Lonnie West Rides Perfect in Abbotsford to Earn First PBR Victory

Courtesy of PBR Canada

Lonnie West rides Tippin Point in Round 1 of Stop No.5 of the PBR Monster Energy Tour in Abbotsford, BC. Photo by Covy Moore / CovyMoore.com

West rises from No. 10 to No. 5 in Canadian standings as the tour prepares to crown a PBR Canadian Champion next week in Saskatoon.

ABBOTSFORD, British Columbia – Building upon his runner-up finish last weekend in Winnipeg, Lonnie West delivered a perfect 2-for-2 performance in Abbotsford to claim his first career PBR victory at the final regular season event of PBR Canada’s Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K.

West (Cadogan, Alberta) began the Saturday night event with a fifth place effort in Round 1, riding Tippin Point (S&E Bucking Bulls) for 84 points.

In the championship round, the 21-year-old delivered the high-marked ride of his PBR career, making the 8 aboard Anika’s Pet (Big Chief/Armstrong) for 89 points.

His victory earned him $4,260.80, 465 Canadian points and 80 world points.

After beginning the event ranked No.10 in the Canadian standings, West is now the No.5 man in the race for the national title as the tour heads to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan next weekend, Oct. 20-21, for the PBR Canada Monster Energy Tour Finals.

He now trails No.1 Brock Radford (De Winton, Alberta) by 751.66 points.

Radford finished ninth in Abbotsford, earning 20 Canadian points, after riding Hollow Point (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 83.5 points in Round 1.

Zane Lambert (Westbourne, Manitoba) and Jared Parsonage (Maple Creek, Saskatchewan) tied for second after logging matching 169.50-point scores in the aggregate.

Lambert’s event began in Round 1 with an 82.5-point ride on Boom Beach (S&E Bucking Bulls), which he followed with 87 points aboard Spot On (Wilson Rodeo) in the championship round.

The 31-year-old earned $2,405.29, 170 Canadian points and 40 world points.

The 2013 PBR Canada Champion, ranked No.2 in the national standings, now trails No.1 Radford by 379.16 points as he looks to earn his second Canadian title.

After earning a re-ride, Parsonage logged 82 points on Big Rig (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) in the event’s first round.

He concluded the Abbotsford stop with an 87.5-point trip aboard Kalit Karma (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) in the championship round.

For his work Parsonage earned $2,611.46, 180 Canadian points and 40 world points.

Parsonage rose from No.8 to No.7 in PBR Canada standings, now 909.16 points off the No.1 position.

Fresh off his event win last weekend in Winnipeg, Dakota Louis (Browning, Montana) finished fourth after opening his night with a Round 1 win compliments of his 88.5-point ride aboard Overcooked (Vold Rodeo/Prescott).

He leaves Abbotsford with $2,552.55, 160 Canadian national points and 20 world points.

Kale Marks (Sunnybrook, Alberta) rounded out the Top 5, earning $1,195.77, 105 Canadian  points and 15 world points.

His finish was backed by his 86.5-point trip aboard Tweedle Dee (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) in Round 1.

PBR Canada’s Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K next travels to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and the SaskTel Centre on Oct. 20-21 for the twelfth annual PBR Canada Finals. Action gets underway at 7:30 p.m. CT on both Friday and Saturday. Tickets are still available at PBRCanada.com or Ticketmaster.ca.

The event will crown the 2017 PBR Canada Champion who will earn a trip to the Real Time Pain Relief Velocity Tour Finals in Las Vegas, Nevada Oct. 28-30 where they will then have the opportunity to qualify for the Built Ford Tough World Finals on Nov. 1-5.

Be sure to stay tuned to PBRCanada.com and follow the tour on Facebook (PBR Canada), Twitter (@PBRCanada), and Instagram (@PBRCanada) for the latest results

National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s Cowboy Crossings® Opening Weekend generates nearly $1 million in sales

Submitted by the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association

Intricate spur straps created by craftsman, Chuck Stormes. Photo Credit: TCAA.


