Protecting Horses in Smoke-Filled Air

No filter. Smoke in the air lingers above a pasture. CREDIT: Jenn Webster

Though we may located be far away from the forest fire threats, the smoke here in Alberta is unbearable today. And there’s not much that can be done about it. I can’t even bring myself to send my kids outdoors on what should have been another beautiful summer day. So what can we do for the animals who must live outside in the current poor air quality conditions?

– Limit your horses’ activity outside when smoke is visible.
– Ensure your animals have plenty of fresh water.
– Monitor animals for coughing or an increased respiratory rate.
– If any horse is having trouble breathing, contact your vet immediately.

Smoke can cause respiratory issues in horses, just as it does in humans.  Take care out there.

Western Elegance

 

Have you seen the stunning western home we profiled recently in our July/August issue of Western Horse Review? If not, the issue is on stands now! Or better yet, get your subscription up to date here. This serene Albertan cottage borrows inspiration from minimalism and nature. Designed by home-owner Holly Fortier and Braemyn Homes, this 600-square foot home boasts unparalleled visibility of the outdoors from the living room and luxury features. There were so many wonderful photos of the cottage, we thought we’d share them with you digitally – but you’ll have to read the magazine for the full story!

 

Fortier’s mandate of light and brightness is evident throughout the entire space as white walls and doors accentuate both floors. Her desire for a place that was truly comfortable after an extended period of travel for work, was imperative. As was the cottage’s purpose to serve as a retreat for guests who need to decompress. Every element of the three-bedroom, three bathroom residence was meticulously planned because of its small square footage. But that doesn’t mean quality amenities were sacrificed – this home is big on style.

Situated just off of the kitchen is a custom-made table featuring a 100-year-old slab of wood and an authentic antler shed chandelier. The dining area’s tiny space demanded an attribute that was functional, but also cozy. Therefore, Braemyn Homes came up with the genius idea of bench seating underneath the windows. This reduction in chairs allows for storage and guest seating simultaneously.

With nature as a backdrop, it was important to Fortier to, “bring the outdoors in.” A concrete hearth and river rock stone wall, with a wood burning fireplace in the living room is the cottage’s main feature piece. However, the room’s floor-to-ceiling windows are show-stopping and lend a view to the heavens in the evening that is a stargazer’s dream.

Throughout the main level, rough wood flooring tie all the rooms together and exemplify its western elegance. A den that may also serve as a bedroom can be found off Fortier’s kitchen, as can a beautiful patio deck shielded by overhead timber frames.

Above the garage is another bedroom which Fortier often refers to as the “hotel room.” The separate space here offers a sleeping area, room for two leather lounge chairs, a sink and coffee area and a private bathroom. Complimented by a white log bed and Pendleton blankets, the exclusive guest room brings western hospitality to a whole new level.

Exquisitely crafted, Fortier’s super, cozy cottage makes all four Canadian seasons look beautiful.

“Home is so important. I never knew I could create such a beautiful place. Even though I lead a public life, I love being domestic. I love serving food and having people over,” Fortier says. “But I also like quiet moments too.I can have both of those things here.”

As it is a small home, being minimal was very important to Fortier and only her most treasured possessions embellish the cottage. The result of pairing down her belongings and living in the nature-inspired space is what she describes as therapeutic and healthy.

“I’m an aspiring minimalist. I really believe that less is more. What I kept were mostly artifacts from my Canadian Indigenous heritage and my dad, who was a cowboy,” she explains.

“I believe the natural elements really bring peace to a home,” she says. “And the whole process of the build has been very exciting for me. I have a lot of young women who come here and say, ‘I am so inspired by the fact that you designed your own home. And it’s so beautiful. I want to do the same.’”

With its natural landscaping and minimal requirement of yard maintenance, plus access to the lake and surrounding trails, Fortier’s cottage has the tranquility to elevate one’s spirits and mind. Western and nature-inspired motif complete the charm, creating a touch of elegance that fits easily with the surrounding area. Given the chance, Fortier would do it all over again.

