Make Our Flower Crown

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

The September/October issue of Western Horse Review featured a dainty little flower crown on one our horse models and since fall foliage is so beautiful, we’d thought we share our technique for making one! Collecting wild flowers or nature’s beauty of Autumn is something that you can really enjoy with friends or a loved one.

 

 

The first step is to pick your wild flowers, leaving long lengths of their stems to play with. Gathering flowers and foliage with a friend is always better than going it alone.

 

 

Once you’ve got an array of materials to work with, choose your first flower with a good stem – as this will be the one you build from. Gently split the stem in half to create a small hole (enough to fit another stem through) and stick the stem of your second flower through. Use the second flower’s stem to gently tie a knot to secure it to the stem of the first flower.

 

 

This is our friend Laura – putting together the crown you see on page 14 of the magazine. She was amazing – we pretty much threw the project at her that day. She nailed it.

 

 

Here is the progression of the flower crown, as Laura added more and more flowers. Essentially she would hold one flower in front of the other, wrap the stem under and around the other stem(s) and then back around itself, tying a bit of a knot to secure. Any stems that protruded in a strange way were simply trimmed as needed.

 

 

And finally, we were ready to place our flower crown which worked perfectly as a browband with a western headstall. Here’s our friend Amy, ensuring it sat perfectly on the old mare.

 

 

There are so many ways to enjoy the beauty of the outdoors. This simple craft was a perfect way to give an old mare a delicate look. It could be done with autumn leaves as well, ensuring a photoshoot enjoys all the blessings of the season.

Lessons in Liberty

Jim Anderson was recently featured on a television feature this past weekend. It’s all part of Equus: The Story of the Horse airing Sunday nights on The Nature of Things at 8 PM on CBC-TV. Photo by Jenn Webster.

STORY & PHOTOS BY JENN WEBSTER

Did you happen to catch Equus, Story of the Horse on CBC (The Nature of Things) this past Sunday on TV? In this beautiful documentary that will feature over three hours with anthropologist-turned-filmmaker Niobe Thompson, viewers are taken on an epic journey across 11 countries and back in time to the mysterious beginnings of thehorse-human relationship. Thompson also spends a day in the Canadian Rockies with our friend and  “extreme cowboy” Jimmy Anderson, a professional trainer who has many accolades to his name. Anderson has left the old idea of “breaking horses” behind and he showcases his concepts in the TV feature.

We’ve featured Jimmy in many issues of WHR before, but back in 2016 we had the opportunity to spend a whole day with him, his wife Andrea and their horses. On this very special day, we got an inside look at some of the very first steps in liberty training. As the equine world is constantly shifting, those lessons learned back in 2016 are still applicable today. A well balanced seat and effective discipline-specific skills are no longer the only pursuits of the western rider these days. With the desire to create an even deeper connection with their horses, many western aficionados have turned to liberty to enrich their horse-to-human communication.

Jim and Andrea Anderson.

In unrestrained, free environments accentuated by the absence of tack, a handler can take one’s horsemanship to a new level with liberty. It’s a discipline limited only by a handler’s imagination and it’s reached through a willing partnership.

With a collection of exercises from the 2014 Road to the Horse Champion, Jim Anderson that we’ll detail in a dual-part blog series, you too, can achieve a higher level of learning and ultimately, an increased state of “brokeness” with your horse. Upon closer inspection, you’ll realize that the underlying foundation of liberty is no different than that of any other discipline – it simply allows for a little more creativity upon execution.

TOOLS YOU’LL NEED:
• Rope halter
• Soft lead shank (0.5” thick, 16-feet long)
• Giddy-Up stick (On average,a four-foot dressage whip – depending on the horse.)

It’s important to note a horse must first have an understanding of your cues while still haltered and on your line, before you can turn him loose. If not, your horse will not easily find the answer you’re hoping he’ll reach because he doesn’t understand. Once you’ve laid the foundation for him how to learn, your horse can be successful with liberty. In fact, you are setting him up for success by keeping him on line until he understands your cues 100 per cent.

PREPARING THE HORSE TO LEARN
“When we put any kind of contact or pressure to a horse, he will automatically look for a release or a reward,” says Anderson. “If the horse doesn’t know any better, when you first put pressure on him, his self-preservation kicks in. He will react with fight, flight, a kick or a bite. It’s only after we’ve first taught the horse how to learn and built a foundation for learning, that we can go towards liberty.”

Anderson explains that in order to prepare a horse for learning, a handler must first show the horse how to look for his reward.

“What’s important is that you set the foundation so when your horse is faced with a task, his self-preservation doesn’t kick in and we don’t create worry and fear within him,” the trainer says. “We don’t train for liberty through pressure and punishment – we train through reward.”

He clarifies that the horse will operate from its “self-preservation brain” or from its “thinking brain.” A handler aims to get the horse thinking from the latter so he’s always looking for a reward and not worried about pressure or punishment. After that, you can begin to incorporate body control into the training.

