Mane Event 2017

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE MANE EVENT

It’s Spring and that means the Mane Event, Red Deer, AB, is just around the corner!

Elevate your riding skills and learn how to communicate better with your horse at the upcoming Mane Event, Equine Education and Trade Fair April 21 – 23, 2017 at Westerner Park in Red Deer, AB. Horse owners and enthusiasts are in for a treat at this very diversified horse expo.  The Mane Event is very proud of their commitment to providing the very best equine related education, shopping and entertainment all at one location.


The mini-clinics this year include some of the best equine educators and clinicians available in a variety of disciplines including; Peter Gray – Jumping; Shannon Dueck – Dressage; Craig Johnson – Reining; Sharon and Storme Camarillo – Barrel Racing; Van Hargis – Ranch Horsemanship; Garn Walker – Cowboy Dressage; Kalley Krickeberg – Horsemanship; Nate Bowers – Driving; and Nicole Tolle – Gaited Horsemanship.

Attendees will also be enlightened by a variety of presenters in the lecture area on saddle fitting, nutrition, equine health, and much more.


The Trainers Challenge is set to be a scorcher this year with Martin Black, Glenn Stewart  and Shamus Haws working with horses from the Ace of Clubs Quarter Horse. The goal of the Mane Event is to have everyone learn including the trainers. In addition, Glenn, Martin and Shamus will each be presenting an arena session on Saturday, and participants are being accepted for their arena sessions.

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Organizers of The Mane Event have not forgotten the upcoming young horse owners and riders – 4H, Pony Clubs and riding clubs! This year they will have a special Youth Lecture Area which will feature some of the clinicians doing special presentations for youth.

Also, be sure not to miss the Friday night Youth Pro-Am sponsored by “Back On Track”. This is an event that teams youth riders and their horses up with Mane Event trainers to ride a timed obstacle course. When the concept was first introduced at last year’s Red Deer Mane Event, the demand to bring it back was very high so here it is again! There is no cost to ride in this competition and prize packages will be offered by Back On Track. Applications are available on the Mane Event website and it is limited to youth riders only.

Youth writers are additionally invited to enter the Youth Essay Contest to win a beautiful, registered AQHA filly generously donated by the Rocking Heart Ranch. The deadline for entries is April 10th – please visit the website for more information.


What would a horse expo be without shopping?!? In the trade show, you will see a diverse group of vendors from across the USA and Canada with only equine products and services, western clothing, equine décor and home furnishings for horse owners and enthusiasts.

After you have shopped and learned from some of the very best in the equine world today, it’s time to relax and enjoy some great entertainment in the “Equine Experience.” This year’s lineup includes the Calgary Stampede Showriders; trick riding by Morgan Stewart; the Millarville Musical Ride, a demonstration by Glenn Stewart, and one by Kalley Krickeberg plus more to come. A schedule for the Equine Experience will be posted closer to the event.

This is a weekend jam-packed with equine education, fun, knowledge and shopping.  Tickets are available in advance (which will save you some money!) or lots at the door – plan now for 3-days of nothing but horses, horses, horses!
Come and experience what people call “The Mane Event”
Visit www.maneeventexpo.com for more information.

Determining Towing Capacity

Wainalta Motors...

Wainalta Motors has the experience and inventory horse owners need, when purchasing a towing vehicle.

 

Are you in the market for a new truck? When it comes to vehicles built for hauling livestock, there’s a lot to consider. How do you determine the right kind of a truck for your needs? Wainalta Motors has been serving clients since 1962, carrying new Chrysler, Jeep, and Dodge vehicles as well as a wide selection of used inventory. Their staff has knowledgeable and personal experience in the hauling of horses and truly understands what’s riding in the back. In this blog, Wainalta Motors answers several of our questions about towing capacity and the changing world of trucks. Here’s what they had to say.

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Q. If I want a vehicle that can tow a 4-horse + Living Quarters gooseneck trailer? And For Ex: If I just need a vehicle that can tow a 2-horse bumper pull?

