• Remembering our Aboriginal Veterans

      BY DEBBIE MACRAE While not officially recognized by the Federal Government as National Aboriginal Veterans Day, November 8th, was inaugurated in Winnipeg in 1994 to recognize the efforts of our Indigenous Veterans and aboriginal participants. Even before the War of 1812, territorial expansion was being guarded and defended against invasion by encroaching military and political… [Continue Reading]

      Remembering our Aboriginal Veterans
    • Classic Pork Chops

      By Chef Mike Edgar, Photos by Twisted Tree Photography Now that meal prep is top of mind for many, here’s a pork dish that is easy to make and features a delicious cranberry touch. Thick and juicy oven-baked pork loin chops, smothered in a savoury, brandy reduction and topped with a cranberry-mustard are a wonderful… [Continue Reading]

      Classic Pork Chops
    • Ansel, Our Photoshoot Dog

      BY JENN WEBSTER Just in case you’re not on our subscriber list, we thought we should bring you all up to speed on our latest photoshoot, appearing in the Jan/Feb issue of Western Horse Review. Through this publication, I truly believe we are changing the world in a perhaps small, but significant manner. Even via… [Continue Reading]

      Ansel, Our Photoshoot Dog
    • Ringing in 2020

      BY JENN WEBSTER & ALL PHOTOS BY Twisted Tree Photography. Make-up by Ivonne Arsenault of One Beauty, Calgary, ABHair by Michelle Walsh of One Beauty, Calgary, AB How are you ringing in the New Year? We’re skipping the resolutions and the big bash parties this time – instead choosing to spend the evening with friends… [Continue Reading]

      Ringing in 2020
    • Horses with Heart – Sergeant Reckless

      BY DEBBIE MACRAE She was truly a gift of love – her life exchanged for a limb. His sister had stepped on a land mine and $250 meant that Kim Huk Moon could buy her a leg prosthesis. It was the Korean war. But to do so, he had to let his filly go… He… [Continue Reading]

      Horses with Heart – Sergeant Reckless
    • Cowgirl Room Revamp

      Check out this beautiful revamp of a little cowgirl’s bedroom. We are so in love with this room makeover, that is nearly finished! This special cowgirl wanted a farm/ranch/cowgirl theme. Her grandfather assisted in bringing her mother’s vision for her bed come to life. Underneath, the shelves can house books, toys or Breyer horses. In… [Continue Reading]

      Cowgirl Room Revamp
    • Your Winter Home in AZ

      Are you thinking of venturing to Arizona this winter? With blizzards already in full force here in southern Alberta, Siggins Horse Company, located in Eloy, Arizona, is a full service equine facility offering full care board services, team roping practices and jackpots, and much more. Horse training, lessons and horse sales are also part of… [Continue Reading]

      Your Winter Home in AZ
    • Doc West on Rural Crime

      In light of the southern Alberta story of Edouard Maurice who recently filed a counterclaim against the convicted criminal who drove onto the Maurice property south of Okotoks, AB, on Feb. 24, 2018 and rummaged through his vehicles, we thought it might be prudent to run an archive from our Doc West March/April 2017 column.… [Continue Reading]

      Doc West on Rural Crime

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Remembering our Aboriginal Veterans

The lapel pin commissioned by the Royal Canadian Legion
to commemorate Aboriginal Veterans
.

BY DEBBIE MACRAE

While not officially recognized by the Federal Government as National Aboriginal Veterans Day, November 8th, was inaugurated in Winnipeg in 1994 to recognize the efforts of our Indigenous Veterans and aboriginal participants.

Even before the War of 1812, territorial expansion was being guarded and defended against invasion by encroaching military and political interests. As British territories became vulnerable to attack, thousands of First Nations and Metis warriors were mustered to defend their borders during the War of 1812. More than 10,000 First Nations fighters participated in virtually every battle from the Great Lakes region and the St. Lawrence Valley.

Not only were they physically honed with stealth, patience and marksmanship, they brought a different element of communication not privy to the enemy.

During the Great War, 1914 – 1918, the interest from indigenous participants continued; requiring that volunteers travel extensive distances, learn new languages, and adapt dramatically to cultural differences, previously unfamiliar.