 

Style Report, from the Calgary Stampede

Gingham tie-up shirt by Wrangler $54.95; Charlie 1 Horse hat (Gold Digger) $99.95. All provided by Lammle’s Western Wear and Tack. Turquoise provided by The Lost American Art Gallery. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

From pancakes to mini-donuts, to bulls and the midway – there are so many great things we can rely on the Calgary Stampede to deliver. And if there’s one thing we can guarantee to start conversations, it’s the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth’s spirited display of fashion. With the Canadian summer heat at its peak and a 10-day party that envelopes the city in all its chic western glory, the Stampede is the perfect outlet to bust out your fringe and denim. Not only that, anything #westernfashion is truly the distinctive outfit you’ve been looking for to make your Instagram pop!

With help from Jenna MacMillan of Lammle’s Western Wear and Tack, we’ve rounded up the top 7 western fashion trends seen at the year’s Calgary Stampede:

A Smithbilt hat with pencil roll. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

Bold hats like this Natural – Cowgirl Outlaw ($89.95)) from Charlie 1 Horse and Lammle’s Western Wear and Tack were a big deal this Stampede. Turquoise provided by The Lost American Art Gallery. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

1. Accessorize. If there’s anything this year’s Stampede taught us, it was the response of the masses to accessories! Hats were the number #1 desired item, with hats from Charlie 1 Horse flying out the doors of Lammles’ newest exclusive LWW Collection. Flat brim hats were strong, but flat-brimmed hats with a hat band and a pencil roll were THE Hat of the Stampede. People were also drawn to palm leaf styles, or any hat with a pop of color. Burgundy, bold firehouse red, exotic royal blue or anything fun and different in lids were high in demand this year. This included incorporating traditional western emblems in the brim design as well; things like a feather inlay or other fun carved leather details.

Rock & Roll Cowgirl Lace Cover-up $64.95; Ariat Denim shorts $79.95, all from Lammle’s Western Wear and Tack. Turquoise provided by The Lost American Art Gallery. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

2. Anything romantic. Interest remains in maxi-style dresses. Perhaps it was the summer heat but the Stampede saw a step away from traditional button up western blouses, to a move towards anything flow-y or Bohemian in design. A looser fit was much more on-trend than the traditional button-up style of blouses the Stampede is accustomed to seeing.

Kimes Ranch Jeans. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

3. High waist lines. While it’s safe to say that Ladies fashion was kind of all over the place this year, it’s exciting to realize the general public is finally embracing the “western side” of fashion and couture. High-waisted skirts and jeans are very popular in brands such as Wrangler right now. And the fact that companies like Wrangler and Ariat are making shorts is a trend being met with great enthusiasm. A full bottom fit (riding cut or the lower cut,) in brands such as Kimes Ranch Jeans are for certain, a strong (raw denim) trend. In regular denim other suppliers are really stepping it up in the stretch. It’s no longer about heavily-embellished pockets and seams – the trend now is more about how jeans fit and stretch. Especially in Ariat! Wrangler is going away from stitching on the pocket and finding more ways to play up the simplicity of the ‘W.’ In fact, they’re really embracing the W and showcasing the patch. It’s no longer about where we can put all the “glitz.” Denim is more streamlined and classic now.

Painted ponies wild rag, black $49.95; from Lammle’s Western Wear and Tack. Turquoise provided by The Lost American Art Gallery.  Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

4. Wild Rags. We saw a lot of people interested in vintage print wild rags this year. Super fun bold patterns are being embraced there.

Silver arrow necklace with earrings (not pictured) $29.95; Turquoise feather necklace $24.95, from Lammle’s Western Wear and Tack.  Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

5. Affordable turquoise. We found a lot of success with turquoise that was affordable. Price point is a big deal. It might not have been a true squash-bottom but anything that is crafted to look like one is hot right now.

6. Obviously, Boots. Boots and the Calgary Stampede are synonymous. The fun, turquoise styles from Lane boots were a big hit. Boots that don’t incorporate as much “sparkle” as styles used to reflect but instead rich stitching and higher quality leather are very in right now. The classic brown boot that fits higher on the leg is not going anywhere. Also, fun patterns like the serape prints from Ariat were popular. Same with anything that incorporated a bandana print into the shaft of the boot or serape pattern on the shoe.

