The Richest 2-Year-Old Futurity in Canada

Competitors come from across Canada to compete at the Manitoba Superhorse 50/50. Photo Credit: Marohn Images

The Manitoba Superhorse 50/50, held in Brandon, Manitoba, is an innovative futurity format that celebrates the Quarter Horse breed and is billed as the richest two year old western horse futurity in Canada. The organization has been running successfully for the past 27 years and continues to grow with exhibitors coming across Canada for a chance to take home a piece of the pie. The concept of the Superhorse organization is to promote and enhance the versatility and quality of today’s young horses.

The show brings competitors, breeders and buyers to the same venue. Photo Credit: Photo Credit: Marohn Images

The 50/50 concept is based around the support of loyal breeders and buyers. Breeders bring their good weanlings to the foal sale held in conjunction with the futurity each year. Buyers then pack the stands and bid on the weanling they think will come back to win the futurity two years later. That is where the 50/50 concept comes into play, 50% of the selling price goes to the consignor of the eanling, and 50% of the selling price of the weanlings sold is retained by the organization and used as operating expenses, purse and breeder/consignor awards in the 2 year old futurity. At the futurity itself 40% of the 50% above of the selling price of the weanling will go to the 2 year old futurity purse, 5% goes to breeder/consignor awards and 5% goes to operate costs – meaning every one is celebrated during the event.

Photo Credit: Marohn Images

The Manitoba Super Horse 50/50 also features a special aspect of the sale, the “Ghost Slot”. The ghost slot will be the second horse to go through the sale, it is open to both members and non-members and the buyer of the slot must be the breeder of record of this foal. The full selling price of the ghost slot will go back into the pot and will be eligible for futurity money, as well as awards except for the consignor awards.

Photo Credit: Marohn Images

The futurity itself consists of a confirmation class, rail class and pattern class. Exhibitors show for two days in each of these classes then the points are accumulated to produce a winner. Weanlings that were sold at the 2015, 2016 and 2017 sale are eligible to win a guaranteed $10,000 for first place in 2017, 2018 and 2019 given the great success of the sales.

Photo Credit: Marohn Images

Each year the Manitoba Super Horse 50/50 is held in the fall and in partnership with the Manitoba AG EX, in Brandon, Manitoba. In 2017 Jessica Bartram of Medicine Hat, Alberta walked away with top honours on her horse, Styled By Impulsions, originally consigned by Little Valley Q.H.’s, Ltd. Styled By Impulsions (Impulsions By Mail x Autumn Invitation) and Bartram won the High Point Amateur, Rail and Pattern, which earned them the highest amount of points for the 50/50. The team walked away with a saddle, blanket, and of course the hotly contested $10,000.

Photo Credit: Marohn Images

Only One Design was the reserve champion, owned by Barry Foote of Sandy Land Stables, and trained and ridden by Jason Lamb. Only One Design (One N Only x Dynamically Designed) was the ghost slot entry in 2015 and took home High Point Open, which earned the team a buckle, as well as $4,972.74.

Photo Credit: Marohn Images

 

Bounce Back Night for Canadian Cowboys

COURTESY OF THE CANADIAN PROFESSIONAL RODEO ASSOCIATION

December 11, 2017

After a couple of sub-par nights, Team Canada bounced back with a strong performance in the fifth go-round of the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. Five members of the nine-man Canadian contingent cashed cheques, making this easily their best night to date.

It was a case of saving the best for the last as two-time Canadian Steer Wrestling Champion, Tanner Milan, was 3.8 seconds on the last steer in the round to pick up his second go-round win and the $26,320 first place cheque. The win moved the Cochrane, Alberta man to 4th place in both the average and the world standings.

“I just have to keep running at it every night,” Milan noted. “I can’t back off. The horse I’m riding, Maverick who belongs to Tom Lewis, has been getting my feet on the ground really fast and I just have to stay aggressive.”

Ty Erickson, the Montana cowboy, continues to lead the world standings but Milan has moved to within $63,000 of the leader with five rounds and the all-important average still to be decided. Provost, Alberta bulldogger, Scott Guenthner checked in with a 6.6 second run and was out of the money. Guenthner sits in 10th place on the world leaderboard.

You know the pen of bareback horses is pretty sweet when 87.5 is good for only a 5/6 split. That was the case in go-round number five of the 2017 WNFR. Canadian cowboy Orin Larsen was that guy on this night as he matched up with Wilson Sanchez from the Hi Lo ProRodeo Company. The horse, born and raised near Rocky Mountain House, actually came from the Hollingsworth family of Eckville and to add to the intrigue, Larsen’s sister is married to a Hollingsworth. You know Central Alberta was cheering for the Manitoba man who is at his third WNFR. Larsen has placed in four of five rounds for over $56,000 won and sits in fifth place in both the average and the world standings.