OKLAHOMA CITY
 – Cowboy Crossings, one of the nation’s foremost annual Western art sales and exhibitions, is now open to the public at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. During Opening Weekend, Oct. 5 – 7, gross sales exceeded $986,310 with a portion of those proceeds benefiting the Museum’s educational programs.
The event and exhibition offers a unique combination of more than 150 pieces of art represented in different mediums featuring the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA) 52nd Annual Sale & Exhibition as well as the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA) 19th Annual Exhibition & Sale.

“We are pleased by the tremendous support for Western art from across the country,” said Chief Financial Officer and Interim President and CEO Gary Moore. “The combination of working art such as saddles, bits and spurs, and rawhide braiding, along with the fine art of painting and sculpture, helps many individuals connect with the West in ways they might not have previously considered.”

Shot glasses crafted by local artist, Scott Hardy, took home top honours. Photo Credit: TCAA.

Clifton, Texas, CAA artist Martin Grelle’s piece, Expectations, was the show’s highest selling piece at $54,000. The highest selling TCAA piece was a sterling silver shot glass set and tray by artist Scott Hardy of Longview, Alberta, Canada, selling for $31,000.   
The CAA exhibition is available through Nov. 26, 2017, and TCAA will be on display through Jan. 7, 2018. Unsold art is available for purchase through The Museum Store at (405) 478-2250 ext. 228. For more information, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/cowboy-crossings. For award-winning art associated with this release, click here.

A full list of winners from the weekend’s awards show is as follows:

  • The CAA Stetson Award recipient, selected by active CAA members as the best compilation of individual works, was Paul Moore of Norman, Oklahoma, for his six bronze sculptures: Old Man Losing His Heron, When His Heart is Down, Tug of War, Blessing at Wuwuchim, Hopi Two Horned Priest, and Young San Felipe Green Corn Dancer. 
  • The Anne Marion Best of Show Award, chosen by anonymous artist judges from the four gold medal winners, was given to Grant Redden of Evanston, Wyoming, for his painting, Feeding the Flock.
  • Jason Scull of Kerrville, Texas, earned the Ray Swanson Memorial Award for his bronze relief, Waitin’ for Daylight. The award is given for a work of art that best communicates a moment in time, capturing emotion.
  • Grant Redden received the Oil Painting Gold Medal Award for his painting, Feeding the Flock.
  • Martin Grelle of Clifton, Texas, received the Oil Painting Silver Medal Award for his painting, Expectations.
  • Whirling Wind on the Plains, a Texas limestone sculpture by Oreland C. Joe Sr. (Navajo/Ute), of Kirtland, New Mexico, was the Sculpture Gold Medal Award winner.
  • When His Heart is Down, a bronze sculpture by Paul Moore of Norman, Oklahoma, was the Sculpture Silver Medal Award winner.
  • Phil Epp of Newton, Kansas, received the Water Soluble Gold Medal Award for his painting, Hilltop.
  • Mikel Donahue of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, received the Water Soluble Silver Medal Award for his painting, The Bronc Stomper.
  • C. Michael Dudash of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, received the Drawing and Other Media Gold Medal Award for his charcoal and chalk drawing, Cowgirl.
  • Tyler Crow of Hico, Texas, received the Drawing and Other Media Silver Medal Award for his charcoal drawing, Cow Camp Studio.
  • The Buyers’ Choice Award, selected by show attendants, was awarded to Tyler Crow for his charcoal drawing, Cow Camp Studio.

    Artist, Tyler Crow. Made in America, Oil, 32” x 26” Photo Credit: TCAA.

The TCAA’s do not confer awards for their pieces in the Cowboy Crossings exhibition, instead choosing to offer cash scholarships to a select number of up-and-coming traditional artists. This year’s fellowship winners are:

  • TCAA Fellowship for Cowboy Craftsmen recipients are Troy Flayharty and Graeme Quisenberry.
  • Mike Eslick received the Emerging Artist Award.

    Saddle with Tapaderos by craftsman, John Willemsma. Photo Credit: TCAA.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
Nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is located only six miles northeast of downtown Oklahoma City in the Adventure District at the junction of Interstates 44 and 35, the state’s exciting Adventure Road corridor. The Museum offers annual memberships beginning at just $40. For more information, visitnationalcowboymuseum.org. For high-resolution images related to the National Cowboy Museum, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/media-pics/.

