Edmonton’s Premier Western Events Shine

Courtesy of Northlands 

A Final Tip of the Hat to CFR at Northlands. Photo Credit: Canadian Finals Rodeo

EDMONTON, AB (November 12, 2017) – For the past five days, Northlands was honoured to host the 44th annual Canadian Finals Rodeo and Farmfair International from November 8 – 12 at Northlands Coliseum and the Edmonton EXPO Centre. Two of Edmonton’s largest annual events spurred western excitement throughout the Northlands grounds and the entire city of Edmonton, with a combined attendance of 191,397.

 “We are proud of the incredible growth achieved by Farmfair International,” said Tim Reid, President and CEO, Northlands. “The success of this event further demonstrates the importance of agriculture to Northlands and to Alberta’s economy. Farmfair is an integral part of the future of Northlands as we embrace our agricultural roots moving forward.”

The 44rd edition of Farmfair International drew a record 101,129 guests to the Edmonton EXPO Centre to take in cattle shows and sales, equine events, the Heritage Ranch Rodeo, RAM Country Marketplace and more. This a 5.8% increase over last year’s record breaking attendance, and the first time Farmfair International has attracted more than 100,000 guests. Farmfair International brought 140 international buyers from 14 countries together to conduct business, trade industry knowledge and to purchase top-quality genetics from Alberta producers. The number of international buyers is up 55% over last year. With more than 1,500 head of livestock exhibited including more than 1,000 head of purebred cattle, the 2017 edition of Farmfair International was one of the biggest yet.

From humble beginnings in 1974, the first Canadian Finals Rodeo drew 24,000 guests to the Edmonton Gardens. In its 44th and final year at Northlands Coliseum, 90, 268 guests took in six action-packed performances over five days. This is a 3.3% increase over last year’s attendance. As the largest indoor rodeo in Canada, 108 competitors chased the dream for championship buckles and their share of more than $1.5 million in prize money. The Roadhouse presented by TD brought live performances to the Edmonton EXPO Centre on Friday and Saturday including Dallas Smith’s Side Effects Tour presented by Old Camp, as well as Tanya Tucker and Aaron Pritchett to keep the party going after CFR performances.

“Fans of the Canadian Finals Rodeo came out to show their support and demonstrated the impact this event has on our local economy,” said Tim Reid, President and CEO, Northlands. “We thank the CFR fans for their support and loyalty over the last 44 years. This is not goodbye but see you later.”

BeefTech presented by realagriculture

Photo Credit: Jenn Webster

Join Northlands on November 8 and 9 for BeefTech presented by realagriculture — an interactive beef industry learning event. BeefTech is a comprehensive agriculture conference focusing on state-of-the-art practices and technology in the beef industry.

Agriculture experts will share knowledge on a range of topics from the use of drones in ranching to using ultrasound to predict carcass traits. Attendees can take in a choice of nearly 20 sessions of intuitive knowledge and insight.  These sessions are unique in that they’re as informative as they are interactive. Session speakers will put new management practices and technologies directly in attendees’ hands, giving them the opportunity to choose the right technology that will make them – and those involved in the production chain, profitable.

Quadcopter with camera flying over field. Photo Credit: Smart agriculture Concept

Sessions include:

  • Cow-Calf Cost of Production: Calculator Tutorial – Kathy Larson
  • Managing Cattle from Above: Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Precision Ranching – John Church
  • Timed Breeding: How Protocols Work – Don Miller 
  • Lessons in Advocacy: Tips to Help You Speak Up – Andrew Campbell
  • Building A Risk Management Program for Your Cattle Operations – Ryan Copithorne

Photo Credit: Jenn Webster

Featured Keynotes include:
Robert Saik, Agri-Trend – “The Agriculture Manifesto”
Rob will take you on a quick journey showing how farmers are integrating technology to feed a growing world population. He will touch on robotics, artificial intelligence, sensor integration, bio synthesis (GE and GMO), data systems and environment sustainability.