Santaquin, Utah cowboy, Mason Clements, won the round with an 89 point ride while Tim O’Connell maintained his big lead at the top of the standings. Jake Vold whose 85 score wasn’t quite enough to get into the money, has dropped back to fourth place in the world standings behind the seemingly unstoppable Tim O’Connell, Richmond Champion and Tanner Aus.

You knew it was just a matter of time for Jeremy Buhler. And tonight was the time. The defending world champion and his WNFR partner, Arizona header, Tom Richards. posted a 4.0 to catch a 3/4 split in the round and a pair of $13,326 cheques. It was the first qualified time and the first payday for the duo that was thrown together when Buhler’s longtime partner Levi Simpson just missed qualifying for this year’s WNFR. Erich Rogers and Cory Petska split the round with Clay Tryan and Jade Corkill. The 3.9 second result took Rogers and Petska, the Arizona superstars, to a narrow lead in the world standings.

Things finally went the way Canadian saddle bronc riding fans thought they’d go right from the start as the reigning world champion, Zeke Thurston and 2017 Canadian Champion, Layton Green were part of a fifth go-round 2/3/4 split. Both cowboys cashed cheques for $15,794 and for Thurston it meant he was able to gain a little ground on the season leader, Jacobs Crawley.

The Big valley, Alberta 23 year-old’s ride on Wound Up, the 2017 Saddle Bronc of the Year, enabled him to climb back into second place in the world standings ahead of CoBurn Bradshaw, the third place man who leads the all-important average. For Green, the Meeting Creek, Alberta man, it was his first cheque of this – his first WNFR. The third Canadian, 2016 Canadian Champion, Clay Elliott finished out of the money in the go round with an 80-point ride. C5 Rodeo’s Double D won the Rank Horse of the Night award as he parted company with Jake Wright before the eight second horn.

Tie Down Roper, Marty Yates, turned in the fastest run of this WNFR at 7.0 seconds flat for the go-round win with season leader Tuf Cooper just one tick back at 7.1. It was a critical run for Cooper as he was able to put some space between him and second place man, Marcos Costa, and Trevor Brazile who had been closing fast on the leader and now sits third. Costa, the Brazilian roper, leads the average with Trevor Brazile second and Cooper right behind. Cooper’s run tonight also tightened the race for the All-Around title where he and brother-in-law, Brazile, are duking it out as well with Brazile holding a $47,000 lead over Cooper.

And in the barrel race, Colorado cowgirl, Ivy Conrado and four time Canadian Champion, Lisa Lockhart of Oelrichs, South Dakota split the round, both with 13.59 runs. Season leader, Tiany Schuster, had her fastest run of the Finals with a 13.90 but for the fifth night in a row, was out of the money. Schuster who sits 6th in the average has to be feeling the heat just a little as three or four cowgirls are all mounting a charge at the Krum, Texas cowgirl who was so dominant throughout the regular season.

2016 Canadian Bull Riding Champion, Jordan Hansen, of Calgary bucked off a tough outlaw called Crime Boss from Universal Rodeo. The result leaves Hansen at 1 for 5 at the midway point of the rodeo. Meanwhile Sage Steele Kimzey is starting to distance himself from the field as he pursues a fourth consecutive title. Kimzey, who hails from Strong City, Texas, rode Beutler and Son’s Shootin’ Stars to 89 points and the round win. He sits second in the average to fellow-Texan, Trey Benton III who bucked off for the first time on Monday night.

Lonnie West Rides Perfect in Abbotsford to Earn First PBR Victory

Courtesy of PBR Canada

Lonnie West rides Tippin Point in Round 1 of Stop No.5 of the PBR Monster Energy Tour in Abbotsford, BC. Photo by Covy Moore / CovyMoore.com

West rises from No. 10 to No. 5 in Canadian standings as the tour prepares to crown a PBR Canadian Champion next week in Saskatoon.

ABBOTSFORD, British Columbia – Building upon his runner-up finish last weekend in Winnipeg, Lonnie West delivered a perfect 2-for-2 performance in Abbotsford to claim his first career PBR victory at the final regular season event of PBR Canada’s Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K.

West (Cadogan, Alberta) began the Saturday night event with a fifth place effort in Round 1, riding Tippin Point (S&E Bucking Bulls) for 84 points.

In the championship round, the 21-year-old delivered the high-marked ride of his PBR career, making the 8 aboard Anika’s Pet (Big Chief/Armstrong) for 89 points.

His victory earned him $4,260.80, 465 Canadian points and 80 world points.

After beginning the event ranked No.10 in the Canadian standings, West is now the No.5 man in the race for the national title as the tour heads to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan next weekend, Oct. 20-21, for the PBR Canada Monster Energy Tour Finals.

He now trails No.1 Brock Radford (De Winton, Alberta) by 751.66 points.

Radford finished ninth in Abbotsford, earning 20 Canadian points, after riding Hollow Point (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 83.5 points in Round 1.

Zane Lambert (Westbourne, Manitoba) and Jared Parsonage (Maple Creek, Saskatchewan) tied for second after logging matching 169.50-point scores in the aggregate.