A. It all comes down to two important factors; 1) how much you’re pulling and; 2) how often you’re pulling that weight. If you find yourself pulling a heavy trailer like a living quarters option, you’ll want to get into a 3500 dually. This would make pulling the LQ, a breeze. The 3500 Ram dually has the highest towing capacity while still getting you the best fuel mileage because your truck doesn’t have to work as hard.

For the 2-horse bumper pull, a 1500 would be more than enough to pull it, but this is where the question of how often are you pulling it comes in. If you’re pulling once every 3 months and just mainly using the truck to get back and forth from work or city trips, the best bet is the Ram 1500, however if you’re pulling all the time you should consider stepping up to a 2500 Ram or 3500 Ram to save money on fuel in the long run.

Q. What does GVWR stand for? (What does it mean?) How do I know I have the proper towing capacity I need?

A. GVWR stands for Gross Vehicle Weight Rating which is the maximum operating weight/mass of a vehicle, as specified by the manufacturer including the vehicle’s chassis, body, engine, engine fluids, fuel, accessories, driver, passengers and cargo but excluding that of any trailers.

It’s important to understand that GVWR isn’t towing capacity – GVWR is the max your vehicle should weigh according to manufacturer’s specifications. GCWR is the maximum allowable combined mass of a towing road vehicle, passengers and cargo in the tow vehicle, plus the mass of the trailer and cargo in the trailer.

The easiest way to check what the capacities of your vehicle would be is to look in your owner’s manual. They also have the GVWR listed on the sticker by the VIN on the driver side door. If however, you want something more specific to your vehicle’s options, you can always call us with your VIN and we would be happy to find out exactly what your vehicle is capable of.

Q. The world is changing – are there any features on trucks today that can help me feel better about my carbon footprint? Is there such a thing as an electric truck, powerful enough to tow livestock?

A. Ram is constantly improving their vehicles. With the introduction of the 1500 Ecodiesel you can get up to 8.4L/100km in realistic driving conditions. Less fuel consumption means a lower carbon footprint. The Ram also has the diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) system which works with a catalyst to reduce nitrous oxide (NOx) emissions. There isn’t an electric truck yet powerful enough to tow. Perhaps we will see one in the future.

 

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Q. What are some 2016/2017 features coming out in Ram Trucks that may add to the comfort my family can benefit from while traveling?

A. Ram offers a ton of comfort features from navigation built right into the console, to heated and ventilated seats. Push-button fold-able mirrors for those tight spaces, built in remote start works with the diesel preheat in the winter, and if you want even more options, you can get automatic windshield wipers and automatic high beams.

IMG_2252Q. Tell us about the back-up camera? How can it assist with hooking up a trailer?

A. If you ever went to back up to a trailer and had to jump in and out 5-7 times, then you’re in luck. The Ram offers two different back up cameras one for backing up to a bumper pull and one that shows the box of your truck. Both of them make hooking up to a trailer a breeze.

Park-assistQ. Are there any park assist / collision prevention / self-driving features available in Ram trucks?

A. The Ram trucks currently offer front and rear park assist. This is a device that senses objects in front or behind the vehicle. It alerts the driver with a tone increasing with volume and frequency, the closer you get to any object. This in conjunction with the backup camera means for less chance of having a fender-bender.

Q. What other safety features can you tell me about in the latest Ram truck models?

A. The big one everyone is talking about right now is distracted driving – and Ram has a solution for it. It offers a hands-free system build right into the interior that can sync up to your phone. It allows a driver to answer calls, or even have texts read aloud to you while you’re driving. Altogether, the system allows you to keep your eyes on the road

Q. Is there anything else you’d like to add?

A. We deliver all over Alberta and Saskatchewan. If you have any questions about vehicle tow rating or want to know if you need to trade up to something that can pull better, don’t hesitate to give us a call we’re here to help! (780) 842-4471

 

Freeze Frame

Western Pleasure

There’s no shortage of equipment out there. With Freeze Frame, we’re going for “useful” too. This month, Lindsay Soderberg tells us about a few of her favorite things for the western pleasure ring. Although this Alberta native has only been training professionally for three years, her accomplishments have really been racking up with a National Snaffle Bit Association World championship and two Congress championships already to her credit.