Andrew Campbell, Fresh Air – “Stand Up for Your Industry!”
Explore and experience emerging technologies and innovative management practices. Learn how to implement technology in your beef operation to improve production and increase profitability.

Photo Credit: Jenn Webster

For registration and further details,
visit northlands.com/our-community/agriculture/beeftech.

National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s Cowboy Crossings® Opening Weekend generates nearly $1 million in sales

Submitted by the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association

Intricate spur straps created by craftsman, Chuck Stormes. Photo Credit: TCAA.


OKLAHOMA CITY
 – Cowboy Crossings, one of the nation’s foremost annual Western art sales and exhibitions, is now open to the public at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. During Opening Weekend, Oct. 5 – 7, gross sales exceeded $986,310 with a portion of those proceeds benefiting the Museum’s educational programs.
The event and exhibition offers a unique combination of more than 150 pieces of art represented in different mediums featuring the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA) 52nd Annual Sale & Exhibition as well as the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA) 19th Annual Exhibition & Sale.

“We are pleased by the tremendous support for Western art from across the country,” said Chief Financial Officer and Interim President and CEO Gary Moore. “The combination of working art such as saddles, bits and spurs, and rawhide braiding, along with the fine art of painting and sculpture, helps many individuals connect with the West in ways they might not have previously considered.”

Shot glasses crafted by local artist, Scott Hardy, took home top honours. Photo Credit: TCAA.

Clifton, Texas, CAA artist Martin Grelle’s piece, Expectations, was the show’s highest selling piece at $54,000. The highest selling TCAA piece was a sterling silver shot glass set and tray by artist Scott Hardy of Longview, Alberta, Canada, selling for $31,000.   
The CAA exhibition is available through Nov. 26, 2017, and TCAA will be on display through Jan. 7, 2018. Unsold art is available for purchase through The Museum Store at (405) 478-2250 ext. 228. For more information, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/cowboy-crossings. For award-winning art associated with this release, click here.

A full list of winners from the weekend’s awards show is as follows:

  • The CAA Stetson Award recipient, selected by active CAA members as the best compilation of individual works, was Paul Moore of Norman, Oklahoma, for his six bronze sculptures: Old Man Losing His Heron, When His Heart is Down, Tug of War, Blessing at Wuwuchim, Hopi Two Horned Priest, and Young San Felipe Green Corn Dancer. 
  • The Anne Marion Best of Show Award, chosen by anonymous artist judges from the four gold medal winners, was given to Grant Redden of Evanston, Wyoming, for his painting, Feeding the Flock.
  • Jason Scull of Kerrville, Texas, earned the Ray Swanson Memorial Award for his bronze relief, Waitin’ for Daylight. The award is given for a work of art that best communicates a moment in time, capturing emotion.
  • Grant Redden received the Oil Painting Gold Medal Award for his painting, Feeding the Flock.
  • Martin Grelle of Clifton, Texas, received the Oil Painting Silver Medal Award for his painting, Expectations.
  • Whirling Wind on the Plains, a Texas limestone sculpture by Oreland C. Joe Sr. (Navajo/Ute), of Kirtland, New Mexico, was the Sculpture Gold Medal Award winner.
  • When His Heart is Down, a bronze sculpture by Paul Moore of Norman, Oklahoma, was the Sculpture Silver Medal Award winner.
  • Phil Epp of Newton, Kansas, received the Water Soluble Gold Medal Award for his painting, Hilltop.
  • Mikel Donahue of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, received the Water Soluble Silver Medal Award for his painting, The Bronc Stomper.
  • C. Michael Dudash of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, received the Drawing and Other Media Gold Medal Award for his charcoal and chalk drawing, Cowgirl.
  • Tyler Crow of Hico, Texas, received the Drawing and Other Media Silver Medal Award for his charcoal drawing, Cow Camp Studio.
  • The Buyers’ Choice Award, selected by show attendants, was awarded to Tyler Crow for his charcoal drawing, Cow Camp Studio.

