• Holiday Side Dishes

      If you saw our recent Western Foodie post about the Holiday Beef Wellington, these are the perfect side dishes to go with. And if the Beef Wellingon doesn’t steal the show, these side dishes definitely will! By MIKE EDGAR, Photos by TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY ROASTED GARLIC MASHED POTATOES Ingredients: 1 Bulb Garlic, Intact Olive Oil… [Continue Reading]

      Holiday Side Dishes
    • Working Against Time

      An equine vet takes us through the diagnosis and treatment of a horse with a metal sliver in its tongue. BY PIPER WHELAN Recognizing the signs of a horse with metal embedded in its tongue can be the difference between life and death. Acting quickly in this situation is vital to ruling out other ailments… [Continue Reading]

      Working Against Time
    • Gifts for Him

      A wonderful collection of gift ideas for him!! For under the tree, under the saddle, in the barn or in his belly. All are amazing presents from local vendors. OUTDOOR COVERThis Powder River Outfitters collection fleece bonded softshell jacket from Panhandle features a full zipper front, interior wind flap, adjustable cuffs and is water and… [Continue Reading]

      Gifts for Him
    • Holiday Beef Wellington

      A twist on a classic. This crowd-pleasing beef wellington is a perfect centrepiece for your next Christmas dinner. By MIKE EDGAR, Photos by TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY BEEF WELLINGTON Ingredients:1.5 Kg Beef Fillet2 Tsp. Vegetable or Sunflower Oil2 x 50g Pack Dried Porcini Mushrooms25g butter, plus extra for the sauce500g (1 lb. 2oz) Shitake Mushrooms, Finely… [Continue Reading]

      Holiday Beef Wellington
    • CHIEF CROWFOOT – SOLDIER OF PEACE

      Born in 1830 near the Belly River in southern Alberta, his infant name was Shot Close. His parents, Istowun-eh’pata (Packs a Knife) and Axkahp-say-pi (Attacked Towards Home) were Kainai or Blood, of the Blackfoot Confederacy, which also included the Blackfoot and Piegan peoples. If their names were any indication, the times were troubled and warring… [Continue Reading]

      CHIEF CROWFOOT – SOLDIER OF PEACE
    • Western-Styled Gift Guide

      Our gift for you is this wonderful collection of gift ideas! As always, we are all for spreading some local cheer with amazing gifts for you and yours. By MONIQUE NOBLE PUT A RING IN ITWhat’s a gift without a box to put it in? For a little extra western flair this holiday season, wrap… [Continue Reading]

      Western-Styled Gift Guide
    • John McCrae & Bonfire

      Dr. John McCrae is most famously known for penning one of history’s most evocative war poems, In Flanders Fields. He served first, in Africa, where he was appalled by the inadequate treatment of wounded soldiers on the battlefield, so much so, that he resigned and severed his military relationships for many years. During WW1, when… [Continue Reading]

      John McCrae & Bonfire
    • 2021 Ranch Country Horse Sale

      The 16th annual Production & Broke Saddle Horse Sale held September 11, 2021 at the Rodeo Grounds of Maple Creek, SK, was another resounding success! This year the event was run by the Jack Auction Group and it once again featured weanlings, yearlings and broke horses. 2021 SALES RESULTS: Foal Average $1,965.00Yearling Average $2,530.00Top 10… [Continue Reading]

      2021 Ranch Country Horse Sale

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Holiday Side Dishes

If you saw our recent Western Foodie post about the Holiday Beef Wellington, these are the perfect side dishes to go with. And if the Beef Wellingon doesn’t steal the show, these side dishes definitely will!

By MIKE EDGAR, Photos by TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

ROASTED GARLIC MASHED POTATOES

Ingredients:

  • 1 Bulb Garlic,
  • Intact Olive Oil
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 6 Large Russett Potatoes, Peeled and Cut into 1-inch Chunks
  • 4 Tbsp. Unsalted Butter, at Room Temperature
  • 1 Tsp. Salt, Plus More as Needed
  • 1 Cup Milk, Plus More as Needed
  • Minced Chives, for Garnish (Optional)

Method:
Preheat the oven to 375˚ F. Use a sharp knife to slice off the top end so that the bulb remains intact and all of the cloves are exposed. Place on a piece of aluminum foil. Drizzle lightly with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Fold the foil around the bulb so that it is completely covered and bake until the cloves are tender, about 40 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool at least 10 minutes before handling. When cool enough to handle, squeeze the bulb so that the softened cloves fall out. Discard the peels. Use the tines of a fork to mash the roasted garlic into a paste. Set aside.

Place the chopped potatoes in a large stockpot and cover with water. Cover and bring to a boil. Continue to cook uncovered until the potatoes are fork-tender, about 15-18 minutes. Drain well.