Hunters became snipers and reconnaissance scouts. In World War II they took on a new role; that of Code talkers, converting sensitive radio messages into languages like Cree, an Algonquin homeland dialect thought to be approximately 2,500 to 3,000-years-old from the great lakes region. Other interpreters would convert the messages back, preventing interception by the enemy.

It is believed that by the end of the conflict in 1945, over 3,000 First Nations members had served in uniform. However, the numbers were understated as unknown numbers of Metis, Inuit, and other Indigenous recruits continued to enroll in the Royal Canadian Navy, and Royal Canadian Air Force, as well as the Canadian Army. It is estimated that as many as 12,000 Indigenous people served to defend Canada’s interests during the 20th century.

Their efforts did not stop there. Large amounts of food, money, clothing and supplies were donated on the home front including the use of portions of their reserve lands for defense installations, rifle ranges and the construction of airport facilities.

Many returned to service in 1950 during the Korean War, after having seen action in World War II – and many more did not come home.

Their service continues – from NATO service in Europe to performing international peace support operations worldwide. Service in Afghanistan and even in Canada in remote locations along our east and west coasts, finds our Indigenous military personnel maintaining a vigilant presence to serve and protect in both local and international operations. In recognition of the contributions of all Aboriginal Canadians in war and peacekeeping operations, having served, or contributed on the home front, “To Aboriginal War Veterans in Canada and to those that have Fallen…”, the National Aboriginal Veterans Monument was erected in Confederation Park on the east side of Elgin Street between Laurier Avenue West and Slater Street, in Ottawa, Ontario.

The work is that of artist Lloyd Pinay, and depicts a large bronze eagle on the top, with four men and women from different Indigenous groups across Canada, beneath. The four “spiritual guides” understood to be critical to military success are the powerful wolf, bear, bison, and caribou, defending each corner.

The monument was unveiled on National Aboriginal Day, June 21, 2001 by Her Excellency the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, C.C., C.M.M., C. D. former Governor General of Canada and Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Forces.

In 2005, the Government of Canada participated in a sacred Calling Home Ceremony with Indigenous Spiritual Elders, Veterans and their families in an Aboriginal Spiritual Journey. This special ceremony was intended to invite the spirits of the war dead, and those who served in the World Wars, to return home to their families in their ancestral homelands.

A cultural illustration was created for the event, symbolizing each of the three main participating Indigenous groups:

First Nations People were signified by the Eagle’s Feather, held in the highest regard as the messenger of the Creator. The feather is the link between Creator and the People.

The Inuit symbol was that of the Inuksuk; traditional markers constructed for direction, sighting windows, hunting caches, or fishing locations, as well as another “virtual” being for hunting or companionship.

The colourful Metis Sash originated amongst the voyageurs. Its diverse functionality varied from emergency sewing kits for hunts, bathing cloths and towels, saddle blankets and emergency ropes or halters. Many of the voyageurs had mixed heritages, and the sash became an integral symbol of Metis culture in the West.

In appreciation of their contribution, the Royal Canadian Legion commemorated the Aboriginal Veterans with a lapel pin depicting those symbols. Centered on a dreamcatcher, (originally an Ojibwe symbol of protection), is the Legion Poppy encircled by the Metis sash. Suspended on either side of the Inuit Inuksuk are two Eagle feathers, symbolic of the First Nations people. Unique and beautiful in design, the pin is truly a symbol of unity and honour.

On November 8th, we honour those First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people who have long-served the proud tradition of military service and peace keeping for our country. We thank you.

We acknowledge Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Veterans Affairs Canada, Artist Noel Lloyd Pinay, and Fred Gaffen, without whose contributions this article would not be possible.

Classic Pork Chops

By Chef Mike Edgar, Photos by Twisted Tree Photography

Now that meal prep is top of mind for many, here’s a pork dish that is easy to make and features a delicious cranberry touch. Thick and juicy oven-baked pork loin chops, smothered in a savoury, brandy reduction and topped with a cranberry-mustard are a wonderful way to enjoy a sit-down meal with your family.