    Artist, Tyler Crow. Made in America, Oil, 32” x 26” Photo Credit: TCAA.

The TCAA’s do not confer awards for their pieces in the Cowboy Crossings exhibition, instead choosing to offer cash scholarships to a select number of up-and-coming traditional artists. This year’s fellowship winners are:

  • TCAA Fellowship for Cowboy Craftsmen recipients are Troy Flayharty and Graeme Quisenberry.
  • Mike Eslick received the Emerging Artist Award.

    Saddle with Tapaderos by craftsman, John Willemsma. Photo Credit: TCAA.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
Nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is located only six miles northeast of downtown Oklahoma City in the Adventure District at the junction of Interstates 44 and 35, the state’s exciting Adventure Road corridor. The Museum offers annual memberships beginning at just $40. For more information, visitnationalcowboymuseum.org. For high-resolution images related to the National Cowboy Museum, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/media-pics/.

Shamrock Performance Horses

Tyler, Helen, Jaden and Rowdey Nowosad of Dewberry, AB.

BY GUEST AUTHOR, JESSI SELTE

Shamrock Performance horses owned and operated by Tyler and Helen Nowosad of Dewberry, Alberta, not only showed this years ABRA 1D champion horse, they also trained the DR Nick Bar Granddaughter, Raise The Gold Bar aka “Alley,” at the 2017 Canadian Barrel Horse Incentive Super Stakes held this past weekend in Ponoka, AB.

 

The dynamic duo of Alley and Helen made lasting impressions right from their first competition together in 2015, bringing home the Bohnet’s Barrel Barn Futurity Buckle. With a very successful 2015 season behind them, Alley needed a break as she suffered a wire cut that took her out of the 2016 racing season. Fully healed and well conditioned the team set their sights high for 2017. Long miles on the road did not deter, placing them at the top all spring and summer. August found them at the Alberta Barrel Racing Association Finals in Ponoka, Alberta. After multiple days and consistent runs they secured the 1D champion spot, and the championship saddle.

 

One of many buckles earned by Helen and Raise The Gold Bar.

Every success has a back-story and Helen and Tyler’s is one of hard work and determined nature. The quiet humble couple, live with their two children Jaden (11) and Rowdey (7), three dogs and numerous other barnyard animals just south of the Chuckwagon Capital of Canada in Dewberry, AB. They bought the ranch in November of 2007 and have since upgraded the property to be safe and functional for their broodmares and young stock.

One of the foals produced by the Nowosad family.

With mutual interest and involvement in College Rodeo and roping, Tyler and Helen found each other. Shortly after College Tyler, a welder by trade, focused his energy on taking care of his young family. Competition wouldn’t stay away long though. The young couple persevered through pedigree to find top performances horses. The first being, a DR Nick Bar mare, the horse that Helen developed her outstanding ability as a barrel racer. After much success with the DR Nick Bar line, and collecting four own daughters by the legendary stallion, this would be the start of their elite bred broodmare band. This includes Alley’s sensational Dam “Sweet Fleet Bar.” The DR Nick Bar horses have proven their athletic ability and superior mindsets time and time again.

The couple knew right from the start how important a solid proven foundation would be. Not only did the mares have to prove themselves, but the foals had to perform as well. That thought process led to the Nowosad’s obtaining their double-bred Peppy San badger stallion BSF Northern Boon, aka “Vegas” (Peptos Quick Pick x El Northern Dance).

This next key purchase, Vegas, started as a smooth moving yearling, who caught Tyler’s eye at an auction sale. Tyler had planned to sit on his hands that day, but couldn’t resist a bid. In 2014 the Nowosad’s started crossing Vegas with their DR Nick Bar daughters, and in no time fell in love with the cross. Vegas now is the primary stallion used at Shamrock Performance Horses.

