Western Wedding – Beautiful B.C.

Date: July 13, 2013

Photographer: Sharon Fibelkorn

Ceremony Location: The home of Mike and Carol Roberts Ojai, Califonia

Reception Location: Abbotsford, British Columbia

The Horses: “I had a surprise entrance planned for myself and Ryley Ray (Cayley’s daughter) that only my parents and my bridesmaids (and just a few others) knew about. We were delivered in a horse drawn carriage from a nearby horse. I will never forget the look on Cayley’s face when we came up the driveway, I could see tears that were streaming down his face. I wanted to include Ryley Ray in as much as possible, and this entrance made her feel so special!”Wilson---horses

The Rings: Katie’s ring was a surprise that Cayley had chosen himself. It features a perfectly round, brilliant Certified Canadian Eskimo diamond. Cayley’s ring was chosen by Katie in California; a smooth platinum band with a beveled edge for comfort when he’s riding.

 

Wilson---flowers

Their Story: Katie Montague is a successful Realtor from Ojai, Califonia who never imagined she would end up married to a Canadian working cow horse trainer, but fate had its own way of making other plans.

The horse industry is a small on,e and the working ow horse industry is smaller yet. So when a mutual friend had ideas of setting up Montague and British Columbia trainer, Cayley Wilson, Montague had her mind already made up. However, after a chance meeting in the fall of 2011 and a phone call shortly after, she realized maybe Wilson was a person she had more in common with than she knew.

“What I came to find out was that we were both traveling down similar paths, one that we could share our experiences with and perhaps help each other out in others. We decided to be friends with no expectations. During the four months we talked on the phone, I began to see some amazing traits in this man that I would not have guessed. He was a sincere, honest, integral man and I began to admire him greatly for those attributes. He was passionate about his little girl Ryley Ray, and I loved that too.”

The long distance friendship soon turned into something more when Montague visited Wilson at an Arizona horse show.

“We hit it off well and Cayley drove me back to California on his way home to Canada. An hour later, I got a phone call from him saying that he really didn’t think we could make it work with the distance, and he needed to be close to his daughter . . . I think I fell in love with him a little bit right then and there.”

One year later, they were engaged, and six months following was the small, intimate wedding that they both wanted.

Wilson---engagement-shot

Dress: Katie was stunning in a simple lace gown with material that runched across and tied in at the hip with a lace flower. It had a slit at the hip that allowed some flowered tulle to spill out. The train was minimal, in keeping with Katie’s theme of beautiful simplicity.

Bridesmaids: Dressed in Katie’s colours of coral and turquoise, the bridal party consisted of four ladies. Her maids of honour were her sister and best friend, then her step-sister and sister-to-be rounded out the girls’ side of the party. They wore simple sundresses Katie found at Old Navy with the intent of dressing them in something they could wear again. The flower girl was none other than Cayley’s little girl, Ryley Ray. She was dressed similar to the bride in a darling off-white dress.

Wilson---bridesmaids

Men’s Attire: Cayley’s best man was his brother, with three friends making up his groomsmen. They were dressed in starched jeans, Cinch shirts and their own boots and hats. Cayley was set apart with a classy black jacket.

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Cake: Katie went with a 3-tiered stacked carrot and lemon cake and found a cute cowboy and cowgirl topper. She topped off the cute western design by asking the caterer to decorate the rest with a horseshoe design.

Wilson - cake (650x433)

Wilson - dad & daughter (650x433)

Flowers: In a unique twist, Katie chose all silk flowers for the wedding. “The wedding was July 13 in Southern California, so we had to be prepared for the heat. I didn’t want to have to worry about wilting flowers and silks made it so much easier. No one would have known had I not told them!”Wilson---wedding-party

Wilson - just married (433x650)

Western Wedding – Prairie Love

An excerpt from our January/February issue, where we annually carry a western wedding feature. Be sure to subscribe and catch next years edition.

Date: August 10, 2013

Photographer: Nicole Wade

Ceremony Location: Willow Creek Ranch, Saskatchewan

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Their Story: Ashley is a Saskatchewan farm girl who grew up riding good horses and making her way through the 4H ranks. She was soon led to the rodeo arena, where she competed in college rodeos and progressed to many rodeo associations across Alberta and Saskatchewan. Tyler, on the other hand, did not grow up in the industry, but got his first taste of agriculture at 19, working on a grain farm, outside of Kindersley, Saskatchewan. He stayed with farming, going on to attend Olds College. It was there that he developed a love for roping, which would lead him to compete on the University of Lethbridge college rodeo team when he moved on to study there.