By Jenn Webster

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– My headstall, reins and saddle are both by Blue Ribbon Custom Tack, out of Phoenix, AZ. My saddle has a Dowdy tree, with Entz tooling, a custom silver package and a black seat.

– The chinstrap on this headstall is a half-inch flat curb chain.

– My hat is from Shorty’s Hattery in Oklahoma City, OK. It is just a western pleasure style, traditional hat in black.

– My chaps are from Hobby Horse. I’ve been wearing them for 16 years now! They are black, fringed ultrasuede. The ultrasuede means they are cooler than leather and can be machine washed.

– The mare I am riding, “Gina” is wearing a small correctional bit on the headstall, also made by Blue RIbbon.

– Gina is sporting a leather-top tail from Broomtails by Val. The unique attachment used in this tail extension ensures the tail hangs naturally and doesn’t appear “fake.”

– My jacket is made of white leather and one I designed myself! I don’t have much time for sewing because I’m so busy riding, but I usually take my ideas to a seamstress and have her sew them up. This jacket sports lots of rhinestones and big square crystals. I always want clothing designs that are complimentary to my horses. I have designed two other outfits for my customers in the past year – it’s something I like to do in my free time.

– My boots are Rios of Mercedes.

– My spurs are custom-made by Tom Balding, with my name on them.

Big Country Farm Toys Sponsorship of Joe Frost

Joe Frost earns 83.5 points on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s Cowboy Cool in Round 9 of the 2014 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (Ric Andersen photo).

Joe Frost earns 83.5 points on Rafter H Rodeo Livestock’s Cowboy Cool in Round 9 of the 2014 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (Ric Andersen photo).

 

Big Country Farm Toys, the fastest growing line of 1:20 scale farm, ranch and rodeo toys in America, has partnered with Joe Frost and the Frost family to offer creative, interactive farm and rodeo life toys which promote great character and values.

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Announcing the partnership during the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, President and CEO for Big Country Toys, Greg Huett, said, “Joe Frost is a college graduate and avid rancher, who just so happens to be the number five bull rider in the NFR going into the Finals in Vegas.”

Joe Frost after the 2014 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo Round 5 buckle ceremony at South Point Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Pictured to Joe’s immediate right is Craig Latham, Joe’s college rodeo coach at Oklahoma Panhandle State University (OPSU), to whom he dedicated his round win. Also pictured: Clyde & Elsie Frost, as well as Joe’s parents, Shane & Lisa Frost (Sara Rempelos photo).

Joe Frost after the 2014 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo Round 5 buckle ceremony at South Point Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Pictured to Joe’s immediate right is Craig Latham, Joe’s college rodeo coach at Oklahoma Panhandle State University (OPSU), to whom he dedicated his round win. Also pictured: Clyde & Elsie Frost, as well as Joe’s parents, Shane & Lisa Frost (Sara Rempelos photo).

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“I noticed common elements in working with both Clyde and Elsie Frost as well as their nephew, Joe. All are interested in creating a positive message for our kids, and both are generous with their own charities,” Huett, explained. “The Frost family giving 100% of their proceeds from the Lane Frost figurine to the Lane Frost Scholarship fund, and Joe Frost donating all of his proceeds from his Frost Fever line of T-shirts at the WNFR to the Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund.”

Joe Frost on his family’s ranch in Randlett, Utah (Sara Rempelos photo).

Joe Frost on his family’s ranch in Randlett, Utah (Sara Rempelos photo).

 
Huett and Big Country Toys introduced the figurines “Challenge of the Champion’s” in 2015 featuring Hall of Fame legend Lane Frost as well as John Growney’s Hall of Fame bull, Red Rock. The successful introduction of the toy and a growing relationship with the Frost family led to the partnership with Joe, second cousin to Lane.

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“Although Joe is his own man, and does not want to live in his cousin’s spotlight, the comparisons are there,” Huett said. The two share more than just a last name. Joe Frost will be competing, like his cousin, for the prized championship buckle. But deeper than talent, Joe Frost carries the known and respected name and character of the Frost family.