“It doesn’t matter which discipline you go to eventually, it’s all put together by several pieces of basic body control into one maneuver. An example of a higher degree of difficulty maneuver would be the lead change at liberty. In it, you’re asking the horse several things at once. But instead of the horse worrying, he has learned how to think his way through your instruction. You do this by starting with very little, simple things.”

Holding the lead in one hand, you want your horse to walk or trot in comfortable circles around you.

EXERCISE #1
Yielding the Hind Quarters
Working with the horse in a halter on the line and a Giddy-Up stick, the very first goal of liberty in Anderson’s program is to teach the horse how to yield his hindquarters. This exercise is twofold in that it teaches the horse how to physically move his hind end on your cue, but it also brings both of his eyes back to you as the handler – an essential component of liberty. When the horse has both of his eyes on you, he doesn’t have one eye looking out to the pasture.

“In liberty it’s not enough for the horse to be attentive and focused on us – we also need to be attentive and focused on him. With a horse, the focus leaves first and the feet follow. If we don’t have halter and shank attached to it, at liberty the horse can just leave. We have to focused and attentive on our horse, so we keep his focus. We need the ability to divert his attention back to us at any time. That way, we can also join his feet up to us even more,” Anderson explains.

“When the horse’s focus is on you 100 per cent, the join up and the bond between you and the horse becomes really strong. That’s the whole foundation of liberty,” he says.

Hold your Giddy-Up stick in the opposite hand, pointed away from the hindquarters until you are ready to move the hindquarters.

 

“When I want the horse to yield his hindquarters away from me, I hold my inside hand (the one holding the lead) up near his eye and direct my Giddy-Up stick towards his hind feet.” – Jim Anderson

“The goal is to get him to swing his hind end away even just one step, but the main key is to have him put both of his eyes on me as a result.” – Jim Anderson

 

When he does, I relax both my Giddy-Up stick and my focus and reach towards my horse to pet and reward him.

*NOTE: It’s important to note that there is a balance between yielding exercises and joining up. There’s a big difference in teaching a horse how to respond to the Giddy-Up stick, rather than running away from it. It’s normal in horsemanship to train horses to go forward or faster when we longe them – increased pressure from the stick means “go faster” or “move out.” In liberty, a handler must refine the concept with the horse somewhat and teach him that we will put pressure on him with the stick, but when the horse yields away from the pressure with confidence, he is rewarded. He’s still joined up with the handler and not reacting in flight mode. When the horse isn’t worried about pressure, we can finally take the halter off and he won’t leave. Utilizing a Giddy-Up stick should never indicate “leave the handler” to the horse. It’s only after we’ve established exercises like yielding the hindquarters plus other basic body control concepts, that we can then advance into more intermediate liberty concepts. Stay tuned for our next blog and until then – keep your halters on!

Visionaries of the West – Mary Schaffer Warren

 

Mary Schäffer with horse, between 1907-1911, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, Mary Schäffer fonds (V527/ps-151), whyte.org.

Mary Schaffer Warren – Hunter of Peace
By Debbie MacRae

It was the spring of 1908, when a small party of six ascended a ridge of mountains at 8,750 feet, over what is now known as Mount Unwin, to view beautiful Maligne Lake in Jasper National Park, Alberta – the first white persons ever to have witnessed its allure.

Mary Schaffer, her female companion, Mollie Adams, a botanist, three guides, 22 horses, and a dog, were on a quest to locate the mythical lake spoken of by the Stoney Indian Band of Morley, most of whom had never seen it themselves.

Depicted in poetic post-card perfection, Lake Maligne now presents on the covers of travel magazines and brochures – luring tourists to shores once guarded sacredly only by the native hunter. Mary, with her drawings, her camera, and her colored slides, opened the world that lay “away from civilization… lost so far as the world was concerned, in a sea of mountains to the north.”

The paternal branches of her family tree traced back to 1682, as Quaker refugees who had fled from Britain to America, having suffered the persecution of their religious beliefs. British society rejected them and they journeyed with their children to pursue a new start along Pennsylvania’s Ridley Creek.

Each of Mary’s parents married “outsiders”, and their unconventionality and determination formed a foundation of strength for their girl-child, traits, which coupled with her curiosity and rebellious nature, would carry her through the many trials she would suffer in her lifetime.

From a privileged upper-middle-class Quaker family life, Mary received a strong formal education, with enriched extracurricular classes in flower painting, geology, minerology, archaeology, sciences, botany, and natural history. Consequently, she developed strong interest and respect for nature, the indigenous people of North America, and their culture.

After eaves-dropping on a particularly heart-wrenching story told by her “Cousin Jim” in the US army, Mary learned of the advancing tide of white settlement, and the carnage wrought by the removal of western native populations from their land. He spoke of a baby peeping out from under the body of its fallen mother and her horror was so profound, she cried out, and was discovered, and sent to her room. Her introspection led to a love of the native people and the friendship which would eventually lead her to explore the Rocky Mountains on horseback, year after year.