Lambert’s event began in Round 1 with an 82.5-point ride on Boom Beach (S&E Bucking Bulls), which he followed with 87 points aboard Spot On (Wilson Rodeo) in the championship round.

The 31-year-old earned $2,405.29, 170 Canadian points and 40 world points.

The 2013 PBR Canada Champion, ranked No.2 in the national standings, now trails No.1 Radford by 379.16 points as he looks to earn his second Canadian title.

After earning a re-ride, Parsonage logged 82 points on Big Rig (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) in the event’s first round.

He concluded the Abbotsford stop with an 87.5-point trip aboard Kalit Karma (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) in the championship round.

For his work Parsonage earned $2,611.46, 180 Canadian points and 40 world points.

Parsonage rose from No.8 to No.7 in PBR Canada standings, now 909.16 points off the No.1 position.

Fresh off his event win last weekend in Winnipeg, Dakota Louis (Browning, Montana) finished fourth after opening his night with a Round 1 win compliments of his 88.5-point ride aboard Overcooked (Vold Rodeo/Prescott).

He leaves Abbotsford with $2,552.55, 160 Canadian national points and 20 world points.

Kale Marks (Sunnybrook, Alberta) rounded out the Top 5, earning $1,195.77, 105 Canadian  points and 15 world points.

His finish was backed by his 86.5-point trip aboard Tweedle Dee (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) in Round 1.

PBR Canada’s Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K next travels to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and the SaskTel Centre on Oct. 20-21 for the twelfth annual PBR Canada Finals. Action gets underway at 7:30 p.m. CT on both Friday and Saturday. Tickets are still available at PBRCanada.com or Ticketmaster.ca.

The event will crown the 2017 PBR Canada Champion who will earn a trip to the Real Time Pain Relief Velocity Tour Finals in Las Vegas, Nevada Oct. 28-30 where they will then have the opportunity to qualify for the Built Ford Tough World Finals on Nov. 1-5.

Be sure to stay tuned to PBRCanada.com and follow the tour on Facebook (PBR Canada), Twitter (@PBRCanada), and Instagram (@PBRCanada) for the latest results

Dakota Louis Sweeps Both Rounds to Win PBR Monster Energy Tour in Winnipeg

Courtesy of PBR Canada

Dakota Louis rides Minion Stuart for 87.5 points in the Championship Round. Photo: Covy Moore / CovyMoore.com

Five riders went a perfect 2-for-2, including home province hopeful Zane Lambert, now ranked No.2 in the PBR Canada national standings

WINNIPEG, Manitoba – Sweeping both Round 1 and the short go, Dakota Louis (Browning, Montana) earned his first event win of the season Friday night at the Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K event at Bell MTS Place in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

The 25-year-old began the night riding Smash (Skori Bucking Bulls) for 85 points in Round 1, before covering Minion Stuart (Skori Bucking Bulls) for 87.5 points as the last rider in the championship round.

The bovine athlete, who hadn’t been ridden in his last three outs, was recently selected by PBR Livestock Director Cody Lambert as one of the five Canadian bulls that will buck at this year’s PBR World Finals in Las Vegas, Nevada on Nov. 1-5.

The win marked Louis’ first title since June 2016 when he won the Touring Pro Division event in Belt, Montana.

Louis’ perfect 2-for-2 performance earned him 80 world points and $8,222.50.

Notching his second runner-up finish of the year, Lonnie West (Cadogan, Alberta) leaves Manitoba’s capital city $5,922.50 richer, having earned 50 world and 270 Canadian points.

In Round 1 the 21-year-old tied for second after making the 8 aboard Ulterra’s Counter Force (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls) for 84.5 points.

In the short go West logged his high-marked ride of the season, covering Heaven’s Basement (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 87.5 points to split the round win with Louis.

West, who began the night No.14 in the Canadian  national standings, rose four positions to No.10 compliments of the finish. He now trails No.1 Brock Radford (De Winton, Alberta) by 1,196.66.

Radford failed to earn any points in Winnipeg, bucking off Milky Chance (Flying Four Bucking Bulls) in Round 1 at the 4.31-second mark.

Zane Lambert (Westbourne, Manitoba) and Cody Casper (Pacific, Washington) tied for third after recording matching scores in both rounds.

The duo opened the night scoring 84.5 points aboard their first round draws. 2013 PBR Canada Champion Lambert became the first rider to cover All Gold Everything (Vold Rodeo/Prescott), while Casper made the 8 aboard Marshals Law (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls).

In the championship round Lambert and Casper both earned scores of 85 points after riding Tykro Liquid Fire (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls) and Finning Mr. Ripley (Flying Four Bucking Bulls) respectively.

Each rider earned $2,875, 25 world and 165 Canadian points.

For Lambert the finish allowed him to surpass Cody Coverchuk (Meadow Lake, Saskatchewan) in the PBR Canada national standings, where he now finds himself ranked No.2, 529.16 behind No.1 Radford, as he looks to earn his second national title.