It was the commonality of the love of the rodeo and farming industries that brought the two together. In 2009, the couple met while both were employed at a feedlot outside of High River, Alberta.

“It was love at first sight. After getting to know one another, we realized how much we had in common and found it hard to beleive we were both living in High River, but grew up not far from each other near Kindersley, Saskatchewan.”

After a short time of travelling back and forth, trying their hand at a challenging long-distance relationship, both Ashley and Tyler moved back to Saskatchewan and were engaged by the spring of 2012.

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The Horses: With a background heavily laden with horses, the couple wanted to include them in their big day. Tyler’s uncle drove the groom and groomsmen with his grand team of Clydesdales, while the bride and bridesmaids made their entrance in a wagon driven by a local neighbor.

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Dress: Ashley’s dress caught her eye as soon as she laid eyes on it. It had a pretty sweetheart neckline and feminine layers of lace lining the bottom.

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Bridesmaids: The bridal party dresses were made by Alfred Angelo; chocolate brown in colour, with matching Macie Bean cowboy boots and turquoise jewelry from Arizona.DSC_3766-ruby

Men’s Attire: To pick up on Ashley’s chosen colours, the groom and groomsmen wore turquoise shirts, chocolate brown tuxedo jackets and Cinch jeans; their attire was wrapped up with boots and hats, of course.DSC_3482-ruby

 

Cake: The cake was a 3-tiered creation, wrapped in turquoise and brown ribbon. With a Montana Silversmith cake topper and fondant horseshoes adorning the front, it made a pretty statement for their western wedding.

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Favours: Ashley’s bouquet was one of her favorite parts of the day. It was fashioned from old antique brooches that she had collected, stuffed into the center of white Gerbera daisies and roses. The arrangements were wrapped in burlap and accented with turquoise pieces.

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DSC_4358 ruby (650x433)

Paige Callaway

In our March/2013 edition, we profiled 20 interesting artisans of the West, casting a sweet little spotlight on a few of the most ambitious silver, leather, jewellery and gear makers, fashionistas and even a cake baker. Since then we’ve stayed in touch with nearly all of them, and continue to feed our own inspirations with both their love of the West and independent spirits.

Which was why, when western fashion designer, Paige Callaway, sent an invitation to the launch of her new brand, Pursue Victory, I was intrigued enough to attend.

For one thing, when writer Deanna Beckley initially interviewed her for the feature, Callaway’s words oozed conviction and confidence.

“I feel like positive thinking and action is one of the most powerful things on earth, especially once we grasp the ability to harness it,” she said.  “I think most of my ideas come on road trips. Road trips, good music and hitting every flea market I can find between Calgary and Del Rio. It is endless where one can find inspiration – the trick is harnessing the vision and moving forward with it.”

And secondly, I really needed a new show shirt, and I already loved the look and intention behind the flagship piece of her brand, the Functional Power Collar professional shirt.

pursueartsWhat’s not to love about this logo? Rhetorical question. Particularly since it was created by a designer and photographer we’re blessed and fortunate enough to work with on a regular basis – Natalie Jackman.

pursuepaige&alexHeld at Hotel Arts in Calgary, it was a great evening of fashion and inspiration. I asked my daughter, Alex (on the right) to come with me, and meet Paige (on the left), and we both left feeling the conviction behind this cowgirl entrepreneur.

pursueshirtsAnd with a few purchases in hand.

pursuelabelAlex opted for a unisex tee, and I, the show shirt, which I’ve since worn equally in the show pen, and out on assignment. While it’s not inexpensively priced at $125, each shirt is designed and sewn right in Calgary, making them a 100% Canadian product. And, with the quality and workmanship in the garment, I consider it a lifetime addition to my closet, ultimately translating to a lighter footprint on the earth.

Callaway’s “workshop” is still her computer and a sketchbook, along with a duffle bag of clothes that follow her wherever her adventures and business may take her. “Being able to do business on the spot has proven successful for me. It is similar to the people in Central Park with trench coats and watches, but a lot classier,” she quipped.

Paige really has created a line of clothing that is positive and empowering. Find Pursue Victory on Facebook or visit their temporary website here.