Mary’s first opportunity to explore the “wild west” came when she was 14-years-old. Her father, remembering his own first rail travel at the age of eight, endeavoured to provide his daughter the same experience – across the great plains. Eager to explore the wild and free lifestyle of the western frontier, and its intriguing indigenous populations, Mary was dismayed and saddened to witness instead, the condescension and mistreatment of her “friends.” Yet even at a very young age, she was able to convey a message of affection, compassion and understanding for a very misunderstood race of people.

In 1880, on a steamer trip she made to the Alaskan coast, she explored Native settlements at every opportunity, even against the counsel of her chaperone. Her courage and acceptance led to a lifelong intrigue and fascination with the indigenous lifestyle and she embraced the people with an open heart and mind.

Mary Schaffer’s buckskin shirt, donated to the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies.

As a young adult, she expanded her travel after the 1885 completion of the Canadian Pacific Railroad. She would be accompanied by a chaperone, Dr. Charles Schaffer, who would later become her husband, despite being 23 years her senior. As a physician, and an avid scientist, her husband was devoted to the natural sciences, and in 1889, Mary agreed to accompany her new husband to a scientific gathering in Toronto. On her arrival, she was enthralled by a series of images of Lake Louise, which captivated her imagination. She had to travel there, and only a few short months later she would once again accompany her husband on her first visit to Canada’s wild west.

On that trip she witnessed vestiges of Colonel Wolseley’s boats, abandoned after the 1869 Riel Rebellion. She met Sitting Bull’s brother and his wife, and sought permission to take his picture. She was rebuffed by his request for money, and turned away – regretting her missed opportunity later.

Her first glimpse of the mountains would be from the tiny railway station at Gleichen, Alberta at 4:00 a.m. and that first impression would be indelibly carved in her mind for the rest of her life.

Mary would spend the next several years until her husband’s death, assisting him with his scientific research; studying plants, identifying, pressing, drying, painting, and photographing rare and beautiful botanical specimens. She became known as the “painter of slides,” and was eventually granted a life membership in the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, despite threats of strong opposition due to her gender. At one point, she travelled with Dr. Schaffer on the top of a boxcar, forty miles, to camp outdoors on the shores of Lake Louise!

In 1903, Mary met Sir James Hector, surgeon to the famous Palliser Expedition. Sadly, he would return immediately to his home in New Zealand, after the death of his son to appendicitis. Within a few short months, she too, would lose her mother, her husband, and her father. Mary’s life would plunge into despair; Philadelphia society would shun her; her family would take advantage of her. She would learn the “bitter lesson, to count the pennies, to lean on no one, and make the best of crumbling fortunes.”

But the brief encounter with Sir Hector stimulated Mary to seek solace in the mountains, their majesty and their mystery. She resolved to compose and illustrate the Guide to the Flora of the Canadian Rockies that she and her husband had dreamt about but never started. And so she returned to Lake Louise, entrusted to the care of a young Boer war veteran and guide, by the name of Billy Warren. Under his guidance, she developed the outdoor skills required to complete her mission, and in so doing, became the first non-aboriginal woman to explore the areas encompassed by Banff, Yoho, and Jasper National parks.

A picture of Mary Schaffer-Warren is in her book entitled A Hunter of Peace. The picture  was taken by her friend Mollie Adams in 1907.  It says Moore family fonds (V439/PS-2) WMCR – which references the second edition of A Hunter of Peace with illustrations from photographs by the author and by Mary W. Adams and others – as referenced in the book available at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (WMCR).

In 1911, the Canadian government approached Mary to survey Maligne Lake, a task previously assigned only to men. Her accomplishment as an artist, photographer and writer stood her in good stead. Her survey resulted in the inclusion of Maligne Lake within the confines of Jasper National Park.

Despite being 20 years his senior, Mary would eventually marry her guide and mentor, Billy Warren, to whom she always referred as “Chief,” out of respect for his skills as an outdoorsman. He would build her a home in Banff, which stands to this day as a symbol of the respect she garnered as an accomplished “Mountain Woman,” the name given her by the Stoney people.

In an excerpt of a letter to Raymond Zillmer of Milwaukee from Mary [Schaffer] Warren, on April 12, 1928, she wrote:

“No one may know I went among those hills with a broken heart and only on the high places could I learn that I and mine were very close together. We dare not tell those beautiful thoughts, they like to say ‘explorer’ of me, no, only a hunter of peace. I found it.”

 

Meet our Models

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

Have you seen our September/October issue of Western Horse Review yet? Photographed by the talented Shelby Simmonds of Twisted Tree Photography at Webster Ranch, WHR put together one of our most elaborate fashion shoots to date. Focusing on fall fashion, we had several wonderful people come together to bring this shoot to life. This includes the make-up talents of The Aria Studios and hair by Amber BigPlume. We also shot some amazing Food of the West dishes for future editorial – but we’re going to have to share those with readers in the future. So stay tuned!

For now, we’d like to introduce you to the lovely models seen in our Sept/Oct. fashion spread. Priding ourselves on featuring real people of the horse industry, we thought you might like to get to know them a little bit as well (if you don’t already).