Joe Frost receives the 2014 Linderman Award from PRCA Media Director, Kendra Santos, and PRCA Commissioner, Karl Stressman. Joe won $26,624 more than his next closest competitor, 2013 Linderman Award winner Trell Etbauer, the largest margin in the history of the award (Sara Rempelos photo).

Joe Frost receives the 2014 Linderman Award from PRCA Media Director, Kendra Santos, and PRCA Commissioner, Karl Stressman. Joe won $26,624 more than his next closest competitor, 2013 Linderman Award winner Trell Etbauer, the largest margin in the history of the award (Sara Rempelos photo).

Joe Frost won his first national bull riding title in March 2015 at the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo (RNCFR) in Kissimmee, Florida (Sara Rempelos photo).

Joe Frost won his first national bull riding title in March 2015 at the RAM National Circuit Finals Rodeo (RNCFR) in Kissimmee, Florida (Sara Rempelos photo).

 
Big Country Farm Toys is excited about having Joe Frost be a part of the Big Country team. His values of integrity, education and generosity have always been a key part of the western lifestyle and will help the company fulfill its mission of providing wholesome products and role models for today’s youth.

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Parents are tired of the imagination lacking, technological culture that their young kids are being immersed in, and the poor role models that are all too prevalent in today’s media. Big Country Farm Toys promotes the alternative to the disappointment of parents when dealing with bad role models and children being consumed with the tech culture that has consumed this generation, leading to a lack of creativity and imagination brain drain.

Joe Frost earned his degree in Agri-Business from Oklahoma Panhandle State University (OPSU) in May 2015 (Waymen Trujillo photo).

Joe Frost earned his degree in Agri-Business from Oklahoma Panhandle State University (OPSU) in May 2015 (Waymen Trujillo photo).

 
Big Country Farm Toys products are cobranded with some of the top Ag brands including Ford Super Duty Trucks, Sundowner trailers, Aermotor windmills, the PBR and the PRCA.  Their line of over 30 products includes hand painted animals, figurines, vehicles and all the great accessories kid’s need to build their own farm, ranch or rodeos. The toys are both collectible and playable.

Big Country Toys - "For the Country in all of us."

Big Country Toys – “For the Country in all of us.”

 
For more information about this topic or to schedule an interview with Greg Huett please call 1-888.801.4391.

Freeze Frame – Equipped to Work

Travis Rempel runs TR Performance Horses, based in Abbotsford, British Columbia, specializing in working cow horse, reining and cutting horses. He is charging onto the scene, claiming limited open and open victories in all three disciplines across western Canada. When Rempel steps into the show pen, he is there to win and these are the products he relies on to get him to the pay window.

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1.) HAT. “It is an American Hat Company straw. These hats look good, hold their shape well and are durable.”

2.) SHIRT. “This shirt is made by CR Ranchwear out of Texas. They are 100 percent handmade shirts, made in Texas. They have a really nice cut to them and nice patterns – really sharp and crisp.”

3.) CHAPS. “These chaps are made by Diane Olsen of Armstrong, B.C. They are a toast colour with tooled belt pieces. Diane’s chaps are super comfortable and look great.”

4.) BOOTS. “My boots are Tony Lama. They are kangaroo tops, which make them soft, comfortable and I like the look of the lighter bottoms.”

5.) BIT. “The bit in this photo is made by Frank Principe. It is a handmade cow horse bit with lots of tongue relief, balance and feel. Also, Frank does beautiful silver work. Horse really work well and take to this bit.”

6.) HEADSTALL. “By Cowperson Tack, I like their tack because it’s stylish and affordable.”

7.) REINS. “Romels by Steve Guitron. Well-built, affordable and durable for everyday use and showing.”

8.) SADDLE. “This saddle is made by Vaquero Saddlery. There aren’t many around here, but it’s a super soft, comfortable saddle and fits this mare great. A lot of feel to the saddle, I can really feel the horse under me when I ride in it.”

9.) CINCH. “By Weaver, it is an affordable wool cinch. I believe wool fleece is best for pads and cinches.”

10.) SHOW PAD. “This pad is made by Yucca Flats. Like all Yuccas, it has a great pattern and they always turn a horse out nicely.”