Charlie 1 Horse Hat (Grey – Old Hag) $169.95, provided by Lammle’s Western Wear and Tack. Boots provided by Classic Rodeo Boutique. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

7. Embroidered Boots. Embroidery on boots deserves its own mention. Boots with floral or paisley embroidery were all on-trend, big time this year.

Forecasting. While we’re all loving the summer dresses right now, fall fashion we predict, will be all about great ponchos and rich wool coats this year. And we’re seeing a ton of bell sleeves! I’m talking bell sleeves on everything from a fun button-up shirt to a 3/4 length baseball tee. This is how much we might see in the trends coming around. And as for colors, certainly the mustard yellow is here to say. If you’re not on board with it now, we’re going see mustard everywhere next year.

Backyard Burgers

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

BY MIKE EDGAR, PHOTOS BY TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

These grass-fed beef burgers with smoked cheese, bacon jam, grilled red onion and roasted garlic mayo will ruin you for any future burgers to come. Nothing can compare!

Bun:
Any bun will work, however for this recipe I used a brioche bun. Pretzel is always good idea or a classic burger bun will work too.

Patty:
For these burgers, we used 100% grassfed and finished beef, BlackAngus/Wagyu cross from Bar P Ranch in Nanton. A delicious choice! Once your patties are hand-formed into eight-ounce formations, sprinkle with salt and pepper on both sides. I prefer to sear the patties in a cast iron pan and finish them in a 400-degree oven. But a grilled burger is always a good decision too. About eight minutes a side, on the Bar-be-que.

Roasted Garlic Mayonnaise:
1 cup Mayo
5 cloves Roasted Garlic
2 tbsp. Whole Grain Mustard
Juice of 1 Lemon
2 tbsp. chopped Fresh Chive
1 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. Pepper

METHOD:
Combine all ingredients in a food processor and mix.

Bacon Jam
1 lb. Bacon, chopped
1 Yellow Onion, chopped
1.5 lbs. fresh Tomato
2 tsp. Smoked Paprika
½ tsp. Red Pepper Flakes
2 tbsp. White Sugar
1 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. Ground Mustard
1 tsp. Pepper
1 tbsp. Apple Cider Vinegar

METHOD:
Fry bacon in skillet until crispy, drain the bacon from the fat, keeping two tablespoons of the fat for later. Fry the onion in the two tablespoons of bacon fat until translucent. Add the bacon and all other ingredients. Bring mixture to a boil and then reduce to a simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour stirring occasionally. Mixture should yield about two cups.

Charred Red Onion
Peel the onion and cut half inch slices. Separate the onion slices into individual rounds. Season with olive oil, salt and pepper. Grill on high heat until tender.

Lettuce
Any green lettuce will work. For this recipe, I used a butter leaf lettuce.

Cheese
Smoked blue cheese

BUILDING THE BURGER

When the patty is cooked, remove it from the heat and let it rest. At this time put on your cheese and let the remaining heat in the burger melt it.
Toast your bun.
Spread the mayo on the bottom bun. Next comes the burger and cheese, followed by the bacon jam. Then, gently place the charred red onion, followed by the lettuce and finally the top bun which also has mayo on it. Top your burger off with a skewered pickle or olive.

 

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Dig in!

Thank-you to Bar P Ranch of Nanton, AB, for providing the beef used in this recipe. 100% grassfed and finished beef, BlackAngus/Wagyu cross. For more information please visit: www.barpranchbeef.com

 

Jurassic Adventure

Discover fossils at the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre and meet the world’s largest (Guinness Record-holding) mosasaur “Bruce,” in Morden, Manitoba.

If you’re wondering what the connection is between horses and fossils, the answer will delight Jurassic Park (and World!) fans across the board. Did you know that many different horse sounds were used in the making of the original Jurassic Park movie? For instance, in the original movie (which is now one of 5 box-office hits) introduced us to intelligence of the Velociraptor. Do you remember the part when the Raptor appeared in the door of the kitchen, breathing terrifyingly on the glass window in pursuit of the two kids? The breathing noise was the recorded sounds of a horse.