Wearing a couple of outfits from Cody & Sioux, plus modelling some fantastic jewelry designs by Scott Hardy was Wendy Nelson. Wendy owns and operates Wendy Nelson Reining and Performance Horses – a training and breeding facility near Cochrane, Alberta. Wendy has been an active part of the Equine and Reining Horse Industry for 25 years throughout Canada, Europe and the USA. She has bred, trained, and produced many Reining Horse champions and finalists in Futurities, Derbies and Aged events. Wendy has accomplished year-end championship titles in NRHA Germany, Ontario Reining Horse Association, Reining Alberta, Alberta Reined Cow Horse Association, AQHA, and Reining Canada as well as being in the NRHA ‘Top Ten.’ Her coaching skills have led many of her Non-Pros and Youth to the same success.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Next we have our youngest models. Wearing the new EQ3™ helmets from Back on Track and some lovely  back-to-school fashions from Lammle’s Western Wear & Tack these two cuties kicked off the shoot. Both girls are avid riders in real life and can be found playing around with their Miniature horses, or taking in a trail ride on their senior mounts whenever the opportunity presents.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Next we have have Maggie Short. Maggie was the 2016 Calgary Stampede Queen and an avid show jumper. (Check out the past blog we ran about her here!) Besides the “Blake Lively” look she has going on, Maggie is one of the kindest people you could ever get to know and is always eager to help. For instance, on this shoot we had Maggie helping with everything from picking wildflowers, to looking after kids, to picking up our photographer, to packing up clothing at the end. And then, she steps in front of the camera and absolutely nails the shot…

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Next we have Amber BigPlume, who has helped us with a few WHR fashion shoots already. Amber was the 2013 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess and helped spread the word of Indigenous communities in trouble, during the torrential floods Alberta witnessed that same year. She is a talented musician and has been a performer in the Trans Alta Grandstand Show. She is additionally a very skilled hair stylist and has helped us create many looks for WHR fashion spreads. As if that weren’t enough, Amber is a fabulous model and always helps us bring the entire feature together.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Sporting a Smithbilt hat, neckace from Cody & Sioux and a belt from Scott Hardy is Whitney Watson Wilson. As an accomplished competitor in the reining and cow horse competition arenas, Whitney is making a name for herself on the professional show circuit under the guidance of Clay Webster Performance Horses Inc. She recently won the Int. Open Hackamore at the Alberta Reined Cow Horse Association Snaffle Bit Futurity held in Claresholm, AB, and took the championship of the Level 1 Open Derby at the Equistro Cowtown Derby earlier in the year. She helped us saddle and prepare horses for this shoot and although she’s never had to model for WHR before, she pretty much killed it.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

You won’t see this shot in the magazine, but we’re so glad it was suggested that Maggie try on one of our signature Skijor shearling coats, created by Janine’s Custom Creations. We think it was the perfect way to end the day. Stay tuned for some more behind-the-scenes looks from our autumn feature!

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

First Futurity Results Are In!

Submitted by Elaine Good, Photos Courtesy of Barbara Glazer.

Glen Beveridge rides NRR Coles China Doll to the Open Futurity championship.

The first two days of the Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show were dedicated to the Limited Age Event. These are classes restricted to horses just beginning their show careers and competing against horses of the same age for over $12,000 in prize money. It’s also the very first time for the three year olds to be shown and it’s amazing to watch these youngsters! This event is organized by the Saskatchewan Cutting Horse Association to help breeders, trainers and owners develop and showcase their horses and programs. It’s held at the Golden Mile Arena in conjunction with the 4 day Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show where the facilities and great footing allow these horses to show their full potential!

The Barry & Elaine Good Open Futurity Aggregate went to “NRR Coles China Doll” for owner Warren Russell, Stoughton, Saskatchewan under the saddle of Glen Beveridge, Valley View, Alberta. Glen saw this 3 year old mare sired by “NRR Cat King Cole” and out of the mare “Chinas Instant Choice” being worked by Cody Smith at Ponoka, Alberta which prompted a phone call to Warren. Warren said “If you think she’s a good one go ahead and buy her.” He never saw her until she was shown at Moose Jaw! This mare is real sweet to be around and they hope to keep her feeling good and keep showing her through the fall futurities. They want to thank everyone who helped along the way including Clint Christianson, Tyler Darroch and Mike Belof. Thanks from GD Cutting Horses!

Elaine Speight was the victor in the Non Pro Futurity with her great mare, Hickory Boonlight.

The 3 Year Old Non Pro Futurity Aggregate also sponsored by Barry & Elaine Good was claimed by the accomplished showperson, Elaine Speight riding “Hickory Boonlight” owned by Bill & Elaine Speight, Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. The Speights found this blue roan mare, sired by “Boonlights Shining” out of the mare “QR Duals Hickory” advertised on the northernhorse.com website. They purchased her in the fall of her yearling year from Jennell Heptner and had “Boony” started by Anna Petrova of Strathmore, Alberta, as a two year old. Bill continued with training her on cattle, then the flag during the winter and more cattle work into her 3 year old year. The Speights were happy and proud that she did so well at the Moose Jaw Show. With her size, strength in the hind quarters and tremendous long stride they feel she has the potential to make a great horse.