The young stallion and Tyler shared their own success story this spring, when SR Vegas Got Lucky aka “Marley,” was sold to 2016 World Champion Header Levi Simpson. Marley, the first son of Vegas’, found his niche in team roping instead of barrel racing. This allowed Tyler to campaign his skills as a roper and trainer.

Versatility in the performance world can be a hard to achieve. Combining dominant race blood with outcross working cow horse lines, generates an opportunity for the Nowosad’s to utilize all of their abilities. This is very evident in the horses that they are now performing on. This foundation of strong genetics in pedigree will remain stable for years to come.

Jaden and Rowdey are also an integral part of the system. They expose, and challenge the young horses to adhere to the “younger generations” tasks. Further demonstrating the quality of mind produced through the outcross genetics.

With winter fast approaching the Nowosad’s are gearing up for 2018. Fully dedicated, each and every one of them contributes their time, effort and dollars to insuring the success of the program. Helen is currently taking the steps necessary to get Alley on the track to RFD TV’s American Rodeo Richest One Day Rodeo in the World, hosted in Texas February 2018.

The Canadian Barrel Horse Incentive Breeders Sale October 7, 2017 in Ponoka, Alberta, was a strong start to the new season. Where they had a yearling filly “Sweet Northern Nick” entered with her Super Stakes Certificate and selling as the reserve highest bid. This filly is eligible for the added incentive money if run at the CHBI Thanksgiving race in the future. This was the first available yearling horse to be sold out of the program.

However, that was not the end of the Nowosad’s success at the 2017 Thanksgiving weekend. “Alley” held up her end of the bargain as well. With the fastest times on day 1&2 of the CBHI Derby, Helen and Alley had the long wait of being the last run in the Short Go. Excitement coursed through the arena as the dynamic duo “peeled paint” on three exceptional barrels, not only to win, but also to set an arena record at Calnash Center, with a 16.824 sec run. Hard work pays off but does not start nor end in the arena.

The Nowosad family will be busy introducing their exciting young prospects to the training program. Their training program involves many aspects including gentle starts; to develop balance and minds, extensive exposure to kids, dogs and other animals; with consistent training by all four members. One training tip they take very seriously is giving their horses praise. By developing a strong horse/rider bond through praise, the Nowosad’s are able to establish a willing confident partner.

Helen credits mentor NFR qualifier Lee Ann Rust for elevating her confidence and refining the mechanics of the training program. Rust’s insightful instruction has greatly influenced Helen’s guidance of her daughter Jaden.

Tyler and Helen are very excited for the future of their program. As well as watching Jaden and Rowdey make an impression on the rodeo world. The Shamrock may be a symbol of luck, but it’s the dedication of this exceptional family that brings success to Shamrock Performance Horses.

Western Thanksgiving

If you’re sitting in your house watching the raging blizzard outside your windows, it’s hard to imagine this coming weekend means Thanksgiving, in October – not a blustery day deep into December or January. However, a snow-mageddon presents the perfect opportunity to do some planning. With Thanksgiving on the horizon, it’s the perfect time to give thanks and reflect on our blessings of the past year. And it’s the perfect time to blend the elements of our western lifestyle around us, into a creative and elegant setting for a feast with our loved ones.

After all, I feel as though no one can do Autumn like western folk can – with harvests done, cattle moved into their winter pastures and much of the horse show year now behind us – this is our season!

The ultimate would be to serve Thanksgiving dinner in the barn. But if you’re inclined to stay indoors near the warmth of a hard-working oven, here are six ideas for integrating your western lifestyle into a beautiful Thanksgiving feast.

Source: Country Living.

1. Pendelton Pumpkins. These sassy, geometrically-designed gourds are certain to be all the rage this year. Get yourself some soft pastel paint colors and washi tape and you too, can create beautiful pumpkins that scream western elegance.