Shamrock Performance Horses

Tyler, Helen, Jaden and Rowdey Nowosad of Dewberry, AB.

BY GUEST AUTHOR, JESSI SELTE

Shamrock Performance horses owned and operated by Tyler and Helen Nowosad of Dewberry, Alberta, not only showed this years ABRA 1D champion horse, they also trained the DR Nick Bar Granddaughter, Raise The Gold Bar aka “Alley,” at the 2017 Canadian Barrel Horse Incentive Super Stakes held this past weekend in Ponoka, AB.

 

The dynamic duo of Alley and Helen made lasting impressions right from their first competition together in 2015, bringing home the Bohnet’s Barrel Barn Futurity Buckle. With a very successful 2015 season behind them, Alley needed a break as she suffered a wire cut that took her out of the 2016 racing season. Fully healed and well conditioned the team set their sights high for 2017. Long miles on the road did not deter, placing them at the top all spring and summer. August found them at the Alberta Barrel Racing Association Finals in Ponoka, Alberta. After multiple days and consistent runs they secured the 1D champion spot, and the championship saddle.

 

One of many buckles earned by Helen and Raise The Gold Bar.

Every success has a back-story and Helen and Tyler’s is one of hard work and determined nature. The quiet humble couple, live with their two children Jaden (11) and Rowdey (7), three dogs and numerous other barnyard animals just south of the Chuckwagon Capital of Canada in Dewberry, AB. They bought the ranch in November of 2007 and have since upgraded the property to be safe and functional for their broodmares and young stock.

One of the foals produced by the Nowosad family.

With mutual interest and involvement in College Rodeo and roping, Tyler and Helen found each other. Shortly after College Tyler, a welder by trade, focused his energy on taking care of his young family. Competition wouldn’t stay away long though. The young couple persevered through pedigree to find top performances horses. The first being, a DR Nick Bar mare, the horse that Helen developed her outstanding ability as a barrel racer. After much success with the DR Nick Bar line, and collecting four own daughters by the legendary stallion, this would be the start of their elite bred broodmare band. This includes Alley’s sensational Dam “Sweet Fleet Bar.” The DR Nick Bar horses have proven their athletic ability and superior mindsets time and time again.

The couple knew right from the start how important a solid proven foundation would be. Not only did the mares have to prove themselves, but the foals had to perform as well. That thought process led to the Nowosad’s obtaining their double-bred Peppy San badger stallion BSF Northern Boon, aka “Vegas” (Peptos Quick Pick x El Northern Dance).

This next key purchase, Vegas, started as a smooth moving yearling, who caught Tyler’s eye at an auction sale. Tyler had planned to sit on his hands that day, but couldn’t resist a bid. In 2014 the Nowosad’s started crossing Vegas with their DR Nick Bar daughters, and in no time fell in love with the cross. Vegas now is the primary stallion used at Shamrock Performance Horses.

The young stallion and Tyler shared their own success story this spring, when SR Vegas Got Lucky aka “Marley,” was sold to 2016 World Champion Header Levi Simpson. Marley, the first son of Vegas’, found his niche in team roping instead of barrel racing. This allowed Tyler to campaign his skills as a roper and trainer.

Versatility in the performance world can be a hard to achieve. Combining dominant race blood with outcross working cow horse lines, generates an opportunity for the Nowosad’s to utilize all of their abilities. This is very evident in the horses that they are now performing on. This foundation of strong genetics in pedigree will remain stable for years to come.

Jaden and Rowdey are also an integral part of the system. They expose, and challenge the young horses to adhere to the “younger generations” tasks. Further demonstrating the quality of mind produced through the outcross genetics.

With winter fast approaching the Nowosad’s are gearing up for 2018. Fully dedicated, each and every one of them contributes their time, effort and dollars to insuring the success of the program. Helen is currently taking the steps necessary to get Alley on the track to RFD TV’s American Rodeo Richest One Day Rodeo in the World, hosted in Texas February 2018.