Hesa Rey Cat is a stallion with serious potential, after taking home the derby title with Clint Christenson aboard.

The 4 Year Old Open Derby Aggregate went to “Hesa Rey Cat” owned by the class sponsor Kali Fortner, Bracken, Saskatchewan! Kali’s partner, Clint Christianson trains and shows “Hesa Rey Cat,” the sorrel son of “Dual Rey” that they purchased from Montana Ranch Cutting Horses of Big Fork, Montana. “Hesa Rey Cat” is the third colt that Clint has had the good fortune to train out of the great producing mare “ Shes A Cuttn Cat” and they look forward to his potential both as a show horse and stud prospect.

RH Purralator Cat made breeder and owner, Sandy Reid, proud, by taking home the Non Pro Derby win.

“RH Purrolator Cat” owned and shown by Sandy Reid of Leduc County, Alberta claimed the 4 Year Old Non Pro Derby sponsored by Donna Reid of Webb, Saskatchewan. This home raised gelding sired by “Smooth As A Cat” out of their mare “Jazzys Pep Talk” earned consistent 72’s during the show. “RH Purrolator Cat” is one of a pair of full brothers that Sandy was showing in the 4 year old class! They are both a finished product from Jeff Schwitzer’s Melville, Saskatchewan training program for 3 year olds that were easy for her to take over and show. Sandy says ““Rush” is the horse that won and he is a bit more sensitive that the other. Thank you for having great ground for us to play in that is so important to us competitors!”

Hot Metal Smarts showed off her cow smarts winning the Open Classic for rider, Glen Beveridge.

“Hot Metal Smarts” returned to Moose Jaw after winning the 2017 Open Derby to take this year’s Les & Coreen Jack 5/6 Year Old Open Classic under the saddle of Glen Beveridge. This 5 year old mare by “Metallic Cat” out of the mare “Jazzy Jay Bar” was bred and owned by Hollingworth Farms Limited of Valley View, Alberta. This mare has really come on nice this year and they hope to keep her going for the fall futurities.

The Non Pro Classic championship went to Scott Brady aboard One Cuttin Cat.

The Belof Performance Horses 5/6 Year Old Non Pro Classic Aggregate was won by the 6 year old mare “One Cuttin Cat” for owner and rider, Scott Brady of Midale, Saskatchewan. Scott purchased this mare sired by “One Time Pepto” and out of the great mare “Shes A Cuttn Cat” raised by Montana Ranch Cutting Horses as a two year old from Clint Christianson and Kali Fortner. She was a finalist in last year’s Futurities in Red Deer and Calgary. Scott says “this mare is very sensitive and because of that she makes me a better rider; it’s a challenge that’s good for me!”

Tazalittle and rider Carol Bailey finished off the aged event by captured the 7 Up Champion title.

The turnerhorses.com 7 Up Non Pro Aggregate went to “Tazzalittle” owned and shown by Carol Bailey of Kyle, Saskatchewan. Carol describes her bay gelding sired by “Pepto Taz” and out of the mare “Paulas Little Lena” as her “lifelong partner in this sport. He’s easy to get ready and he knows his job. A true testament to his training foundation.”

Full results of the Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show and Limited Age Event are available on the SCHA Website: www.scha.ca.

It’s a Big Deal: Western Performance at Farmfair

The Canadian National Team Roping Futurity held during Farmfair International is one of the most exciting events to take in. Photo Credit: Northlands.

Farmfair International is one of Canada’s largest agriculture showcases. From November 7-11, Northlands in Edmonton, Alberta fills with over eight halls of western entertainment, including top producing sales, showcases and clinicians. Today Western Horse Review is focusing on what makes Farmfair International so unique for breeders, trainers and enthusiasts of western performance horses. During Farmfair events are held that bolster and boost the equine economy and bring performance horse enthusiasts in by the thousands. So, whether a breeder, trainer, or competitor, how do you get your piece of the Farmfair pie, while showcasing your best up-and-coming bloodstock and prospects? First, you start with the sales.

Two sales are hosted at Northlands for the western performance enthusiast. Photo Credit: Northlands.

The two sales offered during Farmfair International are the place to be. Both sales are the premier auction events for performance horses throughout Canada, with deadlines closing October 1st. For breeders of top performance horses across Canada, the Bloodstock Sale is the premier auction and marketing opportunity for yearlings, two-year-olds and three-year-olds. This year, Northlands is only accepting 20 of the above, and the horses that enter the ring will be highly sought after prospects. An exciting pay back for breeders, trainers and owners that enter their horses in the sale is the Northlands Bloodstock Sale Incentive. Horses that enter the sale ring are eligible to return for the added $10,000 Northlands Bloodstock Sale Incentive in subsequent years and can compete in the futurity of their choosing to win back the added money available to all horses, as well as the incentive money available to them.