Coverchuk, much like Radford, also failed to earn any points in Winnipeg after bucking off Double Major (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls) in 2.43 seconds in the first round.

Casper also climbed the rankings in the PBR Canada title race, surpassing Jordan Hansen (Okotoks, Alberta) and rising from No.5 to No.4 in the standings. He now trails the top spot by 722.50 points.

Todd Chotowetz (Major, Saskatchewan) rounded out the Top 5, earning $1,656, 15 world and 95 Canadian points.

The Saskatchewan rider was the final athlete to deliver a perfect 2-for-2 performance after covering Brick Wall (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 82 points in the first round, and Whiskey Hand (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 85.5 points in the short go.

First Buckle (Rafter 8 Bulls) was the high-marked bull of the event, earning a bull score of 44 points after dumping Armando Davila Rodriguez (Saltillo, Mexico) in 1.75 seconds in the championship round.

PBR Canada’s Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K next travels to Abbotsford, British Columbia and the Abbotsford Centre on Oct. 14 for the final regular season event of the year. Action gets underway at 7:30 p.m. PT. Tickets are still available at PBRCanada.com or Ticketmaster.ca.

Be sure to stay tuned to PBRCanada.com and follow the tour on Facebook (PBR Canada), Twitter (@PBRCanada), and Instagram (@PBRCanada) for the latest results.

 

2017 Wild Rose Welsh and Open Pony Show

Written by: Karen Podolski

For Welsh owners and breeders, the Wild Rose Welsh & Open Pony Show is the largest Welsh show in Western Canada in 2017. It is a three-in-one opportunity: the Friday futurity has one judge and then the main show on Saturday to Sunday is double-judged. The show also includes a large number of halter and performance classes that are open to all breeds.

Pleasure Driving Champion, English Pleasure Champion, and Section A Reserve Senior Champion: Coyote Run Frezno six-year-old Welsh Mountain Pony stallion. Photo Credit: Michelle Walerius Photograph.

The Welsh and Half-Welsh Young Stock Futurity and Performance Stake took place on Friday, July 14, judged by Heather Black of Blackwood Farm in Ontario. Champion English Pleasure and Pleasure Driving winner was six-year-old Welsh Mountain Pony Stallion, Coyote Run Frezno (Anderin’s Caerwynne x Young’s Golden Fascination by Liseter Star Design), owned by Kerry Marit of Marit Stables, Cochrane AB. Marit says, “Frezno isn’t a typical stallion, in that he lives with a gelding, Emery, who is his best friend; many don’t realize he’s a stallion.” Marit chooses ponies based on their exceptional temperaments because at her facility she says, they have to be around a myriad of kids, dogs, donkeys, grandparents, and really anything you can think of. “All of the ponies are picked because they have that personality combined with good conformation and frankly they are the “dream pony” we wished we had as kids.”

Futurity Supreme Champion and Grand Champion Sport Pony: Alvesta Infinity, two-year-old Welsh Mountain Pony colt. Photo Credit: Michelle Walerius Photography.

Following the futurity performance classes for ponies aged three to eight are the young stock classes, for Welsh and Half-Welsh two years of age and under. Futurity Champion Section A, as well as Futurity Supreme Welsh and Grand Champion Sport Pony all went to Alvesta Infinity (Cat Creek Innuendo x Alvesta Caris by *Nerwyn Gwyn), a two year old colt owned by Alvesta Farm. Judge, Heather Black, said that he had “a lovely head, was well balanced, and had free-flowing movement.”

Marit V.I.P (Coyote Run Frezno x Bar C Ban-na-righ by *Skellorn Dauphinoir) owned by Kerry Marit took home the Futurity Grand Champion Section B, and Futurity Reserve Supreme Welsh.

Judge Heather Black said, “The show featured lovely ponies overall, and the owners should be proud of what they are producing.”

Supreme Champion Welsh and Res. Grand Champion Sport Pony: Coyote Run Enya, 3-year-old Welsh Mountain Pony mare. Photo Credit: Michelle Walerius Photography.

The main show on Saturday and Sunday was officiated by Patricia Cochran of Lochinvar Welsh in Oregon and Hilary Tolhurst of Cwmfelen Welsh in Ontario.

The highest champions of the Wild Rose Welsh and Open Pony show were the Supreme Champions, and this year they did not dissapoint. Supreme Champion Welsh under Patricia Cochran went to Brenda Harder’s three-year-old grey mare, Coyote Run Enya (Tillybo Casanova x Coyote Run Esper by Anderin’s Caerwynne). Patricia says Enya is “a stunning young mare, feminine, brimming with breed type, and a ‘look-at-me’ presence! I especially liked her great legs: straight, flat boned, short cannons, with good muscling. Enya is a well-balanced mare with free movement, a beautiful well set-on neck, good topline and powerful hip. She is a beautiful example of a Section A Mountain Pony.”

Supreme Champion and Res. Grand Champion Sport Pony: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, 2-year-old Welsh Mountain Pony colt. Photo Credit: Michelle Walerius Photography.