And that wasn’t the only usage of Equid sounds in the movie.

The Gallimimus flock sounds like a stampede of wild horses. The squeal the Gallimimuses make when they’re passing by the actors who marvel at their likeness to a “flock of birds, evading a predator,” are actually a recorded mare in heat. Same goes for the squeal the ill-fated one at the end of the sequence makes when it’s attacked by a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

The brachiosaur’s singing is made from the unique sound a donkey, slowed down into a “song-like” sound. And in case you were wondering about the Triceratops
 – a lot of cow noises were used to animate that species in the movie.

So for all you Jurassic World fans – did you know that we have the largest Guinness World Record-holding Mosasaur in Morden, Manitoba? He even has a name! In 1974 “Bruce” was discovered north of Thornhill within the Pembina Member of the Pierre Shale Formation. Bruce lived during the late Cretaceous period, approximately 80 million years ago. He swam in a deep sea environment with numerous other marine reptiles. It took approximately two field seasons to excavate the skeleton, which was reasonably complete with 65-70% of the original bones.

Aaaaaand we have Bruce featured in the July/August issue of Western Horse Review, as part of our #HaveHorsesWillTravel feature! If you’re headed to the Manitoba Stampede & Exhibition this July 19-22, the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre (which features Bruce, Suzy and a rare new mosasaur skeleton coming July 25!) is only roughly 74 kms away.

The incredible new mosasaur skeleton coming to the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre (CFDC) is of a rare species known as Kourisodon puntledgensis, or razor-toothed mosasaur of the Puntledge River. It’s a unique species whose fossils have only been found in Canada and Japan. The new addition further establishes the CFDC as one of the world’s foremost collections of mosasaur.

“This addition has been a long time in the planning stages and we are very excited to see it finally come to fruition,” said CFDC executive director Peter Cantelon. “People will notice right away this is a very different mosasaur from Bruce and Suzy – particularly its ferocious, razor-like teeth.”

 

Calgary Stampede 2018 Winners

Ryder Wright scored a career high 93 points on Stampede Warrior to become the $100,000 Saddle Bronc Champion. Photo by Shellie Scott Photography.

Showdown Sunday at the Calgary Stampede is known as the ‘Richest Day in Rodeo.’ After nine days of battling it out in the rodeo arena, winners of each event  took home a cheque for $100-thousand dollars.

Here are your 2018 winners:

SADDLE BRONC: Ryder Wright of Milford, Utah, scored a career high 93 points on Stampede Warrior to become the $100,000 Saddle Bronc Champion.

BAREBACK RIDING: Richie Champion of Dublin, Texas, rode Virgil to the championship of the $100,000 Bareback title.

BULL RIDING: Marcos Gloria of Brazil is the $100,000 Bull Riding champion.

STEER WRESTLING: Matt Reeves of Cross Plains, Texas, won the $100,000 in the steer wrestling with a time of 4.7 seconds.

BARREL RACING: Hailey Kinsel, Cotulla, Texas, and her horse Sister are your $100,000 champions with a time of 17.078.

TIE DOWN ROPING: Tuf Cooper, Weatherford, TX, is the $100,000 Tie Down Roping Champion.

GMC RANGELAND DERBY: Kurt Bensmiller, Dewberry, AB, wins the Dash for Cash at the Calgary Stampede.

Hailey Kinsel and her horse, Sister dominated the competition every day they were up. They are your $100,000 champions. Photo by Shellie Scott Photography.

 

Tuf Cooper is the $100,000 Tie Down Roping Champion. Photo by Shellie Scott Photography.

 

Marcos Gloria of Brazil is the $100,000 Bull Riding champion. Photo by Shellie Scott Photography.

 

Kurt Bensmiller, Dewberry, AB, wins the Dash for Cash at the Calgary Stampede. Photo by Shellie Scott Photography.

 

 

Beauty in Chaos

“Take your life and make it the best story in the world. Don’t waste that opportunity.”