Return the potatoes to the warm pot. Add in the butter, salt, milk, and the roasted garlic paste. With an electric mixer, beat on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, adding more milk as needed. Avoid over-beating. *Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Garnish with minced chives. Serve warm.

ROASTED ASPARAGUS WITH HOLLANDAISE
Ingredients:

1 Bunch Asparagus Stalks
2 Tbsp. Olive Oil
Large Pinch Sea Salt
Black Pepper to Taste

Method:

Preheat oven to 400. Meanwhile on a baking sheet, toss asparagus with the olive oil. Arrange stalks evenly on the pan, then sprinkle with sea salt and black pepper.

Roast for 20-25 minutes, shaking the pan halfway through for even, delicious browning.

HOLLANDAISE FOR TWO
Ingredients:

2 Egg Yolks
1.5 Tsp. Lemon Juice
1/4 Cup Butter Melted
Pinch Sea Salt
Pinch Black Cracked Pepper

Method:

There are lots of methods to use when making Hollandaise Sauce. While I want to be a purist and use a double-boiler, I must admit – I have an immersion blender and it is pretty fool proof. These recipes easily double, triple, quadruple, etc. Make Hollandaise for a crowd, by golly! Whichever method you use, here are your options:

Immersion Blender: Place egg yolks and lemon juice in a tall-sided container that isn’t too wide (think a quart-sized soup container). With the immersion blender, combine the egg yolk and lemon juice briefly. Continue to run the immersion blender and dribble in the melted butter. Add a little sea salt and black pepper. You’re done!

Blender: Place egg yolks and lemon juice in the blender. Pulse briefly to combine. Turn the blender on a low setting, take either the whole lid or just that little plastic part in the top off and slow drizzle in the melted butter. Add a little sea salt and black pepper. You’re done!

Double-boiler: Fill a medium pot with a few inches of water. Set on medium-high heat. Place a bowl over the top of the pot, making sure its large enough that the bottom of the bowl does not touch the boiling water underneath. Place egg yolks and lemon juice in the bowl. Begin whisking until combined. Slowly dribble melted butter in, whisking continuously. Add a little sea salt and black pepper. Finito.

Stove-top: NOTE: Don’t pre-melt your butter! Simply cut the butter into little pads. Set a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Moving quickly, whisk the eggs and lemon juice together in the pan. Slowly add a pad or two of butter at a time, whisking continuously and removing the pan from the heat if you feel a curdle coming on. Add a little sea salt and black pepper. Again, you’re all finished!

If however, you’re not done, and your hollandaise broke and isn’t a gloriously, smooth sauce – beat an additional egg yolk in a separate bowl and slowly whisk into the broken sauce, bit by bit. That should do the trick.

This spin on Christmas dinner is pleasing to the eye and palate – and gloriously festive.

Working Against Time

Dr. Jordan Cook of Moore Equine examines a mare’s mouth.

An equine vet takes us through the diagnosis and treatment of a horse with a metal sliver in its tongue.

BY PIPER WHELAN

Recognizing the signs of a horse with metal embedded in its tongue can be the difference between life and death. Acting quickly in this situation is vital to ruling out other ailments with similar symptoms and ensure the problem doesn’t escalate.

“It’s what we would consider an emergency,” says Dr. Jordan Cook of Moore Equine Veterinary Centre in southern Alberta.

“Anytime you have a horse that is either drooling, has a lot of discharge coming from its mouth or its nose, they’re not wanting to eat, or they seem to be having difficulties eating or swallowing, definitely you want to get that horse checked out right away.”

One of these things does not belong here. An X-ray of the mare who was recently discovered with a metal piece stuck in her tongue. Courtesy of Moore Equine.

Horses can get small pieces of metal stuck inside their mouths if it’s in their feed by accident, which may occur if little bits of wire or debris in a hayfield are picked up and baled. Another common way this can happen is when giant tires are used as hay feeders. “There’s little pieces of wire or metal inside the actual tire that’s being used as a feeder itself, and those can break down and then… work their way into the hay, and the horse takes a mouthful and doesn’t realize that there’s a small little piece of metal inside of it,” says Cook.

While metal slivers in horses’ mouths aren’t a frequent occurrence, it shows up enough that it’s something to be on the lookout for. “We see it a couple times a year,” she says. “It’s common enough that it’s something that we’re always have in the back of our mind if we’re seeing a patient that might be drooling or having some difficulty eating.”

Due to these symptoms, it’s often mistaken for choke, colic or a broken tooth. “We’ll have people call in thinking their horse is choking or maybe thinking that their horse might be colicking a little bit because all of a sudden they don’t want to eat,” says Cook.