The Canadian Barrel Horse Incentive Breeders Sale October 7, 2017 in Ponoka, Alberta, was a strong start to the new season. Where they had a yearling filly “Sweet Northern Nick” entered with her Super Stakes Certificate and selling as the reserve highest bid. This filly is eligible for the added incentive money if run at the CHBI Thanksgiving race in the future. This was the first available yearling horse to be sold out of the program.

However, that was not the end of the Nowosad’s success at the 2017 Thanksgiving weekend. “Alley” held up her end of the bargain as well. With the fastest times on day 1&2 of the CBHI Derby, Helen and Alley had the long wait of being the last run in the Short Go. Excitement coursed through the arena as the dynamic duo “peeled paint” on three exceptional barrels, not only to win, but also to set an arena record at Calnash Center, with a 16.824 sec run. Hard work pays off but does not start nor end in the arena.

The Nowosad family will be busy introducing their exciting young prospects to the training program. Their training program involves many aspects including gentle starts; to develop balance and minds, extensive exposure to kids, dogs and other animals; with consistent training by all four members. One training tip they take very seriously is giving their horses praise. By developing a strong horse/rider bond through praise, the Nowosad’s are able to establish a willing confident partner.

Helen credits mentor NFR qualifier Lee Ann Rust for elevating her confidence and refining the mechanics of the training program. Rust’s insightful instruction has greatly influenced Helen’s guidance of her daughter Jaden.

Tyler and Helen are very excited for the future of their program. As well as watching Jaden and Rowdey make an impression on the rodeo world. The Shamrock may be a symbol of luck, but it’s the dedication of this exceptional family that brings success to Shamrock Performance Horses.

Dakota Louis Sweeps Both Rounds to Win PBR Monster Energy Tour in Winnipeg

Courtesy of PBR Canada

Dakota Louis rides Minion Stuart for 87.5 points in the Championship Round. Photo: Covy Moore / CovyMoore.com

Five riders went a perfect 2-for-2, including home province hopeful Zane Lambert, now ranked No.2 in the PBR Canada national standings

WINNIPEG, Manitoba – Sweeping both Round 1 and the short go, Dakota Louis (Browning, Montana) earned his first event win of the season Friday night at the Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K event at Bell MTS Place in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

The 25-year-old began the night riding Smash (Skori Bucking Bulls) for 85 points in Round 1, before covering Minion Stuart (Skori Bucking Bulls) for 87.5 points as the last rider in the championship round.

The bovine athlete, who hadn’t been ridden in his last three outs, was recently selected by PBR Livestock Director Cody Lambert as one of the five Canadian bulls that will buck at this year’s PBR World Finals in Las Vegas, Nevada on Nov. 1-5.

The win marked Louis’ first title since June 2016 when he won the Touring Pro Division event in Belt, Montana.

Louis’ perfect 2-for-2 performance earned him 80 world points and $8,222.50.

Notching his second runner-up finish of the year, Lonnie West (Cadogan, Alberta) leaves Manitoba’s capital city $5,922.50 richer, having earned 50 world and 270 Canadian points.

In Round 1 the 21-year-old tied for second after making the 8 aboard Ulterra’s Counter Force (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls) for 84.5 points.

In the short go West logged his high-marked ride of the season, covering Heaven’s Basement (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 87.5 points to split the round win with Louis.

West, who began the night No.14 in the Canadian  national standings, rose four positions to No.10 compliments of the finish. He now trails No.1 Brock Radford (De Winton, Alberta) by 1,196.66.

Radford failed to earn any points in Winnipeg, bucking off Milky Chance (Flying Four Bucking Bulls) in Round 1 at the 4.31-second mark.

Zane Lambert (Westbourne, Manitoba) and Cody Casper (Pacific, Washington) tied for third after recording matching scores in both rounds.

The duo opened the night scoring 84.5 points aboard their first round draws. 2013 PBR Canada Champion Lambert became the first rider to cover All Gold Everything (Vold Rodeo/Prescott), while Casper made the 8 aboard Marshals Law (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls).

In the championship round Lambert and Casper both earned scores of 85 points after riding Tykro Liquid Fire (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls) and Finning Mr. Ripley (Flying Four Bucking Bulls) respectively.