Source: Country Living

Credit: Jenn Webster

2. Mason Jars filled with cutlery. Mason jars have been popular for everything from drinking sweet tea, to featuring beautiful motifs in candle displays. This year, we’re using them at each place setting to carefully delegate eating utensils and napkins.

Source: Tone on Tone

3. An Antler & Pumpkin Centerpiece. This stunning, yet simplistic centerpiece is created with white candles, flowers and antler sheds. Set on top of a white-washed farm table, you can’t go wrong with the artistic western balance of it all.

Credit: Jenn Webster

4. Charcuterie Board. A no-cook way to get the party started. Served on a round wooden slab, a selection of meats, pickled beans, cheeses, grapes and shell-shucked dry roasted almonds can stimulate appetites, while allowing the host a few more minutes for dinner preparation. The addition of a harvest-inspired centerpiece will give your table an elegant western flare.

Credit: Tone on Tone

 

5. Decorate Your Barn with Pumpkins. Who says all the Thanksgiving decor has to be up at the house? Or conversely, bring a barn sign up to your house, to compliment all the fall accents.

Credit: Pinterest

6. Beautifully Set Table. A stunning tablescape will set the tone for your dinner. A table left with a little space for food is good, but a filled table can be gorgeous. Use natural foliage for table accents or napkin holders. Use rustic-looking charger plates and chic glassware to instill an exclusive element.

Meet CS Princess Lizzie

Princess Lizzie addressing the Grandstand during the Calgary Stampede 2017.

The Calgary Stampede Royalty competition is in full swing for the next royal trio. Western Horse Review sat down with Lizzie Ryman, one of this years Calgary Stampede Princesses, about her experience, her fondest memories, and her sweet “Prince”, Kansas.

1. What have been some of your most memorable experiences, since your reign as Princess began, to date?

I would have to say that my most memorable experiences as a Princess thus far have happened right here at home in Calgary! Although we have been fortunate enough to travel to place such as Las Vegas and Berlin, you definitely don’t have to travel far to find something special. We attend “Happy Trails” once a month, where we visit seniors homes and bring the Calgary Stampede to those who live there. I met an elderly man who was a member of the Calgary Police Service for 45 years. Not only did we get to sit and chat about everything CPS – he also gave me some fantastic advice about how to apply for the police force, something I am very interested in doing in the future. Following this, he asked me to dance. Soon after he told me that his wife had passed 5 years ago, and I was the first person he had danced with since. He was so grateful for the time that I had spent with him at that particular evening’s Happy Trails, and I genuinely did not want to leave when the time came. The most important moments throughout your year as Royalty happen in the most unexpected ways, and I will never forget that evening!

The 2017 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio

2. Can you please tell us about your experience applying to become part of the trio? How did you feel the night you became a princess?

The contest portion for the Calgary Stampede Royalty was actually one of my favourite parts of the year! Throughout the month long competition, I met so many amazing girls that not only had the same interests as me, but helped me along my journey in being crowned as one of the 2017 Calgary Stampede Princesses. The contest entails many events such as public speaking, panel interviews, mix and mingle events, as well as an equestrian portion. Crowning night was one of the most thrilling yet nerve-racking nights of my life, and definitely an experience that I will never forget! I remember driving home after being crowned, walking into the house full of my friends and family – all wearing plastic tiaras with cake to celebrate! I had never felt so much love, support and encouragement.

A younger Lizzie with her beloved grandfather.


3. How has this experience changed your life?

I never could have imagined a more amazing year. Since being crowned one of the 2017 Calgary Stampede Princesses, I have travelled, met some of the most interesting people and made life long friends along the way. Forever will my Stampede family surround me, and although I pass on my crown very shortly, I have so many memories and skills that I have gained throughout this year to take along with me.

 

Lizzie, and her Prince, Kansas.