Artisans of the West – Paige Albrecht

Our March 2013 issue featured the Ultimate Artisans of the West. Over the next few months, we’ll profile some of the talented artisans we met, and whose work we fell in love with. To see the full feature, order the back issue

“I want people of the western lifestyle to see themselves in my artwork,” says Albrecht.

Paige Albrecht

Linden, AB
Artist and Leatherwork

Roll young, stunning and talented all into one complete package and you get Paige Albrecht. Raised in the saddle just west of Trochu, Alberta, Albrecht has been a familiar face in the western horse world, not only in the competitive arena but also in the world of art.

Finding inspiration from the world in which she grew up in, from rodeos and horse shows, Albrecht’s subject matter is focused on the modern day cowboy – in the cutting, working cow horse or reining pen, cattle brandings and the rodeo arena. Accuracy and attention to detail are key to the young artist. “I want people of the western lifestyle to see themselves in my artwork,” says Albrecht.

Finding there was a shortage in unique, quality western belts, Albrecht decided make herself one – a sort of prototype.

In 2009, Albrecht added leatherwork to her repertoire. Finding there was a shortage in unique, quality western belts, Albrecht decided make herself one – a sort of prototype. “I was already at tradeshows with my art so I added the belts and they turned out to be a hit with Canadian cowgirls.” When Albrecht designs a belt she tries to envision the type of person wearing it and the style of clothing. Each belt is truly one-of-a-kind.

Albrecht’s subject matter is focused on the modern day cowboy – in the cutting, working cow horse or reining pen, cattle brandings and the rodeo arena.

Albrecht aspires to become a full-time artist and participate in fine art shows like the Calgary Stampede Western Showcase and have her belts on display at functions such as Cowboy Christmas in Las Vegas for the NFR and at the Denver Stock Show and Rodeo.

~Deanna Beckley

Artisans of the West – John Mincer

John Mincer prides himself on his craft. But beyond that lies a deep-rooted respect for that which is sourced, made and appreciated at home.

John Mincer

Mincer Silversmiths
Fallon, Nevada
Silversmith

John Mincer prides himself on his craft. But beyond that lies a deep-rooted respect for that which is sourced, made and appreciated at home.

John Mincer was born and raised in Nevada’s Great Basin and is a third generation rancher. From early in his childhood he was schooled in the traditional cowboy tools that he now designs and manufactures, and he had the opportunity to learn from some of the best. Mincer cut his teeth engraving silver at a cow camp on the Stillwater Range in Nevada. He credits Chet Smith for providing he foundation that sent him on the path to forging a career in silversmithing and engraving.

He credits Chet Smith for providing he foundation that sent him on the path to forging a career in silversmithing and engraving.

With a long list of mentors to credit, including Dan Price and Hugh Weaver, it wasn’t until he met master engraver Franz Markit that he finally fell into his own unique style, that of unmistakable distinct depth and shadowing. He learned that the craft that he had been raised with could be transformed into nothing short of an art and to add a well-defined polish to his own work.

He learned that the craft that he had been raised with could be transformed into nothing short of an art.

Today, Mincer Silversmiths is dedicated to providing unique, high quality, handmade products for collectors, working cowboys and leather crafters across the globe. They strive to design and manufacture items that fit the needs of every individual, first and foremost being usable for everyday working conditions while at the same time being of heirloom quality. Something that they pride themselves on, every piece is produced and hand finished on the Mincer ranch, in the heart of the U.S.A.

~ Dainya Sapergia

Mincer Silversmiths

www.mincersilversmiths.com

Artisans of the West – Heather Baumgartner

Our March 2013 issue featured the Ultimate Artisans of the West. Over the next few months, we’ll profile some of the talented artisans we met, and whose work we fell in love with. To see the full feature, order the back issue.

Heather Baumgartner may have grown up in the heart of Saskatchewan’s prairie metropolis of Regina, but she always dreamt of becoming a cowgirl.

Heather Baumgartner

Spruce Grove, Alberta
Leather Crafter

Heather Baumgartner may have grown up in the heart of Saskatchewan’s prairie metropolis of Regina, but she always dreamt of becoming a cowgirl.

“From as early as I can remember, I was drawing horses and began riding with friends in high school.  It wasn’t until years later – in the early 90’s – that I got my first horse and began showing. It was the start of both my show career and my interest in the artistry of the leather craft,” says the striking craftswoman from Spruce Grove, Alberta.

The seed of Baumgartner’s burgeoning chap and leather crafting business really got started many years ago with a young girl who loved to sew.