Bloodstock Sale
Friday, November 9
Preview at 9 am, sale at 3:30 pm

Directly following the Bloodstock Sale is the Ranch Horse Sale.

The Ranch Horse Sale
Friday, November 9
Preview at 9:30 am, sale at 3:30 pm

Top yearling, two and three-year-old prospects are available at the Bloodstock Sale. Photo Credit: Northlands.

After attending top sales, take in the next level of young performance horses at two futurities offered at Northlands. If you were one of the lucky members in attendance that took home a top prospect from the Bloodstock sale you can sit back and envision your colt or filly competing for the huge added purses, as well as the Northlands Bloodstock Incentive in the coming years.

Barrel Racing Futurity
Saturday, November 10
Start time at 9 a.m.

The electrifying barrel racing held during Farmfair International features $5,000 in added prize money. Photo Credit: Northlands.

The Barrel Racing Futurity is open to any four or five-year-old horse. The Futurity will be two go rounds, with champion declared on average score and a $5,000 added purse. Don’t miss out on blazing fast runs with some of the top barrel racing competitors on the future power horses of the Canadian barrel horse scene.

The Canadian National Team Roping Futurity is one of the most exciting events to take in during Farmfair International. Photo Credit: Northlands.

Canadian National Team Roping Futurity
Sunday, November 11
Start time at 9 a.m.

A guaranteed five head judged event that showcases the best young rope horses in Canada. Open to horses five-years-old and under, the Canadian National Team Roping Futurity has become the premier showcase for roping prospects. Horses compete for $25,000 in prize money and provides breeders and trainers a unique opportunity to promote their horses to team roping enthusiasts from across Western Canada.

So, whether you are raising and training top performance horse prospects, or are riding and showing the best horses in Western Canada, Farmfair International has events for you. The money is waiting, and as the Farmfair slogan says, “It’s a Big Deal.”

Mason Jar Chicken Salad

By MIKE EDGAR, Photos by TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY

 

Tired of horse show concession food? Here’s a healthy recipe you can pack to take with you!

INGREDIENTS:

2 litre Jar

1 Chicken Breast, boneless skinless

1/4 cup Greek Yogurt, plain

1/2 cup Grainy Mustard

1/2 cup Honey

Juice of half a Lemon

1/2 tsp. Kosher Salt

1/2 tsp. Black Pepper

1/4 tsp. Garlic Powder

1 pint Grape Tomatoes, cut into halves

1 Cucumber, diced 1/2 cup

Sliced Almonds 100 grams

Goat Cheese, crumbled

2 cups Baby Arugula

METHOD:

Dressing – Mix yogurt, honey, mustard and lemon juice. Once mixed add almonds, cucumber and tomato. Set aside.

Chicken – Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Season chicken with salt, pepper and garlic powder. Roast for 20 minutes. Let cool, then slice.

 

The jar:

Layer 1 – half of the cucumber tomato mix.

Layer 2 – half the sliced chicken.

Layer 3 – half the goat cheese.

Layer4 – half the remaining Dressing.

Layer 5 – half the arugula. Repeat all layers until jar is full.

Visionaries of the West – The Famous Five

 

(From L to R): Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Louise McKinney, Irene Parlby and Henrietta Edwards – the Famous Five.

By Debbie MacRae

Welcome to our inaugural blog, honoring the Trail Blazers of our past. The Wild West has an infamous history synonymous with cowboys, horses, daring courage, conflict, outlaws, law-makers and law-breakers. Woven into this tapestry of the “wild” are many intriguing characters. Many men and equally intriguing, women of the west, forged through many barriers to create the country of Canada we now call home.

Interestingly enough, it was only 90 years ago that women in Canada were not considered to be “persons.” This is why we kick off our Trail Blazers blog segment with a tribute to the Famous Five (also called “The Valiant Five”) – a group of Canadian women’s rights activists that included Emily Murphy, Henrietta Muir Edwards, Nellie McClung, Louise McKinney and Irene Parlby.

In 1917, the Supreme Court of Alberta ruled that women were persons, but when Emily Murphy put her name forward as a candidate for Canadian Senator, the Canadian Prime Minister at the time, Robert Borden, rejected a petition of nearly 500,000 Canadians, stating he could not, on the basis of an 1876 British common law ruling that stated that “women were eligible for pains and penalties, but not rights and privileges.”

Enter the Famous Five. It took another ten years but on August 27, 1927, Emily Murphy asked four other prominent Alberta women to join her in a petition to the federal government on the issue of women’s status. Irene Parlby, Nellie McClung, Louise McKinney, and Henrietta Muir Edwards joined Emily at her house for tea. That site would later become part of the campus of the University of Alberta.

The question posed was: Does the word “Persons” in section 24 of the British North America Act, 1867, include female persons? The matter became known as the “Persons” Case.