 

I’ll be honest. I’m currently sitting in my car composing my latest Publisher’s Note, watching my kids from afar in a bouncy castle at a birthday party. They’re having a ball. They’re safe. And the opportunity affords me a chance to truly be present in this moment of writing. That’s when a brutal thunderstorm rips in and threatens the bouncy castle’s very existence. The kids don’t want to abandon their fun. Time to shut my laptop, find their shoes and force them indoors.

The entire thing makes me laugh. As though it’s a euphemism of my current life.

Lightening and thunder roar – the kids would rather be blown away in a plastic toy than miss out on a moment of childhood joy.

Trying to balance the many facets of business while raising a family and maintaining some semblance of an extra-curricular life, is tough. Any mom-prenuer will tell you that. Aside from being “Mom” and owning a business, I also happen to have 50 horses in my backyard where my husband conducts his business. A calendar full of horse shows to keep up with and a house full of varied pets. (Have I told you about the leopard gecko and more recently, bunnies?)

There are other things too. Hashtag, Life

Sometimes I simply have to give myself permission to choose progress over perfection. No one can balance it all. There are months that pass without any time spent in the saddle. Times when the laundry pile goes untouched and is traded for late night shifts at my computer. Days when dry shampoo is the solution for picking up the kids on time. And afternoons when I have to skip soccer with my family, just so I can finish up my assignments.

I believe in working. I don’t think it makes me a lesser mother, or lesser in business. I think being a mother makes me try harder. I am better as an entrepreneur, because of my kids. As we live rurally, being an entrepreneur also allows me to contribute to the family income without leaving the farm. Best of all, I can authorize myself an afternoon off to volunteer at school or go watch a talent show where our daughter has advanced to the second round. Lord knows, I’ve probably logged 40+ hours over time in the last month leading up to a press date.

Still, there are days when I feel weary and worn out and surrounded by nothing but stress and deadlines. Then, there’s the mom guilt… I bet there isn’t a mom-preneur out there who can’t relate.

At times such as those, I draw strength from my family. The following quote popped up on my Insta feed the other day and it really struck a chord:

Love your damn life. Take pictures of everything. Tell people you love them. Talk to random strangers. Do things you’re scared to do. Screw it, because so many of us die and no one remembers a thing we did. Take your life and make it the best story in the world. Don’t waste that opportunity.

Love your damn life.

I do. And I will never apologize for taking too many pictures.

I’ve learned a lot in the last little while. There’s clarity in the haze. And there’s beauty in the chaos.

Just like all those precious children running barefoot from the bouncy castle.

– JW

2018 Wild Rose Welsh & Open Pony Show

Welsh Mountain Pony 2-year-old colt, Sunburst Heart of Jubilee (Sunwillow Jubilee x Young’s Heart Breaker) was the 2017 Supreme Champion Welsh. Shown and owned by Kasandra Miller. Michelle Walerius Photography.


2018 Wild Rose Welsh & Open Pony Show
Centered on Welsh. Open to all.
Date: August 10-12, 2018
Location: Amberlea Meadows Equestrian Centre, Leduc County, Alberta
Website: www.piperp13.wixsite.com/wildroseshow (all show forms found here)

This is a family-friendly show with competitive and fun classes for all ages and skill levels. A variety of in-hand, riding, and driving classes are offered—from Welsh breed, Sport Pony, and Model Hunter halter classes to English, Western, Hunter, Sidesaddle, and gymkhana ridden classes to driving, trail, showmanship, and costume.

Berrylyn Alexi, 15-year-old Half-Welsh mare (Alvesta Folklore x TH Centrefold), 2017 Grand Champion Sport Pony and Half-Welsh breed class winner. Owner: Nancy Haverstock; handler: Eliza Haverstock. Michelle Walerius Photography.

Classes for Welsh Ponies and Cobs, alongside many open classes—registered and unregistered ponies and horses are most welcome.

Judges:

– India Baker (Waterford Welsh Cobs, ME): Sat – Sun double-judged show
– Karen MacLeay (Seldom Rest Farm, CA): Sat – Sun double-judged show
– Kathy MacLeay (Seldom Rest Farm, CA): Friday Young Stock Futurity & Performance Stake
Sarah Lindsay Miller of Sarah’s Equine Design will be the show photographer.