BRINE

2 Cups Water
1/2 Cup of Salt
1/2 Cup Sugar
6 Cloves of Garlic
2 Tbsp. of Whole Black Peppercorn
Handful of Fresh Thyme
2 Cups of Ice Cubes

BRINE METHOD
Dissolve the salt and sugar in water. Add aromatics. Bring to a boil and pour over ice cubes. Stir until melted.
 

PORK CHOPS METHOD
Sear your pork chops to start. Place two double cut pork chops, (bone in) into the brine for a minimum of eight hours. Remove from brine and dry. Preheat your oven to 425℉. Sear pork chops in a cast iron pan, for approximately five minutes a side. Place in oven, flipping every three minutes until you have an internal temp of 145℉. Bring out and rest for a minimum of five minutes.
 
SPICED SQUASH PUREE

1 Butternut Squash, Diced (Uncooked)
2 Tbsp. of Butter
1 Tbsp. of Olive Oil
1 Tsp. of Allspice
1 Tsp. Turmeric Powder
1 Tsp. of Ground Ginger
1 Tsp. of Salt 
1 Tsp. Pepper
1/4 Cup of 33% Whipping Cream
1/4 Cup of Water

SPICED SQUASH PUREE METHOD
Roast squash and spices in a preheated 425℉ oven for 25 minutes, until soft. Place in a blender with water and cream and puree.


CIPOILLINI ONIONS
1 Onion per person, Peeled
 
CIPOILLINI ONIONS METHOD
Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper. Pre-heat oven to 425℉. Roast onions seven minutes per side.
 

When arranging your pork chop plate, the asparagus & goat cheese strudel pairs well with the spiced squash puree.


ASPARAGUS & GOAT CHEESE STRUDEL

12 Asparagus Stalks
1/2 Cup Goat Cheese
3 Sheets of Phyllo Pastry
1 Tsp. of Salt
1 Tsp. of Pepper
1/2 Cup of Melted Butter
 
STRUDEL METHOD
Lay one sheet of phyllo pastry down on the cutting board, and brush with butter, repeat two times. Cut the phyllo into four rectangles. Season with salt and pepper and place three asparagus on each rectangle and then crumble equal portions of goat cheese on top. Roll phyllo around the asparagus and goat cheese. Roll to wrap them towards the centre of the spear. Preheat oven to 425℉. Place each pastry on a greased baking sheet and place in oven for six minutes a side.
 

This sweet and savoury brandy reduction is the perfect addition to pork chops.

BRANDY REDUCTION 

2 Cups Chicken Stock
2 Cups Brandy
1 Cup Honey
1 Tbsp. of Tomato Paste
Handful of Fresh Thyme

BRANDY REDUCTION METHOD
Place all ingredients in a pot and bring items to a boil. Boil until the consistency is that of a syrup.
 
CRANBERRY MUSTARD

1/2 Cup Yellow Mustard Seeds
1/4 Cup Brown Mustard Seeds
1 and 1/4 Cup Apple Cider Vinegar
1/2 Cup Maple Syrup
1 Cup Dry Cranberries

CRANBERRY MUSTARD METHOD
Cranberry Sauce:
Soak cranberries in water for two hours. Strain the water off. Puree in a food processor with half the maple syrup.

Mustard:
Place all mustard seeds and vinegar in a jar. Seal the lid. Shake well. Let sit in a dark place for 48 hours.

After 48 Hours
Remove half the mustard seeds and puree in food processor with the cranberry sauce and the remaining maple syrup.
Mix with the remaining mustard seeds. Serve with your pork chops. 

Ansel, Our Photoshoot Dog

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

BY JENN WEBSTER

Just in case you’re not on our subscriber list, we thought we should bring you all up to speed on our latest photoshoot, appearing in the Jan/Feb issue of Western Horse Review. Through this publication, I truly believe we are changing the world in a perhaps small, but significant manner. Even via western fashion photoshoots.

One of the ways we are doing that this issue, is by bringing your attention to the Heaven Can Wait Animal Rescue Foundation out of High River, AB. WHR readers have probably noticed, fashion photoshoots have become an important part of our editorial over the last few years. This issue was no exception. The only difference this time was that we included “Ansel,” the Siberian Husky and Alaskan Malamute-mix, seen in the spread you can find starting on page 46. (Trust me, you’re gonna want to renew your subscription if you haven’t already: www.westernhorsereview.com).