It was debated on March 14, 1928, with the Supreme Court of Canada eventually ruling that women were not “qualified persons” as it related to Section 24 of the BNA Act. Mary Ellen Smith (the first woman to ever be elected to legislature in British Columbia), reacted to the news by saying, “The iron dropped into the souls of women in Canada when we heard that it took a man to decree that his mother was not a person.”

As found on: www.azquotes.com.

The Famous Five, undaunted, appealed to the Privy Council in England, the only authority higher than the Supreme Court of Canada. On October 18, 1929, only 88 years ago, Lord Sankey arrived to a packed London courtroom to declare that women were indeed persons and, as a result, could become Senators. He went on further to state, “The exclusion of women from all public offices is a relic of days more barbarous than ours.”

In 1921, Irene Parlby was elected to the Alberta Legislature for the riding of Lacombe, holding the riding for 14 years. Appointed as minister without portfolio, she was the first woman Cabinet minister in Alberta. She would become the first president of the United Farm Women of Alberta, which organization would initiate changes in legislation affecting credit for young farmers and ranchers, initiate mothers’ allowances and widows’ pensions for farmers and ranchers, and develop provincial departments of health, municipal hospitals, Farm Young People’s week at the U of A, and Farm Women’s Week at Olds Agricultural College, not to mention the first Egg and Poultry Pool established in Canada.

Henrietta Muir Edwards was an artist as well as a legal expert. Women and men alike often came to her for help with legal issues affecting women and children. In 1893, she helped found the National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) — an organization that continues, to this day, to work to improve the quality of life for women, families and society. In addition to her work with the NCWC, she published Canada’s first women’s magazine and established the Canadian YWCA.

Nellie McClung was active in many organizations. She founded the Winnipeg Political Equality League and the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada—”the largest adult education movement in Canada”—and the Women’s Institute of Edmonton, of which she was the first president. She was active in the Canadian Authors’ Association, the Canadian Women’s Press Club, the Methodist Church of Canada, the Calgary Women’s Literary Club, among others.

She sat as a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1921 to 1926, in opposition to the government of the United Farmers of Alberta. Her opportunity to press for women’s rights was limited at this time because women were not taken seriously.

Louise McKinney was a Canadian politician and women’s rights activist from Alberta, Canada. She was the first woman sworn into the Legislative Assembly of Alberta and the first woman elected to a legislature in the British Empire. She served in the Alberta legislature from 1917 to 1921 as a member of the Non-Partisan League. (It was later that she became one of the Famous Five). A former schoolteacher and temperance organizer, she came to Alberta in 1903 as a homesteader.

Emily Murphy was a Canadian women’s rights activist, jurist, and author. In 1916, she became the first female magistrate in Canada, and in the British Empire.

With the Famous Five, we introduce to you to a compilation of stories, intrigue, courage and historical fact woven by the captivating characters of our western past in our Trail Blazers feature.

Unveiling of a plaque commemorating the Famous Five, June 11, 1938. (Front row, L–R): Muir Edwards, daughter-in-law of Henrietta Muir Edwards; J. C. Kenwood, daughter of Judge Emily Murphy; Mackenzie King; Nellie McClung. (Rear row, L–R): Senators Iva Campbell Fallis, Cairine Wilson.

Meet CS Queen Lindsay Lockwood

Western Horse Review sat down with the 2018 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio, Queen Lindsay Lockwood, Princess Jaden Holle, and Princess Jessica Wilson, to discuss their year as Royalty. The women reflect on their biggest moments, their most gratifying connections and what they hope to leave behind as their legacies as they prepare to hand off their crowns to the up-and-coming trio. The Calgary Stampede Queen and Princesses competition is nearing soon and the 2019 trio will be crowned September 24.

Queen Lindsay Lockwood escorts 2018 GMC Rangeland Derby Champion, Kurt Bensmiller on stage to receive his awards.

*Photos courtesy of Calgary Stampede Queen and Princesses

1. What have been your most memorable experiences since your reign as Queen began?

This year has been absolutely packed with memorable experiences and new opportunities, which makes this a very difficult question to answer! My first instinct is to describe the “big” things. Things like traveling to Berlin, and the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. However, I truly believe that what has made this year so special is the sum of all the “little things.” One memory in particular is coming to mind. On the morning we were leaving Berlin, I remember standing outside of our hotel with our Indian Princess, Cieran Starlight. It was a beautiful, clear morning, which made leaving even harder. Cieran invited us to smudge with her before we travelled that afternoon. It was the first time I had smudged. What a beautiful experience! It is in those small moments that I feel the most grateful for this incredible year.

2. Can you please tell us about your experience applying to become part of the royal trio? How did you feel the night you became royalty?