In her home studio Baumgartner surrounds herself with western artistry and gains inspiration from both western artisans and the style of today’s fashion.

“As a kid I would sew my own clothes, and later in life I even made a few dress shirts for my husband. Then, about 15 years ago, a fellow down the road needed someone to sew chaps – so I built a few sets of basic chaps for his leather shop – it wasn’t until about four years ago that I decided to take up the artistry of leather making and focused on honing my skills in leather carving.”

From a small Tandy Leather Christmas gift, a number of classes with Ed Collard at the local leather shop and a few trips to classes to Wyoming and Arizona artisan workshops, Baumgartner taught herself the fundamentals. Then, with the help of folks like Don Butler, Andy Stevens, Doug Krause, Bob Park, Steve Mecum and local artisan Peter Swales, she started to refine her skills as a leather maker and established HB Leather on the farm she and her husband Darren own near Spruce Grove, Alberta.

“The biggest challenge is establishing a unique pattern – I like to design pieces that are both stylish and comfortable for the rider.”

In her humble way, she credits her fellow horsepeople for the flourishing demand for her chaps and leatherwork.

“Of course, the business grew from our connection to the performance horse industry. After a dozen years of showing cow horses, reiners and some ranch cutting horses you get to know some great people. It is through those connections and friendships that I’ve been able to continue to grow the business.”

In her humble way, she credits her fellow horsepeople for the flourishing demand for her chaps and leatherwork.

In her home studio Baumgartner surrounds herself with western artistry and gains inspiration from both western artisans and the style of today’s fashion.

“The biggest challenge is establishing a unique pattern – I like to design pieces that are both stylish and comfortable for the rider.”

One of her favourite styles is the use of “finger carving” that she’s worked into both the front and back of many chaps.

Studying the work of Sheridan-style leather makers from years past, testing her designs with countless drawings, and a lot of “test” leather pieces later she’s worked in a few favourites, such as incorporating a daisy into a few designs – “that received a lot of positive buzz!” One of her favourite styles is the use of “finger carving” that she’s worked into both the front and back of many chaps.

~ Ingrid Schulz

Editor’s Note: We’re excited to have the opportunity to showcase a piece of Heather’s work at the Western Horse Review booth this week at the Canadian Supreme in Red Deer. Be sure to come by and view our selection of western artisans work at the booth.

Artisans of the West – Jan Daley

Our March 2013 issue featured the Ultimate Artisans of the West. Over the next few months, we’ll profile some of the talented artisans we met, and whose work we fell in love with. To see the full feature, order the back issue.
 

Back home, with a studio window that faces the western hills, Daley draws inspiration from her surroundings on the ranch.

Jan Daley

Granum, Alberta
Silversmith

Jan Daley is a relative newcomer to the business of being an artisan, with her Juniper Creek sign hanging just a scant two years. Yet the craft didn’t emerge as an epiphany of middle age, but more like a coming of age for a long-harboured passion.

A freehand native etch wrist cuff.

“From a wee girl I’ve always had an interest in metal, wood, and stone and all the artistic avenues I’ve explored through my life have absolutely led to this right here, right now. About 25 years ago I picked up some goldsmithing textbooks and not understanding a word they held, they were set aside. Perhaps the timing wasn’t right. A few years ago I ran across those books and away I went. Fortunately, everything has fallen into place and each of the other artistic avenues has played a contributing factor.”

An oxidized flower concho.

Jan and her husband Mark Daley are deeply immersed in the ranching community. If you were to drive into the foothills of Southwestern Alberta west of Granum and into their ranch, you would most likely find her helping out on the family ranch or in the practice pen working her cutting horse. Her father, Kerm Stav, was the first cutting horse champion of Canada and she’s carried on the torch, with a fierce competitive edge in the same sport.

Combining silver with such natural elements as stone, wood, bone and horsehair she creates pieces that compliment both contemporary and western lifestyles.

Back home, with a studio window that faces the western hills, Daley draws inspiration from her surroundings on the ranch. Combining silver with such natural elements as stone, wood, bone and horsehair she creates pieces that compliment both contemporary and western lifestyles.

Camelite lattice garden wrist cuff.

A ranch gal for all of her life she carries a strong opinion on what western culture means.