4. Can you please tell us about your Royal horse?

My Royal horse is named Kansas! He is the sweetest boy and I feel so lucky to ride him throughout the year of my reign. Kansas and Snoopy both came from John Scott as a duo to the Royalty program 7 years ago, and were actually used as stunt doubles for one another in the movie production industry!

Lizzie with one of her horses, Juno.

5. Can you please tell us about some of your best beauty tips/secrets? 

Get as much sleep as possible! Drink plenty of water and take your vitamins. These are the real secrets to feeling fresh and ready for the day!

6. Any favourite outfits?

I would have to say that my favourite outfit would be what we call our “Blue Leathers” made by Janine’s Custom Creations. Simple, yet noticeable and elegant!

Lizzie, running the Canadian Flag, as one of the CS Ranch Girls.

Premiere Western Art Show at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum will host Cowboy Crossings, one of North America’s foremost annual Western art sales and exhibitions, opening to the public this October 7, 2017 in Oklahoma City, OK. The event and exhibition offers a unique combination of more than 150 pieces of art represented in different mediums featuring the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA) 52nd Annual Sale & Exhibition, as well as the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA) 19th Annual Exhibition & Sale.

Reaching for the Bronc Rein, Oil, 45” x 46”, by Jason Rich.

“The quality and diversity of perspectives showcased in Cowboy Crossings is indicative of how vast and relevant the West is to everyone today,” said Chief Financial Officer and Interim President and CEO Gary Moore. “Western art is at the foundation of the National Cowboy Museum’s mission, and the combination of art styles represented in this show, such as saddles and spurs along with paintings and sculptures, enables everyone to identify with a part of the West.”

Lakota Daydreams, Oil, 34 x 34”, by R.S. Riddick.

The CAA’s mission is to authentically preserve and perpetuate the culture of Western life in fine art. Representing some of the most highly regarded cowboy artists of today, the CAA’s goals include ensuring authentic representations of the West, “as it was and is,” and maintaining standards of quality in contemporary Western art and helping guide collectors.

TCAA Santa Susanna Bit, by Wilson-Capron.

The TCAA is dedicated to preserving and promoting the skills of saddlemaking, bit and spur making, silversmithing, and rawhide braiding and the role of these traditional crafts in the cowboy culture of the North American West. With a focus on education, this organization aims to help the public understand and appreciate the level of quality available today and the value of fine craftsmanship.

Hilltop, Acrylic, 60” x 60”, by Phil Epp.

CAA will be on display through Nov. 26, 2017, and TCAA will be on display through Jan. 7, 2018. For more information, a full list of Opening Weekend activities, or to purchase tickets, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/cowboy-crossings or call (405) 478-2250 ext. 218.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum – Nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is located only six miles northeast of downtown Oklahoma City in the Adventure District at the junction of Interstates 44 and 35, the state’s exciting Adventure Road corridor. For more information, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org.

Sept/Oct WHR available now!

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

As if the invigorating editorial and photo journalism of the September/October issue of Western Horse Review weren’t enough, there are so many behind-the-scenes aspects that we thought we should let you in on the action!

 

In one of our competitor interviews, Louisa Murch White had the chance to speak with Kirsty White, the Canadian professional barrel racer on a consistent hot streak in 2017 with no plans of slowing down. White tells us about her go-round win at Calgary, her main mounts and a little bit about what it’s like to live a day in her life.

Then we featured Donna Wilson of the rural community around Chain Lakes, AB, and  a fourth-generation rancher who passion and main discipline is bronze artistry. Wilson says, “There is such rich imagery in the life we lead here!”

Wilson’s Anchor Bar Bronze is situated in a gallery she shares with good friend and photographer, Debra Garside in Longview, AB. From her trademark works utilizing the intricate use of antlers within a bronze, to her Longhorn cattle pieces, to the artworks that display horses and the western lifestyle, you can read about them all in our Sept/Oct issue.

Carman Pozzobon. Photo by Covy Moore.