Kasandra Miller’s two-year-old palomino Welsh Mountain Pony, Sunburst Heart of Jubilee (Sunwillow Jubilee x Young’s Heart Breaker by Young’s Country Rock), had a successful Saturday show under both judges, though Hilary Tolhurst gave the colt Supreme Champion Welsh. Hilary says, “My choice for Supreme Champion was a very nicely put together pony with a good topline, substance, movement, and with the presence of a true Welsh Mountain Pony. He was also my choice for sport pony—with a pony like this you have the basis of your sport pony breeding and competition, having bone, movement, and quality to either produce quality or to compete himself.”

More championship results are detailed below. A huge thanks to all of the Wild Rose Welsh & Open Pony Show’s exhibitors, sponsors, and volunteers who made the show possible.

The Wild Rose Welsh and Open Pony Show would like to thank the 2017 breeder/owner sponsors, who contributed to the show: ​Marit Stables/Kerry Marit, Alvesta Farm/Brenda Podolski (plus John & Mary), Rosegarland Welsh/Muriel & Dave Hill, Airth Farms Ltd./Linda Airth, Crignant Welsh/MaryAnn Isaacson & Elizabeth Eddington, SilverViews Welsh/Stacey Schaber, Wendy & Don Williams, Coyote Run Welsh Mountain Ponies/Brenda Harder, Elana Turner, Exeter Farm/Karen & Dean Chorney, Shannon Czajko, Tyalow Acres/Judy Owad and Nancy Haverstock.

As well, thank the wonderful companies and organizations giving back to their community through sponsorship: ​Welsh Pony & Cob Society of Canada, Trustori Inc, Saddle Up Magazine, Greenhawk Equestrian Sport, From Field to Show, Sweet Water Leather Care, Flashpoint Thermography, Horse-Canada, Hoffman’s Horse Products, Therapy Connection, BioEquine, The Chocolate Palomino, and Tail Spin Bracelets.

Res. Supreme Champion Welsh and Grand Champion Sport Pony: Pajon’s Royal Illusion, 11-year-old Welsh Section B stallion. Photo Credit: Michelle Walerius Photography.

Champions under Patricia Cochran

Welsh Gelding Champion: Alvesta Sedona, Alvesta Farm
Welsh Gelding Reserve Champion: Menai Step-On, Stacey Schaber

Section B Junior Champion: Arnaby Eloquence, Muriel Hill
Section B Reserve Junior Champion: Alvesta Sakari, Alvesta Farm

Section A Junior Champion: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller
Section A Reserve Junior Champion: Coyote Run Erdyne, Brenda Harder

WELSH YOUNG STOCK CHAMPION: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller
RESERVE WELSH YOUNG STOCK CHAMPION: Arnaby Eloquence, Muriel Hill

Section B Senior Champion: Alvesta Ever After, Alvesta Farm
Section B Reserve Senior Champion: Pajon’s Royal Illusion, Donna O’Neil

Section A Senior Champion: Coyote Run Enya, Brenda Harder
Section A Reserve Senior Champion: Coyote Run Frezno, Kerry Marit

SUPREME CHAMPION: Coyote Run Enya, Brenda Harder
RESERVE SUPREME CHAMPION: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller

Sport Pony Junior Champion: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller
Sport Pony Reserve Junior Champion: Alvesta Maya, Wendy Williams

Sport Pony Senior Champion: Berrylyn Alexi, Nancy Haverstock
Sport Pony Reserve Senior Champion: Coyote Run Enya, Brenda Harder

GRAND CHAMPION SPORT PONY: Berrylyn Alexi, Nancy Haverstock
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION SPORT PONY: Coyote Run Enya, Brenda Harder

PLEASURE DRIVING CHAMPION: Menai Step-On, Stacey Schaber
PLEASURE DRIVING RESERVE CHAMPION: Evans Brockton Mountain, Muriel Hill

GRAND CHAMPION MODEL HUNTER PONY: Marsh Haven Fiona, Donna O’Neil
RES. GRAND CHAMPION MODEL HUNTER PONY: Alvesta Everlasting, Alvesta Farm

Champions under Hilary Tolhurst

Welsh Gelding Champion: Rosegarland Royal Troubadour, Tiffanie Hutnan
Welsh Gelding Reserve Champion: Alvesta Sedona, Alvesta Farm

Section B Junior Champion: Alvesta Sakari, Alvesta Farm
Section B Reserve Junior Champion: Alvesta Everlasting, Alvesta Farm

Section A Junior Champion: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller
Section A Reserve Junior Champion: Alvesta Infinity, Alvesta Farm

WELSH YOUNG STOCK CHAMPION: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller
RESERVE WELSH YOUNG STOCK CHAMPION: Alvesta Infinity, Alvesta Farm

Section B Senior Champion: Pajon’s Royal Illusion, Donna O’Neil
Section B Reserve Senior Champion: Alvesta Ever After, Alvesta Farm