11.) UNDER PAD. “I use a Diamond Wool Pad Co. under my pad. I think soft wool fleece is the best thing to have on a horse’s back. It is the most comfortable for them and doesn’t burn or rub like rubber or hard felt can.”

12.) HORSE BOOTS. “I use polo wraps by Classic Equine, they are inexpensive and easy to keep white. When they are wrapped properly, they can supply good support for the horse’s legs. Bell boots and skid boots are by Classic Equine, I like their products because they are durable and tough.”

Freeze Frame – Barrel Racing

There’s no denying it, Sherry Cervi is on fire. The defending world champion barrel racer and her legendary mount, Stingray, light up the dirt in any arena that they run in. So what equipment do they use to set them apart from all of the other girls who are hot on their heels?

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1) BIT. I ride Stingray in a two piece snaffle from the Carolina Bit Company.

2) HAT, SHIRT, JEANS. In this photo, I am wearing a Resistol straw hat, a Resistol shirt from my own collection and Cowgirl Tuff jeans.

3) HORSE BOOTS. I use Legacy splint boots on the front and back legs, made by Classic Equine.

4) PAD. Also by Classic Equine, I use a plain felt pad for under-the-saddle support.

5) SADDLE. I ride a Crown C saddle, made by Martin Saddlery.

Vaquero Lore – The Spanish Spade

SpadeBit2

By Rod Honig

Much maligned, misunderstood and sometimes even feared, the spade bit has been in the hands of horsemen in one form or another for centuries. The current versions we are familiar with date back to the vaqueros of Old California. So what makes a spade bit and how was it really intended to work in a horse’s mouth?

Spade bits are made with many different cheek configurations, with varying height to the mouthpiece or spoon. The size of the mouth is a combination of the spoon height and the staple height (the staple being the inverted U-shaped piece rising about the solid bar joining the cheeks.) The spoon can be found in a simple teaspoon or a shape that resembles a violin, sometimes referred to as an alligator mouthpiece. The common parts of a spade bit are the solid cannon bar, the staple with a copper “cricket” roller in the middle, the spoon, and braces arching from the cheek just above the bar to each side of the spoon and wrapped in copper or with copper beads on them. Either slobber chains or a slobber bar join the two cheeks at the bottom and rein chains are attached to stirrups or loops at the bottom of the cheek pieces. Named very traditionally, cheek pieces can be of the Santa Paula, Santa Susanna, Las Cruces or even cavalry styled s-shanks variety. The most traditional and prevalent design is some variation of the Santa Barbra cheek. Bit makers speak of this cheek being the most balanced as the shape itself lends to the bit returning to a neutral position quickly and easily.

Spade-Bit

Many people question the form and function of the mouth of the spade bit. Before you jump to inhumane conclusions, perhaps consider a few facts. The intention always was and is for the horseman to first train the horse through signal via a hackamore and then transition to an under-bridle ‘bosalita’ in conjunction with a spade bit. It was all about teaching signal only, not the force of pull. To protect the mouth, the horse is able to pick up the bit with the tongue, therefore the solid bar (one that does not collapse like a nutcracker) and braces serve to give it more surface area. The horse could use the braces to hold the bit easily and receive signal clearly. By pure physics, the more surface are that comes in contact with the horses tongue, the more any weight or pressure would be distributed if deployed.

Then there is the physiology of the mouth. A human can fit their entire arm in a horse’s mouth, so at the point where the spoon could touch the palate, the horse’s mouth is quite tall in structure. With a properly adjusted curb strap to curb bit rotation, it is a system designed to protect not harm.

Lastly, an essential part to remember is that the educated bridle horse, at te stage that he is introduced to the spade, has developed a headset that is conductive to carrying the bit in a manner such that through balance, the spade points towards the inside of the mouth, not the roof.

As per the old saying, a bit is only as gentle as the hands using it and the classic spade bit was designed for skilled hands – hands with patience and time to develop a signal.

The Buckaroo Saga

BY ROD HONIG

Welcome to our new column on vaquero lore. In the future we’ll examine the impressive and functional gear and trappings of the vaquero and buckaroo, but first, a history lesson. The word “vaquero” conjures all sorts of images in one’s mind. But who were these skilled ropers and handlers of livestock?