In our Fall Run health profile, we spoke with several top professionals in our industry and asked them how they keep their mounts in top condition, during peak fall competitions. Barrel trainer Carman Pozzobon (Kamloops, BC) told us about her Equifit Nerostim Massager, while trainers Dale Clearwater (Hanley, SK) and Dustin Gonnet (Cayley, AB) open up about their feed programs and the importance of versatility in training. Reining specialist Locke Duce of High River, AB, mentions the benefits of Pulse Therapy in his daily regime. Learn their top tips and more in our in-depth piece for the final gauntlet of the show season.

Savanna Sparvier, 2017 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

On pages 42-49, we showcase the best in autumn western fashion. Shot by the talented Callaghan Creative Co., this special photojournalism piece took us from the Calgary Polo Club, to the backyard our own Sally Bishop’s in Nanton, AB, to the runways of the Vulcan Airport. We were so lucky to be joined by a group of beautiful models and authentic horse women, for this amazing feature. On the cover and in the picture above, you’ll find the stunning Savanna Sparvier, the 2017 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess.

Did we mention – we had the turquoise, coyote fur jacket (with Pendleton®️blankets) by Janine’s Custom Creations, custom-made for this issue of the magazine?

If readers could have been with us on that day they would have seen a huge crew of talented people, hustling at every location to get the models in make-up, hair and dressed for an optimal moment in front of the camera.

Stay tuned for an upcoming blog solely about on our behind-the-scenes action from the Fall Shoot!

A solar waterer. Photo by Esteban Adrogue.

In our How-To feature, we tell you about an innovative solar waterer created by Rob Palmer of Nanton, AB, that got his ranch off the grid. Even in the brunt of a cold winter, Palmer can rely on solar power to water his cows and keep his monthly service provider bills to a bare minimum.

Paul Brandt has taken his success as a musician and used it as a launching pad for many incredible philanthropic purposes.

 

We also had the chance to interview the iconic Paul Brandt in the Sept/Oct issue, the most awarded male Canadian country music artist in history. In this compelling editorial, Louisa Murch White got the chance to speak with Brandt about music, his philanthropic work and his most recent #NotInMyCity campaign.

Launched just prior to the 2017 Calgary Stampede. the #NotInMyCity campaign raises awareness about human trafficking in Calgary, AB. A tough subject to talk about and an even tougher one to fight – but Brandt feels strongly that with awareness and recognition of the serious problem in our own backyard, the public can stand together against it.

Brandt partnered together with local designer Paul Hardy to design scarves and bandannas to help raise funds for the campaign. Hardy says of his design, “…Visually, I hoped to create a motif throughout the bandana and scarf that would not only be bold from afar, but also suggest a community of friendship and a worthiness of trust for those who wear it to stand in solidarity with victims against human trafficking.”

We had the opportunity to photograph these beautiful scarves in our fall fashion shoot. Blowing in the wind, the image suggests freedom. It’s a campaign Western Horse Review supports wholeheartedly.

The #NotInMyCity scarf. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

The September/October issue of Western Horse Review is available now but with more inciteful editorial on the horizon, you don’t want to miss an issue! Get your subscriptions up to date at: http://www.westernhorsereview.com/magazine-subscription/

2017 Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show Limited Age Event

OBR High Cuttin Cat & Glen Beveridge. Photo by Barb Glazer.

SUBMITTED BY ELAINE GOOD

The annual Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show was held August 3 to 6, 2017. Organized by the Saskatchewan Cutting Horse Association (SCHA), the first days featured the Limited Age Event presented by Barry & Elaine Good. These are the classes for cutting horses just beginning their careers and attract particular attention as it’s first time the three-year-olds will have ever been shown. This competition has become an important part of the program for many trainers and breeders as they develop these young horses for the major futurity shows later this fall. It also provides the spectators an inside view at what’s coming from breeding and training programs. Thanks to The Moose Jaw Exhibition Company for their facilities and the great footing in the Golden Mile Arena that really allows the horses to show at their best.