Section A Senior Champion: Silverpine Jubilee, Stacey Schaber
Section A Reserve Senior Champion: Coyote Run Enya, Brenda Harder

SUPREME CHAMPION: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller
RESERVE SUPREME CHAMPION: Pajon’s Royal Illusion

Sport Pony Junior Champion: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller
Sport Pony Reserve Junior Champion: Alvesta Everlasting, Alvesta Farm

Sport Pony Senior Champion: Pajon’s Royal Illusion, Donna O’Neil
Sport Pony Reserve Senior Champion: Porsha, Quindy Watts

GRAND CHAMPION SPORT PONY: Pajon’s Royal Illusion, Donna O’Neil
RES. GRAND CHAMPION SPORT PONY: Sunburst Heart of Jubilee, Kasandra Miller

PLEASURE DRIVING CHAMPION: Coyote Run Frezno, Kerry Marit
PLEASURE DRIVING RESERVE CHAMPION: Evans Brockton Mountain, Muriel Hill

GRAND CHAMPION MODEL HUNTER PONY: Marsh Haven Fiona, Donna O’Neil
RES. GRAND CHAMPION MODEL HUNTER PONY: Alvesta Maya, Wendy Williams

Pleasure Driving Champion & Res. Welsh Gelding Champion: Menai Step-On 10-year-old Welsh Mountain Pony. Photo Credit: Michelle Walerius Photography

 

That’s a Rodeo Wrap

Three nights, seven events and 21 champions at the inaugural K-Days Rodeo Photo Credit: Northlands

Day three of the K-Days Rodeo wraps up a successful, record-tying weekend at Northlands Coliseum. All athletes, two and four-legged, put on a great show and ensured a few more fans of the sport will return for the Canadian Finals Rodeo this November. Award-winning country artist Corb Lund sang the National Anthem and got the crowd set for a great night of action. It was a memorable start to a night of jam packed, rodeo-action. The final seven athletes titled champions included:

Bareback Riding:
Winner: JR Vezain
Stock: CS D39 Make Up Face

Bull Riding:
Winner: Sage Kimzy
Stock: C5B 1102 Bid Dip

Saddlebronc Riding:
Winner: Zeke Thurston
Stock: NS 242 Get Smart

Team Roping:
Winner: Dustin Bird & Russell Cardoza
Score: 402

Tie-Down Roping:
Winner: Tuf Cooper
Score: 8.1

Steer Wrestling:
Winner: Straws Milan
Score: 2.9

Ladies Barrel Racing:
Winner: Crystal Christman
Score: 14.726

All weekend long these cowboys and cowgirls competed for a piece of the more than $400,000 prize purse and a chance to compete for national titles at the Canadian Finals Rodeo, November 8-12 at Northlands Coliseum. For 138 years, Northlands has taken great pride in showcasing the western way of life. While rodeo comes to the campus for a few days in summer and a week in the fall it is the rich history that drives Northlands to showcase and share with its neighbours and friends. As the inaugural K-Days Rodeo comes to an end the excitement, food, rides, shows and attractions are still in full force on the K-Days grounds until July 30!

Photo Credit: Northlands

 

Photo Credit: Northlands

 

Photo Credit: Northlands

 

Photo Credit: Northlands

101st Teepee Creek Stampede

 

Credit: Nicky Rae Photography

The Teepee Creek Stampede ran this year from July 13-16 in Teepee Creek, Alberta. The rodeo is one of the oldest in Alberta, last year celebrating their centennial, with the first ever TeePee Creek Stampede being held in 1916. For many years the Teepee Creek Stampede was the largest amateur rodeo in the north and one of the largest amateur events in Canada. In 2007, the decision was made to sanction the event as a Canadian Pro Rodeo Association professional rodeo. Teepee Creek Stampede brings some of the very best cowboys and cowgirls in the world to compete in front of massive crowds, in 2015 alone they boasted 15,000 spectators to the event. The committee has also done an excellent job of continuing to embrace the history of the stampede by showcasing local events such as the Wild Cow Milking, Wild Horse Race, and The Rawhide Race, as well as including chuckwagon racing and specialty acts to entertain and thrill the crowds.

This year, the official photographer for the event was Nicky Rae Photography who shared some of her fantastic photos with WHR below. Rae says, “I am honoured to have wrapped up my first year as the official photogpraher of the Teepee Creek Stampede Pro Rodeo. It was a busy 4 days in the wild with mounted shooting, barrel racing, cattle penning, a queen contest, pony (chuckwagons) and World Chuckwagon Association wagons, trick riders, wild horse and pony racers, great concerts and of course the standardly awesome pro rodeo action. Great announces that have rodeo in their soul, and speak it for all of us to hear. I choose carefully the events that I partner with because I pour my heart and soul into every one. When I was asked to photograph this event, I didn’t even need to think about the answer. This event holds so much history it is unbelievable. The best part? The folks that put this event on know how important and rare that is and they cherish it, even feature it. After all, you should do it with passion, or not at all. Congrats to the 2017 committee and competitors for a job well done.”