A sneak peek of the Jan/Feb 2020 Photoshoot, featuing “Ansel” and “Pickles” the pony. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

With a western winter and skijor theme, Ansel fit right in. He even made friends with “Pickles,” the pony belonging to my kids who casually walked inside the mansion we used for our shoot location, like she had done it a million times before. (Gotta love good-minded animals!)

Now here’s the real story. Ansel is the survivor of an atrocious hoarding situation that occurred in Milk River, AB, five years ago. He was one of 201 dogs seized by the Alberta SPCA from a property occupied by April Dawn Irving, 59. Animals found there were malnourished and dehydrated, with parasites and filthy, matted fur. Some had broken bones and gaping wounds. Five dead dogs were also found on the property.

Heaven Can Wait provided emergency care for Ansel and three other huskies, as well as three Komondors and an Irish Wolfhound. All eight were brought to health – treated for parasites, vaccinated, spayed and neutered, groomed, and fed with supplements for weight gain and coat health. After being worked with and having their personalities assessed, they were adopted into loving homes.

Ansel is now thriving and was a pleasant addition to our photoshoot. Aged six, he lives with a Calgary, AB couple and a Siberian husky companion. He is affectionate and healthy, and loves his home comforts and outdoor adventures.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

Heaven Can Wait is a no-kill shelter and serves a wide area of rural communities in southern Alberta including farms, ranches and acreages. It has approximately 40 dogs and 150 cats in its care. Many are available for adoption, although some are considered sanctuary animals due to health or behavioural issues. The rescue has an ongoing need for donations – its biggest expense is veterinary care. For information on how to help and details of adoptable animals, visit www.heavencanwait.ca or follow their Facebook page.

We learned in December 2019 that sentencing in the Milk River case was delivered at Lethbridge Provincial Court. Irving was banned for life from owning animals in Alberta after pleading guilty to four counts of causing an animal to be in distress. Although issued $15,000 in fines, she did not have to pay due to time served in custody.

Ringing in 2020

BY JENN WEBSTER & ALL PHOTOS BY Twisted Tree Photography. Make-up by Ivonne Arsenault of One Beauty, Calgary, ABHair by Michelle Walsh of One Beauty, Calgary, AB How are you ringing in the New Year? We’re skipping the resolutions and the big bash parties this time – instead choosing to spend the evening with friends […]

[Continue reading…]

Horses with Heart – Sergeant Reckless

BY DEBBIE MACRAE She was truly a gift of love – her life exchanged for a limb. His sister had stepped on a land mine and $250 meant that Kim Huk Moon could buy her a leg prosthesis. It was the Korean war. But to do so, he had to let his filly go… He […]

[Continue reading…]

Cowgirl Room Revamp

Check out this beautiful revamp of a little cowgirl’s bedroom. We are so in love with this room makeover, that is nearly finished! This special cowgirl wanted a farm/ranch/cowgirl theme. Her grandfather assisted in bringing her mother’s vision for her bed come to life. Underneath, the shelves can house books, toys or Breyer horses. In […]

[Continue reading…]

Your Winter Home in AZ

Are you thinking of venturing to Arizona this winter? With blizzards already in full force here in southern Alberta, Siggins Horse Company, located in Eloy, Arizona, is a full service equine facility offering full care board services, team roping practices and jackpots, and much more. Horse training, lessons and horse sales are also part of […]

[Continue reading…]

Doc West on Rural Crime

In light of the southern Alberta story of Edouard Maurice who recently filed a counterclaim against the convicted criminal who drove onto the Maurice property south of Okotoks, AB, on Feb. 24, 2018 and rummaged through his vehicles, we thought it might be prudent to run an archive from our Doc West March/April 2017 column. […]

[Continue reading…]

Ranch Country Horse Sale 2019

The 15th Annual Ranch Country Horse Sale Inc. (RCH Sale) was held at the Maple Creek, SK, Agricultural Grounds, on Saturday, Sept 14th, 2019. The Ranch Country Horse Sale members include the Perrins, the Parsonages, and the Bertrams. The High Selling Saddle Horse was Lot #47, MM Docs Cowboy, a 2015 buckskin gelding consigned by […]

[Continue reading…]