Each rider earned $2,875, 25 world and 165 Canadian points.

For Lambert the finish allowed him to surpass Cody Coverchuk (Meadow Lake, Saskatchewan) in the PBR Canada national standings, where he now finds himself ranked No.2, 529.16 behind No.1 Radford, as he looks to earn his second national title.

Coverchuk, much like Radford, also failed to earn any points in Winnipeg after bucking off Double Major (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls) in 2.43 seconds in the first round.

Casper also climbed the rankings in the PBR Canada title race, surpassing Jordan Hansen (Okotoks, Alberta) and rising from No.5 to No.4 in the standings. He now trails the top spot by 722.50 points.

Todd Chotowetz (Major, Saskatchewan) rounded out the Top 5, earning $1,656, 15 world and 95 Canadian points.

The Saskatchewan rider was the final athlete to deliver a perfect 2-for-2 performance after covering Brick Wall (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 82 points in the first round, and Whiskey Hand (Vold Rodeo/Prescott) for 85.5 points in the short go.

First Buckle (Rafter 8 Bulls) was the high-marked bull of the event, earning a bull score of 44 points after dumping Armando Davila Rodriguez (Saltillo, Mexico) in 1.75 seconds in the championship round.

PBR Canada’s Monster Energy Tour, presented by Mac’s and Circle K next travels to Abbotsford, British Columbia and the Abbotsford Centre on Oct. 14 for the final regular season event of the year. Action gets underway at 7:30 p.m. PT. Tickets are still available at PBRCanada.com or Ticketmaster.ca.

Be sure to stay tuned to PBRCanada.com and follow the tour on Facebook (PBR Canada), Twitter (@PBRCanada), and Instagram (@PBRCanada) for the latest results.

 

Barn Hacks

From dream-barn makeovers, to do it yourself stable hacks, we turned to the Western Horse Review readership on Facebook to ask what their favourite tips and tricks are around their own barns. Here are five of our favourite barn renovations we rounded up, big or small.

Revolving Saddle Rack Wall

1. Revolving Saddle Rack Wall. A revolving saddle rack wall is definitely #BarnGoals. When prompted, many of our readers told us that a revolving saddle rack wall was a must-have if they were to build their dream barn. The above image shows how, at just a slight push of the wall, your tack room can be transported from room, to work area. We especially think this is a fantastic idea for busy training operations.

Photo Credit: Corrie EZ Bales via Facebook

2. Fence Post Bridle Rack. Old fence posts are a common occurrence on most farms and ranches, up-cycle them into a great bridle rack. From our Facebook Page, Corrie EZ Bales submitted this photo of her great do-it-yourself bridle rack in her own barn. Corrie says, “We got this idea for our bridles from Winning Strides near Nanton. It is just fence posts screwed to a base & hung on a wall. Sure does keep them bent & tidy!!”

Photo Credits: Lynnman Construction

3. Indoor Trailer Parking . Another of our readers, Brigitte Meyer, commented that if she were to build her own barn she would plan for a bigger blueprint. “Doubling the size of the barn alley way would be nice, in order to be able to drive a rig in. You know, in the event of a rare alberta storm” she quipped. This double-wide barn alley-way comes from Lynnman Construction and we love the trailer parking on one side, with stalls on the other. A great way to save your trailer from the horrible hail storms we all know too well.

Photo Credit: Shed Plans Galore

4. Scratching Post. Have a bucket of old brushes in the tack room? We got a real kick out of this D.I.Y. scratching post. Securely fasten old brushes to a post and put out in your horse’s turnout. We bet they’ve never been happier.

From our Pinterest Pages

5. Swing Out Insulated Water Buckets. This barn-hack was made for cold Canadian winters. The swing out theme continues with swing-out buckets, which can be used for grain, or insulate and use for water buckets in the winter. Ice chipping in the morning, be gone.

Have any other great barn or arena renovations we missed, or some genius barn or arena tips you use that you love? Let us know in the comment section below.