Although it may sound cliché, becoming a member of the Royal Trio has been a life long dream of mine, and so being crowned the Calgary Stampede Queen this year really was a dream come true. There were so many reasons I wanted to apply for this program. I come from a family that is filled with strong and compassionate woman who have contributed to the Calgary community. In fact, I am a 5th generation Calgarian and I am very proud of that fact! I really wanted to give back to my city and the community that has supported me throughout my life. The royalty program seemed like the perfect opportunity to do just that. The initial application process was quite simple. We were required to submit a short essay explaining why we were interested in the royalty program along with a few supporting documents. Then the contest began! The contest itself far exceeded my expectations. It was such a unique and supportive experience. I loved it! Don’t get me wrong, I had my fair share of nerves throughout the month-long process, but overall I had a total blast. Every year, the prestigious reputation of the Calgary Stampede draws such accomplished and dynamic young woman to participate in the royalty search. This year was no different. I met some of the most interesting and admirable woman throughout the contest, and we had a ton of fun together. We participated in speech competitions, judged equestrian shows, and multiple interviews. It was a truly challenging and rewarding process. Crowning night brought a medley of emotions for me. I was thrilled. I was honoured. I was a little shocked. It was the best night of my life up until that point. Little did I know, the magic was only beginning.

The CS Royal Trio and CS First Nations Princess, Cieran Starlight, at the annual Tsuut’ina Pow Wow.

3. How has this experience changed you life?

Have you ever heard someone say, “your life can change in an instant?” If so, then you have a very wise friend. Keep them around. If not, I am telling you now……. it’s SO true. For me, the instant I was crowned was the instant my life changed for the better. I was immediately welcomed into a loving Stampede family that has continued to support me through some big challenges this year. I have made friendships that will last a lifetime. I am especially grateful for my Royal family: Jaden, Jessica, and Cieran. Truthfully, I am getting a little emotional writing this because I really do love these women. They are so incredible. I am so blessed to have them in my life and I will forever be grateful to the Calgary Stampede Royalty program for bringing us together. Being in this role has given me a renewed sense of confidence in myself, and my abilities, that will undoubtedly serve me well in my future.  Whatever it may look like! I have learned the meaning of dedication, and have gained a better appreciation for what it means to be an impactful volunteer and a responsible citizen.

4. The royal trio are often role models for the younger generation, what is the one thing you would like to pass on to those children who look up to you?

I have a few favourite quotes that I keep tucked away in my memory for days when I need words of encouragement. One of my favourite quotes goes like this, “But what if I fall? Oh but my darling, what if you fly?” (Erin Hanson).  This felt like the perfect opportunity to share this quote. It is so easy to let fear prevent us from pursuing our dreams. I would tell those children to go for it! Take risks, and learn from your missteps!

Queen Lindsay and her lovable mount for the year, Blue.

5. Can you please tell us about your royal horse?

This year I have been working with our beautiful mare, Blue. As her name implies, Blue is a 6-year old blue roan. She was started as a working cow horse by our talented trainer, Clay Webster. Blue is the youngest member of the royalty team, and she is a very smart girl! She is a very quick learner.  Last year was Blue’s first Calgary Stampede, and she was a total rock star! It has been only up from there. She has the sweetest personality and loves people, so she really is the perfect royal ride.

6. Have there been any obstacles you’ve had to overcome this year?

This year has been one of the best, but most difficult years of my life. I lost my Mom in March to Multiple Myeloma. She was my greatest supporter, and my best friend. She knew how much my dream of becoming Stampede Queen meant to me, and she told me that the night I was crowned was the proudest moment of her life. My Stampede family has been incredibly supportive of me through this difficult time. Everyday, I try my best to continue to make my mom proud. I know that she is looking down and smiling, knowing that I am still pursuing my dreams.

7. What have been your favourite outfits so far?

We are so lucky to receive such beautiful things, and to represent the brands and individuals who provide them to us. Janine is one of those awesome people we are proud to represent. Janine (Janine’s Custom Creations) is our sponsor and designer, and she is the talent behind many of the unique outfits we wear. Janine is particularly gifted in leatherwork, and she designed and created our custom leathers this year. My favourite outfit we have received are our formal parade leathers. They are made of gorgeous caramel coloured leather with intricate cut outs, and adorned with crystals and fringe. There is something so special about wearing a piece that was created just for you. What makes this custom outfit particularly special to me is the small silver heart on the back of my jacket. Janine added it to represent my Mom, so that I can carry her memory close to me, always.

8. What will you be most sad to say goodbye to when you pass on your crown?

By far, my favourite part about this role is the people. The individuals who dedicate their time to our program and to the Calgary Stampede are simply the best. Our committee is comprised of the most selfless and kind people, who would do just about anything for us. It will be hard to spend less time with them when a new trio is crowned. Having said that, I am positive my involvement with the Stampede will not end when I pass on my crown to the 2019 Queen. I am looking forward to joining the Queen’s Alumni and being involved for years to come!

9. What is your best tip or piece of advice to the ladies that will be vying for the 2019 title?

If you are unsure about running, DO IT! The contest itself is so much fun, and really beneficial. My best piece of advice is to just be you! The judges really want to get to know you, so give them every opportunity to do that. Its not about the clothes or the glitter, its about the people and the passion. Share your passions with the people you meet, and remember that everyone is rooting for you to succeed. Including me!