Join us on Facebook for show announcements: www.facebook.com/WildRoseShow

 

Alvesta Sedona, yearling Welsh Section B (Llanarth Tarquin x Alvesta Fairy Lustre) was 2017 overall Welsh Gelding Champion. Owned by Alvesta Farm; shown by Karen Podolski. Michelle Walerius Photography.

Internal Parasites and Your Barn Cat

By Dr. Bronwyn Atkinson & Jennifer Council of Barrett Veterinary Practice

Barn cats are an integral part of a farm/acreage environment and play an important role in rodent population control. Hardworking barn cats can be very useful to keep rodent populations in check as well as a pleasure to have around. So, how can we keep these kitties healthy and best equipped to do their jobs? In this blog, we will go into more detail about diseases that commonly affect barn cats and the different ways we can keep them healthy and performing at their best.

Internal Parasites in Cats

Roundworms: Roundworms are the most common internal parasite found in cats – kittens often carry more due to their age and young immune systems.  Adult roundworms are about 3-5 inches in length, off-white in colour and live in the cat’s intestines.

Kittens often carry more round worms due to their age and young immune systems.

A mature worm lays its eggs in the intestines where they can be passed in the cats’ feces. Once out in the environment the eggs mature into larvae and infect new cats. Rodents also carry these larvae in their tissues – infecting cats, which are hunting. Roundworms can cause disease in people, especially those with weaker immune systems. It is rare, but if there are numbers of larvae in the environment and they are ingested, they can migrate around human tissues trying to find a good place to settle, causing serious health problems.

Hookworms: Cats can be infected with hookworm larvae when they burrow through their skin – usually the paw pads. Infestation also occurs when a cat eats a rodent that is carrying hookworms in its tissues. These worms are about 1/2-inch in length and live in the intestines. Young worms burrow into the lining of the intestine, whereas adult worms use their hooked mouthparts to anchor into the intestinal lining where they suck blood. Heavy hookworm infection can cause cats to have poor growth, poor hair coat, diarrhea, anemia and even death from blood loss. Hookworms can also migrate into human skin, causing irritation and need for medical attention – luckily, this is rare as humans are not the hookworm’s preferred hosts.

Tapeworms: These are long, ribbon-like worms with bodies made up of egg-containing segments. These worms live in the cat’s small intestine and use their heads to hook onto the lining of the gut. The segments at the worm’s tail end mature first, break off and are passed in the cat’s feces. These segments can also sometimes be seen around the cat’s anus or tail area and look like rice grains if they are fresh, or sesame seeds if they are dried. Cats can pick up tapeworms by eating rodents that carry them, or by ingesting fleas that can also carry tapeworms. Adult tapeworms in the gastrointestinal tract are usually harmless to the cats. However, the younger tapeworm life stages that is shed by cats can cause cysts in organs such as the liver of horses, cows and pigs.

Echinococcus multilocularis is one specific kind of tapeworm that lives like the others, spending part of their life cycle inside a rodent, often being eaten by carnivores along with its host. They mature to an adult tapeworm in the carnivore’s gut and if ingested by people can cause significant disease by causing cysts that multiply and damage internal human organs.

Combating Feline Parasites

If you’re concerned about parasites your barn cats may be carrying, here’s a list of things you can do:
• Wash your hands after touching barn cats.
• Clean up any feces as well as dead rodent carcasses, to keep the environment as clean as possible.
• De-worm your cats routinely.

There are 2 types of de-wormer that Barrett Veterinary Practice prescribes; Profender, and Advantage Multi. Both are liquids that are applied to the back of a cat’s neck. This application is much easier than trying to pill a shy, barn cat that may not be used to handling!

Profender works to kill roundworms, hookworms and tapeworms.
Advantage Multi kills hookworms, roundworms, fleas and ear mites.

As these products have action against different internal parasites, it is a really good idea to alternate using them. Cats that are actively mousing need to be dewormed every three months. Good parasite control is key to ensuring a healthy barn cat and preventing disease in other species as well.