,” the gifted horse trainer said. Pozzobon was first out on Championship Sunday and finished fourth in the round with a 14.660 to capture second place in the average en route to the title. The two time CFR qualifier was riding her seven year old mare, Ripp n Lady (Ripp), 2017 Canadian barrel horse of the year.

A trio of American cowboys captured Canadian titles in 2017. Seth Hardwick of Ranchester, Wyoming caught season leader and three time Canadian champion, Jake Vold, in the bareback riding to win the title by a margin of just $850. Hardwick placed in every round and won the average for a total of $74,980.

The steer wrestling honor went to Benton, Arkansas cowboy, Jason Thomas, who – like Harwick – put together six go-round placings and an average win for a total of $59,177 to best second place finisher, Scott Guenthner, by $5000.

Cowboys flock to congratulate Tanner Girletz on an incredible career. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo.

And in the bull riding, season leader, Garrett Smith of Rexburg, Idaho, laid claim to his first Canadian championship by riding four of his six bulls and finishing second in the average for an $8000 margin of victory over the second place man, Tanner Girletz. Girletz, the 2006 Canadian champion, was at his ninth Canadian Finals and announced before the start of this year’s CFR that this was his final season as a bull rider.

Ky Marshall in the All Around (second time) and Morgan Grant for the High Point award (3rd time) were repeat winners. Earlier in the week, the youth event champions were crowned. Connor Hamilton of Calgary is the 2017 Novice bareback champion; Dawson Hay (Wildwood, AB) is the novice saddle bronc winner and Luke Ferber of Irricana won his second steer riding title.

Top CFR stock honors went to C5 Rodeo for their bareback horse, Virgil; the Calgary Stampede for saddle bronc, Wild Cherry and the Kesler Rodeo company for their bull, Flight Plan.

In its 44th and final year at Northlands Coliseum, CFR 44 attracted 90,268 fans – a 3.3% increase over last year’s attendance figure.

Find complete results at rodeocanada.com

About the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association

The Canadian Professional Rodeo Association (CPRA) with headquarters in Airdrie, Alberta is the sanctioning body for professional rodeo in Canada. The CPRA approves over 50 events annually with a total payout exceeding $5.1 million. The organization holds the Grass Roots Final (at the Agrium Western Event Centre, Stampede Park in Calgary, Alberta) each September and their premiere event – the Canadian Finals Rodeo (CFR) – in Edmonton in November. Follow the CPRA on Twitter and Instagrm @prorodeocanada, ‘Like’ Canadian Professional Rodeo Association on Facebook or online at RodeoCanada.com