Diary of a Wildfire Summer

A view of the smoke and fires near Easygo Ranch. Credit: Elli Meinert

Summer is generally a season to which most Canadians look forward. But for Lac La Hache, BC, resident Elli Meinert, 2017 was a summer she was glad to bid goodbye. Little did she know that when the province of British Columbia was about to experience one of its worst wildfire seasons in history, Meinert’s home was about to become a highly sought after evacuation zone.

“I remember that on July 6, I got my first Facebook message,” said Meinert. “It read, ‘Can I bring my herd over?’” she relayed. In addition to her own animals, Meinert ended up with 8 extra horses in her care that afternoon. Meinert owns and operates Easygo Ranch, an equine facility bordering a lake, in northern BC. As the events of the summer unfolded, the raging wildfires quickly sparked in several locations in close proximity to the ranch.

“During those early days in July we were watching the fire and there was smoke on the other side of the barn. We had had a fire in that direction 3-4 weeks before. We watched them hit it with retardant and it was gone. But this time, it was different,” she said.

“On July 7, I was by myself and all of a sudden there were water bombers flying right over the house. I phoned my hubby and asked him to come home. On Friday, I hauled horses for someone who was put on Order. And then while I was trying to load horses for someone else – we were put on Alert. I shoved the last horse I could fit in the trailer and went back home. Then the news started coming in. The 108 (a big settlement of houses nearby) were also put on Order.”

To be on “Alert” means officials in the province have advised residents to be ready, in case they must leave. You can leave but you can’t come back. Highways were only open to whatever evacuation route officials deemed safe to travel at the time.

To be on “Evacuation Order” means you have to leave.

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

“At that point, we weren’t just trying to look after our horses or other peoples’ horses – we were making beds for people. My Step-Dad, my neighbours – where else did they have to go? You can’t go to a hotel with two Jack Russells and cats and stuff,” Meinert stated. “So we got really efficient with the dog shuffle (because not all the animals got along). We took in a few extra people and more animals.”

On July 7, Meinert admits they all thought about leaving because the closest fire was too close for comfort. “I had trailers lined up, but soon we realized we couldn’t leave because they closed the highway.”

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

After that, another 15 horses arrived so Easygo’s tally came in at 35. “Some of the owners were stuck on the other side of road blocks. There was an orphan from the SPCA that came. We were looking after them all, full time,” she said.

The human residents of Easygo Ranch were also stuck on a 6-kms travel radius during those days. They were permitted to move around in the radius, but no farther.

“We could go to our gas station corner store, which was good but they quickly ran out of supplies. We were all put on rations: one loaf of bread and one jug of milk per household. It was stupid.

“After chores each day we would all meet up in front of the barn to decide who was cooking dinner that night. One night we had just finished and the power went out. I just wanted a shower… We spent this whole time prepping in case the fire did come to the ranch. We tried to make the place as fireproof as we could. But that night it was distressing. We’d look to the south west and you could see a plume of smoke from the 100 Mile fire. To the north west there was another huge fire from the Chilcotin. And in the north east there was the fire from Williams Lake. We were all just standing there and discussing what we were going to do and then all this smoke started drifting in from across the lake.”

Credit: Elli Meinert

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“I really wasn’t going to leave unless we could take all the horses,” she explained. “We could only take 12 horses and there were clearly more than that.”

Thankfully Easygo Ranch already had great fire suppression systems in place before summer started. These included a dry well located close tot the barn, the lake that could be pumped out of, and an indoor arena with amazing water hoses and generators for power.

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

 

 

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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However there were other things Meinert learned about in the face of a crisis that also helped ride out the storm.

“Val Detweiller used to work in forestry and she contacted me. She was a huge help with her information. She gave me ideas like placing a tarp over the manure pile, to prevent it from catching a spark. We also set up panels in the outdoor arena in case something happened to the barn and I would have to get all the horses outside. The good thing was, Easygo has lots of grass and open areas with sand breaks and driveways in between things. In the worst case scenario, we may have had a massive grass fire but I still think we could have saved our animals. That was my number one priority. Of course, I was also concerned for our own safety – but let the buildings burn if they must.”