OBR High Cuttin Cat was very consistent for trainer and showman, Glen Beveridge of Valleyview, Alberta, scoring 73s in both go -rounds to claim the three-year-old Open Futurity Aggregate sponsored by Tinman Welding and Maintenance Limited. This sorrel mare sired by Third Cutting and out of the mare Kit Kat, and was raised by owner by Neil Lamoureaux of Drayton Valley, Alberta. Glen says, “She’s really smart on a cow and he’s really looking forward to making the full fall futurity run with her!”

Wild Lil Moonshine & Gale Aykroyd. Photo by Barb Glazer.

The three-year-old Non-Pro Futurity Aggregate winner was Wild Lil Moonshine, a sorrel mare sired by Cats Moonshine and out of the mare JB Wild Wahine. Grant and Gale Aykroyd, Wainwright, Alberta purchased this fluid moving mare from Amanda Digness then Gale took the reins to train and show. Gale describes Wild Lil Moonshine as a fun mare to ride. She really likes coming to the Moose Jaw show. “It’s a good place to give young horses exposure as the experience seems to help them grow up.”

Hot Metal Smarts & Glen Beveridge. Photo by Barb Glazer.

The Four-Year-Old Open Derby Aggregate three-way tie was broken by virtue of the high score of 73 by Hot Metal Smarts, bred by Sherman Minnie and now owned by Hollingworth Farms, Valleyview, Alberta. Trained and shown by Glen Beveridge this red roan mare by Metallic Cat and out of the mare Preppy Jay Bar saw limited showing as a three-year-old, is continuing her show career and eventually will become a part of the broodmare band.

Mouse Ichi & Rocky Davis. Photo by Barb Glazer.

The Four-Year-Old Non Pro Derby Aggregate also had a three-way tie broken by the high score. Mouse Ichi was purchased by Rocky and Heather Davis, Valleyview, Alberta as a three-year-old to replace a futurity prospect that had died. She was shown in the Fort Worth Futurity with moderate success but won Arbuckle this spring. Rider, Rocky Davis sums up this bay mare sired by Cat Ichi, out of the mare Leonilas Choice with, “Ya gotta love her cowyness and try!”

 

Monster Cat & Glen Beveridge. Photo by Barb Glazer.

 

The 5/6 Year Old Open Classic Aggregate went to Monster Cat, a six-year-old sorrel gelding sired by High Brow Cat and out of the mare Miss Rey Hickory. This was another entry from Rocky and Heather Davis and shown by Glen Beveridge. Monster Cat has been shown in numerous limited age events, consistently making the finals. He was just brought back from Texas in time to be shown at Moose Jaw, followed by the fall run of aged events in Canada. Rocky says, “Monster Cat has never grown up, he thinks he’s a kid – very playful!”

 

Monster Cat & Rocky Davis. Photo by Barb Glazer.

Monster Cat came back with Rocky Davis riding to tie for the Non-Pro Classic Aggregate with his half brother Cats Lil Peptolena, who is also owned by Heather and Rocky Davis and shown by Rocky. Cats Lil Peptolena is a gelding also sired by High Brow Cat but out of the mare Peptolena Lucinda.

 

Reys Your Freckles & Les Jack. Photo by Barb Glazer.

The 7 Up Non Pro Aggregate went to Reys Your Freckles owned by Les and Coreen Jack, Rocanville, Saskatchewan and shown by Les. This seven-year-old sorrel mare sired by Dual Rey was the first foal out of their mare, Bet On Freckles. Les started this mare then sent her to Tatum Rice in September of her three-year-old year in preparation for the Forth Worth Futurity where she placed fourth in the Limited Non Pro. “She’s been privilege to own,” says Les. He is looking forward to the two yearlings he has raised out of her, sired by Once In A Blue Boon.

Full results for the Limited Age Event and Weekend Shows are available on-line on the SCHA Website: www.scha.ca.