“We could spend days talking about this one. It’s keeping your promise on a handshake, which, unfortunately seems to be fading.  It’s respecting and getting to know your neighbour as you would have them respect and get to know you. When people offer to help its because they really want to help, don’t deny them. It’s long days in the field whether on horseback or on tractor. It’s sleep-deprived stormy days and nights calving cows. But when the heat from the sun starts to inject its power into the spring days, it’s hearing the cows rip the new blades of grass as their calves lay soaking up the rays. It’s a newborn colt finding its first legs. It’s the joy and pride of watching the next generations carry on the western tradition.”

Ribbon rock scarf slide.

See more of Jan Daley’s work at Juniper Creek.

~ Ingrid Schulz

Artisans of the West – Beth Broomfield

Our March 2013 issue featured the Ultimate Artisans of the West. Over the next few months, we’ll profile some of the talented artisans we met, and whose work we fell in love with. To see the full feature, order the back issue.

Beth Broomfield happened upon her craft when she decided to try her hand at making herself a turquoise necklace.

Beth Broomfield

Nanton, Alberta
Jewelry Maker

Beth Broomfield happened upon her craft when she decided to try her hand at making herself a turquoise necklace, outfitted with a concho off of an old belt of her Grandmother’s as a pendant. Broomfield sported her new necklace around town and ended up taking orders for three more just like it.

In 2009, Broomfield placed her first order from a supplier in Texas. A few weeks later she ran into Bernie and Marg Brown, owners of Boot Hill in Okotoks, Alberta. Marg fell in love with Broomfield’s hand-made cross necklace and decided to buy a few pieces to sell in the store. The following Saturday she called to order more.

Broomfield’s signature piece is her cross necklace. “I couldn’t tell you how many I have made, but they continue to sell. I keep thinking I want to do something different, but crosses are symbolic in western jewelry and since I don’t expect that to change anytime soon, I’ll continue to build crosses.”

Broomfield is never without her notepad. “I would love to see more of my design sketchbook come to life. It’s loaded with designs I’ve done for home decor, clothing and even tack. I’m not trying to re-invent the wheel with my designs, but I’m passionate about western style and it would be a dream come true for me to see Sunny Go West as a brand people recognized.”

~ Deanna Beckley

 

Sunny Go West

(find on Facebook)

Artisans of the West – Shawna Whiteside

Shawna Whiteside, silversmith and owner of the Sweet Iron Silver Co.

Our March 2013 issue featured the Ultimate Artisans of the West. Over the next few months, we’ll profile some of the talented artisans we met, and whose work we fell in love with. To see the full feature, order the back issue 

Whiteside’s Bronc Pendent, represents the symbolism of the West.

For silversmith Shawna Whiteside, working from her studio near Didsbury, Alberta, creating the feel of the West involves color, creativity and her passion for life. In her work, she combines intricate designs and a splash of color to create a unique western flavor. Whiteside feels she has a passion to create innovative and expressive jewelry, which offers whimsical detail with a modern twist. Her work specializes in the bright cut style western engraving and she also is fond of making custom work, incorporating logos, brands or initials.

“I have a passion for anything that will make a piece a one-of-a-kind or an heirloom. I love adding color, which is why I’m always putting pendants on colorful turquoise, amethyst, or other stones. I also try to mix copper, gold, silver and other metals together to make things pop.”

Whiteside relates she has always had a passion for jewelry, but it wasn’t until she turned 30 that she decided to pursue her passion.

A beautifully crafted silver ring, inspired by western design.

“My mother started doing bronzes around that time. She is an amazing artist and she has always taught me to follow my dreams.”

Inspiration for her jewelry comes from different ideas that might have not been done in the western style. Whiteside says she keeps a notebook in her purse and does quick sketches whenever a new idea comes to life. “I’m always looking in magazines and trying to figure out new ways to wear and engrave, keeping the traditional methods, but putting a colorful or modern twist on them.”

Recently she has gone to Washington to meet and train with Mark Drain, founder of the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association. “He is a hero of mine and a brilliant silversmith. He continues to inspire me to try different things and make every piece the best one I can possibly make it.”

For seven years, Whiteside has been juried into the Calgary Stampede Western Showcase. “I was one of the first artisans they let into the Western Showcase.”

She said the opportunity to show at the Stampede is like winning an Academy Award. “I try every year to incorporate something new or different in my work. It really makes me try to evolve and improve.”

Custom brand bracelet with 10 karat gold scroll.

Visit the Sweet Iron Silver Co. to see more of Shawna’s work.

~ story by Deanna Buschert