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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The group at Easygo Ranch knew that if a fire did come to their doorstep, they would not be able to force it back. Luckily, during those days in July, the fires gave them quite a scare but didn’t progress to the point of destruction for the ranch.

Yet, little did the group at Easygo realize – this would only be the first wave of fires to threaten the area that summer.

“After the first scare, many horses did go home. We only had one group of horses who were owned by people who had all their fences burned down, etc. So they couldn’t return as quickly as the rest.

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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“But then, the second wave of fire evacuations began. We went down to nine horses and then I personally helped evacuate another boarding facility – again. All of a sudden we were back up to 22 horses…”

In the second round, Meinert was able to plan far enough ahead so the second round of horses came in with their own feed. This was a lifesaver for Easygo Ranch, because in the first bout of fires – feed went fast and there was no time, nor opportunity to replenish supplies.

“I fed everyone in the first round but in the second wave, we knew we were going to run out of feed. This time it was like, ‘If you can, please bring your own feed!’”

As July turned to August and finally September, a bit of relief was sighed when officials finally announced the fire situation was under control. Everyone who was housed at Easygo Ranch during the summer fared well.

 

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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Still, it’s not a situation Meinert ever wants to endure again. “Honestly, I hope to never see something like that in my lifetime again. It never needs to happen again,” she states.

A nighttime view of one of the fires that threatened Easygo Ranch during the summer of 2017. CREDIT: Elli Meinert

 

 

Western Thanksgiving

If you’re sitting in your house watching the raging blizzard outside your windows, it’s hard to imagine this coming weekend means Thanksgiving, in October – not a blustery day deep into December or January. However, a snow-mageddon presents the perfect opportunity to do some planning. With Thanksgiving on the horizon, it’s the perfect time to give thanks and reflect on our blessings of the past year. And it’s the perfect time to blend the elements of our western lifestyle around us, into a creative and elegant setting for a feast with our loved ones.

After all, I feel as though no one can do Autumn like western folk can – with harvests done, cattle moved into their winter pastures and much of the horse show year now behind us – this is our season!

The ultimate would be to serve Thanksgiving dinner in the barn. But if you’re inclined to stay indoors near the warmth of a hard-working oven, here are six ideas for integrating your western lifestyle into a beautiful Thanksgiving feast.

Source: Country Living.

1. Pendelton Pumpkins. These sassy, geometrically-designed gourds are certain to be all the rage this year. Get yourself some soft pastel paint colors and washi tape and you too, can create beautiful pumpkins that scream western elegance.

Source: Country Living

Credit: Jenn Webster

2. Mason Jars filled with cutlery. Mason jars have been popular for everything from drinking sweet tea, to featuring beautiful motifs in candle displays. This year, we’re using them at each place setting to carefully delegate eating utensils and napkins.

Source: Tone on Tone

3. An Antler & Pumpkin Centerpiece. This stunning, yet simplistic centerpiece is created with white candles, flowers and antler sheds. Set on top of a white-washed farm table, you can’t go wrong with the artistic western balance of it all.

Credit: Jenn Webster

4. Charcuterie Board. A no-cook way to get the party started. Served on a round wooden slab, a selection of meats, pickled beans, cheeses, grapes and shell-shucked dry roasted almonds can stimulate appetites, while allowing the host a few more minutes for dinner preparation. The addition of a harvest-inspired centerpiece will give your table an elegant western flare.

Credit: Tone on Tone

 

5. Decorate Your Barn with Pumpkins. Who says all the Thanksgiving decor has to be up at the house? Or conversely, bring a barn sign up to your house, to compliment all the fall accents.

Credit: Pinterest

6. Beautifully Set Table. A stunning tablescape will set the tone for your dinner. A table left with a little space for food is good, but a filled table can be gorgeous. Use natural foliage for table accents or napkin holders. Use rustic-looking charger plates and chic glassware to instill an exclusive element.