After ruling out those issues, veterinarians will then look to see if there is a foreign object stuck inside the horse’s mouth. Metal or other objects are more likely to get lodged inside the tongue than embedded elsewhere in the mouth because it’s used to push the food back into their throat when swallowing.

If caught early enough, it’s somewhat easier to remove the metal from the tongue, though it will still require surgery to do so. Under anesthetic, the horse lays on the surgery table and has its mouth opened with a speculum so the surgeon can access the tongue. The surgeon will use the x-rays to guide them in carefully removing the metal from inside the tongue. If metal is left in the tongue too long, however, it can begin to migrate and cause more dangerous problems. The body, Cook explains, tries to dislodge the foreign object itself, but it’s not always able to move it out through the same place that it entered.

“It can actually start to migrate deeper into the throat or actually into all of that tissue that’s under the tongue, in and around the throat, and we can start to see it progress from just difficulties chewing and swallowing and drooling, to all of a sudden that horse is going to have some swelling associated with it. They can actually get an abscess or an infection around something that’s in there, and it may actually obstruct their ability to breathe,” she says.

“There’s lots of really important structures in that area, and so (it’s) a lot more difficult for us to remove or potentially have a higher risk of bleeding during surgery or a higher risk of complications after surgery if we wait too long.”

This is why calling your vet immediately after seeing these symptoms is so important, she states. “Any horse that is drooling, maybe has some nasal discharge, is having difficulty eating or swallowing or isn’t interested in eating, that to me is considered an emergency and should be checked out so that if we do identify that there’s a wire or some other foreign body inside their mouth or their throat, we can try and take it our as soon as possible.”

The culprit. Foreign bodies inside a horse’s mouth can lead to life threatening situations. Here is the metal sliver, after it was removed in surgery.

CASE STUDY: Early Detection for Successful Treatment
Recently, Cook was called to assist a mare that was suspected to be choking. “She was drooling quite a bit, she seemed to want to eat but was unable to do so and so it didn’t seem to resolve,” she says, adding that most mild chokes will resolve on their own within 15 to 20 minutes.

“It was identified very quickly at feed time, so when I came and took a look at her, she didn’t have any discharge from her nose, which is more common that we’ll see that with choke,” she explains. “She had manure in her stall, she was otherwise really bright and when I offered her food, she really, really wanted to eat it, but she’d take it in her mouth and immediately spit it out and drop it, and for her it was because there was a bit of a pain response.”

With this information, Cook administered some sedation and conducted an oral exam, finding the mare’s teeth to be in good shape. There were no other signs of foreign bodies in the mouth, such as pieces of wood stuck between the teeth. The only thing that looked concerning was the mare’s tongue. “I could see that her tongue appeared a little bit swollen in the middle, and I could actually see a little bit of blood, a little nick on the one side of her tongue, and then there was a little bit of swelling on the other side,” she says.

It was painful for the mare when Cook carefully pressed on the swelling, and that resulted in some bloody discharge coming out of the cut on the other side of the tongue. “That made me pretty suspicious that she may have something inside of her tongue.”

Cook’s next step was to take x-rays of the mare’s head, which quickly revealed that there was, in fact, quite a large piece of metal inside her tongue. She gave the mare some anti-inflammatories to reduce the swelling in her tongue and make her feel more comfortable. As they were unsure when the mare was last able to drink, she was tubed through her nose and given water and electrolytes to prevent dehydration before being referred to the clinic that evening.

Surgery was performed on the mare the next morning. “We got really lucky that that piece of wire hadn’t moved,” says Cook. “She was taken into the surgery suite, anesthetized, taken in, the speculum put back in her mouth again. Then thankfully our surgeon was able to go in and – using his hands and some instruments – was actually able to pull the piece of wire out of her tongue very successfully.”

Dr. Cook’s quick-thinking and thorough examination procedure led to the rather fast discovery of the metal piercing in the mare’s tongue.

Another round of x-rays confirmed that all the wire had been removed, and the mare went on to make a great recovery. “She was eating a little bit slower because her tongue was still a little bit painful but was able to happily eat and swallow with a few days of anti-inflammatories.” Back at home, the mare was carefully monitored to ensure she was able to chew and swallow properly as the swelling in her tongue went down.

Even though this situation isn’t a common occurrence in horses, Cook wants owners to be aware that this is something that could potentially happen. “Just because your horse has a little bit of drool or doesn’t seem to be eating, don’t necessarily panic right away that your horse has something stuck in its tongue, but be aware that that is an abnormal behaviour. Especially if the horse does seem bright and really wanting to eat but dropping food and unable to do so,” she says.