 

The Teepee Creek Stampede Stagecoach. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography

 

Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography

 

The pony chuckwagons are a fan favourite. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography

 

Future pro rodeo stars, the Little Briches Rodeo contestants. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae photography

 

Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography

 

That’s one way to finish a cold one at the rodeo. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography

 

One of the youngest specialty acts at the Teepee Creek Stampede. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography.

 

Another brave, young, trick rider performs roman riding over fire. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography.

 

Miss Rodeo Canada, Ali Mullin, was in attendance. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography.

 

Mutton Busting is a crowd favourite at the event. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography.

 

Miss Teepee Creek Stampede, Miss Rodeo Canada and the Teepee Creek Stampede Rodeo Committee. Photo Credit: Nicky Rae Photography.

 

 

Texan takes top spot in 14 class Team Cattle Penning Championships

Photo: Calgary Stampede Team Cattle Penning


Shared from Calgary Stampede News

When the prize money at the Calgary Stampede enters record-breaking territory, even riders from Texas will make the trek north, despite having 11 horses in tow.

The journey paid off to the tune of $27,737 for Louie Saggione III of New Boston, Texas. Saggione and his teammates, Erin Hill (Temecula, Calif.) and Gary Naughton (Grand Ridge, Ill.) took top spot in the 14 Class Team Cattle Penning Championships Friday at the Saddledome. A whopping 819 teams entered the event’s four classes, up from 650 in 2016, pushing the overall prize money to $400,032.

“When you put this much money up, you are going to get an exemplary group of competitors,” said Saggione, whose team posted an aggregate time of 132.420 over four runs, with 12 head penned. “We had a little luck and the team worked well together. We stayed calm and did what we needed to.”

Reserve Champions Shaylene Hunter, Carther Rice and Chrissy Santangelo were awarded a cheque for $18,491 for their time of 140.070 with 12 head penned. In Team Cattle Penning, teams have one thin minute to separate three specifically identified cattle from a herd of 30 and direct them into a 16-foot-by-24-foot pen at the opposite end of the arena. It’s a fast-paced dance between the riders and their mounts, and the cattle they’re aiming to pen.

Teamwork is paramount, with all three riders working in harmony to cut out the correct cattle and drive them to the pen. The four classes in Team Cattle Penning are based on relative skill and experience — in ascending order from 7 Class, to 10 Class, to 14 Class, to the trainers and travelling professionals of the Open Class. This year, teams faced off over three days of qualifying in the Silver Slate Arena in Stavely, Alberta, for the 20 available spots in each class.

Saggione, Hill and Naughton have ridden together for years and the Stampede is the kick off to their competition season. Hill qualified for Sunday’s Class 10 final and then the trio will head to California with those 11 horses Saggione drove up from Texas. (Despite the number of mounts, Hill ended up borrowing horses from other competitors for her rides.) First, though, there will be time for some “adult activities” at local watering holes, Saggione said.

A team from closer to home, meanwhile, took the 7 Class Team Cattle Championships, also held on Friday. Father and daughter Leonard and Danielle Gamache from Quesnel, B.C. earned their championship belt buckles and $32,452 payout for their four rides with teammate Christine Gray of Kamloops, B.C. The trio posted an aggregate time of 141.860 with 12 head penned, nailing consistent runs in the 30- to 40-second zone.

That the trio bested a field of 241 teams in the 7 Class is even more impressive when you learn Danielle is 15 years old. It’s not her first rodeo, so to speak, as she competed at Stampede last year (finishing in eighth spot) and won the Nationals in 2014 riding with her parents.

“I like to be competitive,” she said with a shrug when asked what keeps her engaged in the sport. Her father confirmed it, saying his daughter brings that drive for perfection to all that she does, whether it’s her schooling or rounding up cattle in front of thousands of spectators. Danielle will have a shot at another championship buckle on Sunday, as she also qualified in the 10 Class.

“The family that plays together, that pens together, stays together,” added Leonard, and as his son also competes, it really is a family hobby.

Also in 7 Class, an aggregate time of 161.700 with 12 head penned earned Jim Ward and Ty and Lani Cornelius the title of Reserve Champions and a cheque for $21,635.

For full results, please visit calgarystampede.com

About the Calgary Stampede

The Calgary Stampede celebrates the people, the animals, the land, the traditions and the values that make up the unique spirit of the west.  The Calgary Stampede contributes to the quality of life in Calgary and southern Alberta through our world-renowned 10-day Stampede, year-round facilities, western events and several youth and agriculture programs. Exemplifying the theme We’re Greatest Together; we are a volunteer-supported, not-for-profit community organization that preserves and promotes western heritage and values.  All revenue is reinvested into Calgary Stampede programs and facilities.