Olds College Launches New Equine Program

Photo Courtesy of Olds College

Olds College Launches New Equine Reproduction Technician Certificate Program

Olds College is introducing a new one-of-a-kind certificate program dedicated to equine reproduction. Launching in fall 2018, applications will be accepted October 1, 2017 for the new Equine Reproduction Technician (ERT) certificate program. The first of its kind in Canada, the new ERT program is an eight month blended learning certificate program aimed at providing graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to work in or operate an equine breeding facility. The program combines four months of online learning with four months of onsite, hands-on training.

“This is an exciting opportunity for us to offer specialized training for people interested in equine reproduction,” explains Dr. Marion Anderson, Equine Science Instructor, and instructor for the new ERT program. “This program will allow anyone who wants to own, operate, or work in a breeding or foaling facility to gain the skills and experience necessary to be successful.  It will also open doors for students in the Equine Science program, as they will have the opportunity to take the new ERT program to follow up their studies and become certified in equine reproduction.”

Students will learn about the anatomy and physiology of the mare and stallion, as well as breeding management, maximizing fertility, and managing infertility. They will also study the anatomy of early pregnancy, maximizing and caring for periparturient mares, the stages of parturition and the care of the neonatal foal. Students will have the opportunity to participant in the commercial breeding and foaling operation at the College.

“There are a number of benefits to offering this program in a blended online and on campus format,” explains Dalin Bullock, Dean of Animal Science and Horticulture at Olds College. “This format will allow working professionals to take the online courses at convenient times. It also means that their careers and personal lives are impacted for a shorter timeframe.”

Along with the launch of the ERT program, the College has also made significant changes to the existing Equine Science program. Students will now be accepted into the program as either English or Western riders. During the first year, all students will take the same courses that will include basic information on husbandry, science, barn management, farm equipment operation, and breeding, in addition to daily riding courses.

The second year of the program is designed to give students the opportunity to tailor the program to their own interests. In addition to required courses, students will now have the option of choosing from a variety of elective courses including advanced riding, starting and training young horses, coaching, therapeutic riding, rehabilitation therapy, foaling, and driving the draft horse.  Students interested in additional training in reproduction can also take the ERT.

“The Equine Science program at Olds College has developed a reputation for being a national leader in hands on equine training,” explains Bullock. “Thanks to the reputation of our program, we have successfully attracted some of the best instructors in the industry. Dr. Marion Anderson will be instructing the ERT certificate program, while Wendy Johnston, Dwayne McArthur, Fallon Rice, and Joanne Wright, along with newcomers Tara Lambie and Shawn Seabrook will oversee the Equine Science program.”

Olds College is home to the Canadian Equine Centre of Innovation, and one of the largest breeding programs in North America. More information on the new ERT certificate and the Equine Science Program can be found at oldscollege.ca/programs.

For more information, please contact:

Randy Butler
Communications Advisor
Corporate Communications and Marketing

Phone:
 403-507-7717
Cell: 403-396-6548
Toll Free: 1-800-661-6537
rbutler@oldscollege.ca 
www.oldscollege.ca

Ranch Country Horse Sale Results

High Selling Saddle Horse: Seth Abrahamson, Ken Perrin, Tyler Cronkite (Lane Palichuk representative) and Amos Abrahamson. Photo Credit: Terri Mason.


The 13th annual Ranch Country Horse Sale was held on September 9th in Maple Creek, SK. It was a fun and successful day with many quality weanlings, prospects, and broke ranch and rope horses on offer. The 27 broke horses averaged $6,411, with the top five broke horses bringing $10,750. The high seller this year was CD Diamond Jay, a 2012 dun AQHA gelding consigned by Seth Abrahamson. CD Diamond Jay had been used for everything on the ranch, and was handy to sort and doctor on. Thank you to Lane Palichuk of CW Livestock for purchasing this nice gelding for $12,500. The average of the 27 weanlings also on offer was $1,031, with the high seller being a black stud colt sired by Just Plain Rockin, offered by Ken and Marg Perrin, selling for $1,900. Thank you to Calvin and Susan Siegle for giving this colt a great home.

Ranch Country Horse Sale would like to thank everyone – consignors, buyers, bidders, volunteers, and friends – for their support of their sale and hope to see everyone next year.

High Selling Colt: Marg Perrin, Calvin Siegle, Ken Perrin. Photo Credit: Terri Mason.