“Unfortunately, it can be life-threatening if left and not dealt with right away,” she continues. “If there’s any swelling around the throat or around the jaw, it’s definitely something you want to get checked out right away to make sure they haven’t eaten something, but also making sure that they’re able to eat and drink and breathe properly.”

Gifts for Him

Photo by BAR XP PHOTO.

A wonderful collection of gift ideas for him!! For under the tree, under the saddle, in the barn or in his belly. All are amazing presents from local vendors.

OUTDOOR COVER
This Powder River Outfitters collection fleece bonded softshell jacket from Panhandle features a full zipper front, interior wind flap, adjustable cuffs and is water and wind resistant. Perfect for the man who lives in the outdoors. $139.95. www.lammles.com

Powder River Outfitters jacket from Lammle’s Western Wear.

A NIGHT OUT
A night out is a sweet surprise for anyone. Give a gift that includes great service, a spacious western atmosphere, a fantastic steak and a house-specialty mashed potato wrap. Silver Slate Steak house by Stavely, Alberta offers high fashion dining in a home-style way. Gift Certificates available at www.silverslatearena.com

A hearty meal at Silver Slate Steakhouse is exactly what he wants this year!

Sole Mates
He’ll get a kick out of a Christmas gift from Alberta Boot Company! Outfitting royalty, movie stars, athletes, public figures, and most importantly – ordinary people from all over the world! Alberta Boot Company has a wide selection of ready-made boots and can also help you create the perfect pair for your sole mate this holiday season. www.albertaboot.com

Alberta Boots carries a wide variety of boots for him.

SOLAR PROTECTION
BEX sunglasses are engineered to stay comfortably on your favourite wrangler’s face. Complementing active lifestyles, every pair is lightweight, polarized durable and designed to look great on everyone. The company understands that an active lifestyle causes normal wear and tear on the nose pads, which is why each pair of sunglasses comes with a replaceable set. bexsunglasses.com

Bex Suglasses and a wild rag by Brown Creek Wild Rags. Photo by BAR XP PHOTO.

GRAND TOPPER
The holidays just aren’t the same without a great topper, whether you choose a star, a tree and angel or a gorgeous hat from Prairie Wind Hatworks! Located in Pincher Creek, Alberta, they can make a custom hat from the band up or give a current hat a little bit of TLC. Find them on Facebook @prairiewindhatworks2018

Prairie Wind Hatworks will make the custom lid your guy is looking for.

Holiday Beef Wellington

A twist on a classic. This crowd-pleasing beef wellington is a perfect centrepiece for your next Christmas dinner. By MIKE EDGAR, Photos by TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY BEEF WELLINGTON Ingredients:1.5 Kg Beef Fillet2 Tsp. Vegetable or Sunflower Oil2 x 50g Pack Dried Porcini Mushrooms25g butter, plus extra for the sauce500g (1 lb. 2oz) Shitake Mushrooms, Finely […]

[Continue reading…]

CHIEF CROWFOOT – SOLDIER OF PEACE

Born in 1830 near the Belly River in southern Alberta, his infant name was Shot Close. His parents, Istowun-eh’pata (Packs a Knife) and Axkahp-say-pi (Attacked Towards Home) were Kainai or Blood, of the Blackfoot Confederacy, which also included the Blackfoot and Piegan peoples. If their names were any indication, the times were troubled and warring […]

[Continue reading…]

Western-Styled Gift Guide

Our gift for you is this wonderful collection of gift ideas! As always, we are all for spreading some local cheer with amazing gifts for you and yours. By MONIQUE NOBLE PUT A RING IN ITWhat’s a gift without a box to put it in? For a little extra western flair this holiday season, wrap […]

[Continue reading…]

John McCrae & Bonfire

Dr. John McCrae is most famously known for penning one of history’s most evocative war poems, In Flanders Fields. He served first, in Africa, where he was appalled by the inadequate treatment of wounded soldiers on the battlefield, so much so, that he resigned and severed his military relationships for many years. During WW1, when […]

[Continue reading…]

2021 Ranch Country Horse Sale

The 16th annual Production & Broke Saddle Horse Sale held September 11, 2021 at the Rodeo Grounds of Maple Creek, SK, was another resounding success! This year the event was run by the Jack Auction Group and it once again featured weanlings, yearlings and broke horses. 2021 SALES RESULTS: Foal Average $1,965.00Yearling Average $2,530.00Top 10 […]

[Continue reading…]

Equestrian Halloween

This edition of Western Foodie isn’t so much of a “dish” per se, as it is an event. However, the pièce de résistance charcuterie board prepared by Chef Edgar, does take centre stage! As Halloween is fast approaching, we thought it would be fun to focus on a spooky, equestrian-style party for kids and parents […]

[Continue reading…]