GMC Rangeland Derby – King Kelly’s Final Lap

The King of the Chuckwagons, Kelly Sutherland is set to take his last laps around the Calgary Stampede track this year. Photo: Leah Hennel/Post Media

 

Re-posted with permission from Calgary Stampede News
By: Scott Cruickshank, Calgary Stampede

The writing on the side of the shiny truck nicely sums up the man’s career. Painted in big letters, white on black, are two lines – 12 world championships, 12 Calgary championships. That snapshot of dominance is digestible even at highway speed. And the licence plate declares who’s in the driver’s seat – KING K. Yes, the King. Kelly Sutherland. The chuckwagon legend, who will soon know if he needs to update that paint job, is taking his last crack at the GMC Rangeland Derby. Because, whether he likes it or not, the pasture awaits. Aging out at 65 years old, does not mean he intends to tiptoe away from the Calgary Stampede. A household name, the winningest reinsman in history, he remains hungry.

“When you talk about racing, I was a hog – I got to the trough,” says Sutherland, relaxing at his son Mark’s spread, south of Calgary. “When I leave, there’s going to be quite a vacuum… because I’m always perceived to be a threat to win. If I can get there, I can usually get the job done.”

Action – with $1.15 million in prize money – opens Friday at 7:45 p.m. It concludes July 17 with the Dash for Cash. One of 36 invitees, Sutherland has appeared 21 times in the championship heat. So he doesn’t see why he can’t pad his portfolio.

“Oh, that would be special,” he says of the prospect of nailing down a 13th title here. “Every win has been extremely emotional, especially the last ones. You know you’re coming to the top of the mountain and you’re putting up more flags. That’s how I look at it – you make your mark higher every time you win. The minute you stop doing that, of course, your career starts going the other way.”

Sutherland admits that, physically, he ain’t what he used to be. Even faithfully following an off-season training regimen hasn’t slowed a case of the creaks. As a relatively small driver, five foot 11 and 175 pounds, he’s taken a beating over the past 50 years. “Shoulders, hips, all moving joints,” says the Grande Prairie, Alta., native. “The last five years have been extremely hard on my body. My body has been telling me for a while that things aren’t so nice.”

“I can walk – everybody knows somebody that can’t – so I think that it’s just time for me.”

The sport won’t see another character like him. Peers and fans love or hate the outspoken star, but no one can dispute his profile, which he took measures to enhance. Accommodating reporters. Signing autographs. Promoting himself. “I was the first chuckwagon driver that actually made posters,” says Sutherland. “It was frowned upon in the ’70s by the old guys. They were very reserved. It was the western way – you didn’t blow your own horn. My whole life has been colourful to say the least.”

Without question. Only 17 years old, and already married to his sweetheart Debbie, he made an erratic debut at the Stampede. At 20, he placed second.

“I thought, ‘Well, there it goes – I’m never going to win this thing.’ ” But in 1974, he became the youngest-ever victor in Calgary – only 22. He claimed four of the next five crowns. “I thought I was invincible, that I could win at will.”

But over the next 19 years, he registered only a single Rangeland victory. Carousing was taking its toll. Desperately reaching out to Alcoholics Anonymous, he’s been sober since 1995. “(Drinking) used to consume about eight hours of my day,” says Sutherland. “(Without booze) you’ve got that eight hours to put to use and I just focused on racing horses and winning. “I got cleaned up and I won (the Stampede) five out of six years.” Along the way to chuckwagon’s pinnacle, he cultivated a couple of trademarks – the eagle feather (tucked into his hat band before his first Stampede triumph and immediately a permanent part of his get-up) and the exuberant post-race thumbs-up.

“That’s emotional,” Sutherland says of the gesture. “When you win something and you beat a bunch of guys … some guys hide emotion, I don’t.” He managed to capture Rangeland Derby titles in his 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s – and one a couple of months shy of his 60th birthday. Imagine that.

“When I was a kid, I always had so much drive to be successful,” he says. “Internally, I felt that I had to conquer some sporting event. Fortunately, I won early and often when I was young. I got the confidence. After that, it was natural.

“At some of the bigger events, like Calgary, (I felt) it’s not mine to win, it’s mine to lose. There was just an air about it. I feel an entitlement that that show is blocked and reserved for me.”

Now Sutherland, a great-grandfather, is done. Nearly. “Kind of surreal,” he says, “because I’ve witnessed the sport come from the real, real rough, tough, old cowboy stance to a lot of commercialization now. I’m sure I’ll miss it, but I think I’m ready to move onto another chapter in my life.”

About the Calgary Stampede

The Calgary Stampede celebrates the people, the animals, the land, the traditions and the values that make up the unique spirit of the west.  The Calgary Stampede contributes to the quality of life in Calgary and southern Alberta through our world-renowned 10-day Stampede, year-round facilities, western events and several youth and agriculture programs. Exemplifying the theme We’re Greatest Together; we are a volunteer-supported, not-for-profit community organization that preserves and promotes western heritage and values.  All revenue is reinvested into Calgary Stampede programs and facilities.