By the 1760’s the trail of Spanish Missions on the El Camino Real was being established. That era heralded the booming livestock industry in California. With the establishment of trade based on hides and tallow to be shipped out of California the need arose for round-ups and the large scale tending to herds. The men tasked with this were the vaqueros. Originally, native Indians and the Spanish were of this class but with intermarriage came not only the Anglo influence but also from them, a new desire to learn the ways of the vaquero. The word vaquero was mutated to the English pronunciation of buckaroo, which many consider to be one and the same.

In later years, these cowboys were noted for riding saddles reminiscent of what we call the 3B or Visalia-style stock saddle. This contradicts the belief that the Wade saddle was part of their gear. (The Wade was popularized, although not created, by Ray Hunt at a much later date). Their ropes, fashioned of braided rawhide, were called La Reata, which the Anglos bastardized to the English word, lariat. The vaqueros were adept at swinging a big loop to rope cattle and dallying for leverage on their saddle horns. Even the word dally comes from the Spanish, dar la vuelta, which loosely translates to taking a turn. Horses were ridden using a braided rawhide bosal to establish communication through signal, coupled with a hand-twisted horsehair rein and lead called a mecate, now often called a McCarty.

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The training progression was to next take the horse into two-rein, meaning using a thinner under-bridle bosal and a spade bit or half-breed, which resembles a spade without a spoon on the mouthpiece staple. This was a transition stage. The final stage was referred to as straight up in bridle in which the horse was ridden solely in a bridle bit with a set of braided rawhide romal reins. As the bits had mouthpieces that were of great height the key, from the hackamore stage to the straight-up stage, was to use headgear predominantly as signal devices, not for leverage unlike many bits in other systems. The snaffle became an addition to the program for many in later years to speed up the progress of the training, but originally the method was all about time — time to develop finesse and exactness in both rider and horse.

Their gear was handmade by the very men that rode and roped daily. So, it needed to be fashioned of readily available material – rawhide, leather and simple iron for the bits. Today’s master gear makers take many of their cues from the older masters – Ortega, Mardueno, Visalia, Tapia and others. The cheeks pieces on today’s bits still remain very close to the original designs in the form of Santa Barbra, Santa Susanna and Las Cruces, along with other designs

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So the next time you see a rider with a flat hat, big loop and rawhide and silver adorning their gear, realize you are not seeing a new trend but homage to an old tradition brought forward to present day.

Artisans of the West – Tom Balding

The demand increased from his customers for his items to be “dressed up” a little, so the silver began to appear.

Tom Balding

Sheridan, Wyoming
Bit and Spur Maker & Silversmith

 

With a passion for the western culture fed through the trainers, competitors and riders that use his product, Tom Balding is still forging ahead in the industry after nearly 30 years.

He explains that one of the biggest difficulties is “creating and maintaining original designs.

A self-taught artist, Balding began building bits and spurs in 1986. Soon, the demand increased from his customers for his items to be “dressed up” a little, so the silver began to appear. To this day, he still has the same inspirations and satisfaction in what he does. It is seeing the bits and spurs in use on the trainers and riders that are his customers and the design process that he employs through his customers and employees that he still enjoys to this day. He takes pride in having some of his employees with him for over 20 years.

But with all of the success that Balding has found in the market, it has its fair share of challenges for him. He explains that one of the biggest difficulties is “creating and maintaining original designs. Companies in China have been copying American made bit designs at a lower quality and cost. This has created an inequality in the market.”

After so many original designs created and hanging in the mouths of horses around the world, he still finds his inspiration simply through his everyday interactions.

After so many original designs created and hanging in the mouths of horses around the world, he still finds his inspiration simply through his everyday interactions.

After so many original designs created and hanging in the mouths of horses around the world, he still finds his inspiration simply through his everyday interactions. Sometimes he will free hand concept drawings that will later make its way into a formal prototype. The creative freedom that he enjoys has been hard earned, but Balding still stays at the helm of the production process that makes Balding Bits and Spurs one of the most prominent makers in the industry.

~ Dainya Sapergia

Tom Balding Bits & Spurs

www.tombalding.com