Eggs Benedict

There is honestly nothing we love more on a lazy Sunday morning, than the chance to sleep in and make Eggs Benedict for a late morning brunch. This recipe has been handed down to me and the Hollandaise sauce is truly what makes it – no packaged sauces around here!

The sauce is honestly the hardest part of the recipe, which is why I’ll focus mostly on that here. But let me tell you, when it all comes together on a perfectly poached egg, with two freshly cooked pieces of bacon and a nicely toasted English muffin, this is heaven on a Sunday!

 

Hollandaise Sauce

• 2 Eggs (separated)

• 1/2 Cup Sour Cream

• 1 Tbsp. Tarragon Vinegar

• 1 Tbsp. Lemon Juice

• Dash Tobasco Sauce

• 1/2 Tsp. Salt

• 1/4 lb. Butter

Separate the eggs and set aside the whites for other uses. Whip the yokes, sour cream, salt and liquids together until smooth and yellow. Pour into a small sauce or frying pan and stir on low heat. Do not allow sauce or frying pan and stir on low heat. Do not allow mixture to boil. Add butter in small amounts, stirring until it melts. Serve when hot. It is imperative the mixture does not boil because it will separate. If it does, whip it back together until smooth.

If you need some tips on poaching eggs, check out this site: The Spruce

The trick to bringing everything together at the same time is to ensure your bacon and sauce are made prior to toasting the English muffins and poaching the eggs. Once you’ve got your bacon and sauce made, set them aside. Then once your water is boiling, put your English muffins into toast and crack your eggs to poach at almost the same time.

When eggs are cooked, add a layer of bacon on top of a toasted muffin. Then add the poached egg on top and finish with generous dollop of Hollandaise sauce.

As an aside, this Hollandaise recipe can’t be beat over top of cooked asparagus, crab melts, or steak. Enjoy!

CFR Fashion Inspiration

If you’re headed to the Canadian Finals Rodeo next week, we’ve got some outfit inspiration for you! There’s no denying it’s the perfect venue to bring out the good stuff. We also know it can  be tricky to stay warm in a Canadian winter and look amazing at the same time. Not to worry, we’ve got you covered! No matter your preference – boho, traditional, vaquero, urban, haute couture, or gyspy – this blog aims to satisfy the cowgirl fashionista in all of us.

Layering is a big deal this year. As seen in this look by The Wacky Wagon Fashion, a turquoise kimono and tee are paired with strands of beautiful turquoise necklaces.

Cody & Sioux just brought in these perfect new poncho arrivals, just in time for a winter storm! Unlike a wrap, these cozy beauties slip over your head and promise to keep you warm and fashionable all evening long.

Savannah Sevens can seemingly do no wrong. This faux fur boa fling is the ultimate accessory. With its gorgeous variation in color and lined satin inside, it’s the perfect item to drape yourself fashionably in warmth. Shown styled with The Lonesome Dove hat, Tallon Necklace and Burke Necklace.

 

This adorable (and comfortable!) fleece “slouch” sweatshirt from Rodeo Tuff is feminine, cozy and versatile. It’s designed with an exceptionally plush fabrication, in a classic pullover fit with a wide neck that can be worn pulled off the shoulder.

 

Sweaters and tees with cheeky sayings are all the rage. Wear them on their own, or pair them with kimonos, denim jackets or dusters. This one from Tonic Equestrian will make you look fabulous no matter where you are and is an essential for any fashionable equestrian! This stylish, easy to wear top is designed to drape comfortably over the body with a wide neck and ribbed waist.

Mustard is the color of the year this year. If you’re looking for a dressier look this CFR, then a mustard colored duster is the way to go. We love this look from The Lace Cactus.

Denim on denim, plus an ivory silky faux fur vest by Dylan, literally warms our hearts on a chilly day! This is another look from Savannah Sevens, featuring a Ryan Micheal shirt and a puffer style vest by Dylan. Shown styled with The Doc Bar Wallet, Calhoun Earrings, Rogue River Necklace and The Bronc Buster shirt.

This look from Classic Rodeo in Nanton, AB, features a shirt from Double D Ranchwear, a Goldspring Hat, and Navajo Pearls.

Don’t let your CFR outfit planning be overwhelming this year. These looks will take you stylishly from day to night and keep you warm in the process. See you in Edmonton!

 

Shamrock Performance Horses

Tyler, Helen, Jaden and Rowdey Nowosad of Dewberry, AB.

BY GUEST AUTHOR, JESSI SELTE

Shamrock Performance horses owned and operated by Tyler and Helen Nowosad of Dewberry, Alberta, not only showed this years ABRA 1D champion horse, they also trained the DR Nick Bar Granddaughter, Raise The Gold Bar aka “Alley,” at the 2017 Canadian Barrel Horse Incentive Super Stakes held this past weekend in Ponoka, AB.

 

The dynamic duo of Alley and Helen made lasting impressions right from their first competition together in 2015, bringing home the Bohnet’s Barrel Barn Futurity Buckle. With a very successful 2015 season behind them, Alley needed a break as she suffered a wire cut that took her out of the 2016 racing season. Fully healed and well conditioned the team set their sights high for 2017. Long miles on the road did not deter, placing them at the top all spring and summer. August found them at the Alberta Barrel Racing Association Finals in Ponoka, Alberta. After multiple days and consistent runs they secured the 1D champion spot, and the championship saddle.

 

One of many buckles earned by Helen and Raise The Gold Bar.

Every success has a back-story and Helen and Tyler’s is one of hard work and determined nature. The quiet humble couple, live with their two children Jaden (11) and Rowdey (7), three dogs and numerous other barnyard animals just south of the Chuckwagon Capital of Canada in Dewberry, AB. They bought the ranch in November of 2007 and have since upgraded the property to be safe and functional for their broodmares and young stock.

One of the foals produced by the Nowosad family.

With mutual interest and involvement in College Rodeo and roping, Tyler and Helen found each other. Shortly after College Tyler, a welder by trade, focused his energy on taking care of his young family. Competition wouldn’t stay away long though. The young couple persevered through pedigree to find top performances horses. The first being, a DR Nick Bar mare, the horse that Helen developed her outstanding ability as a barrel racer. After much success with the DR Nick Bar line, and collecting four own daughters by the legendary stallion, this would be the start of their elite bred broodmare band. This includes Alley’s sensational Dam “Sweet Fleet Bar.” The DR Nick Bar horses have proven their athletic ability and superior mindsets time and time again.

The couple knew right from the start how important a solid proven foundation would be. Not only did the mares have to prove themselves, but the foals had to perform as well. That thought process led to the Nowosad’s obtaining their double-bred Peppy San badger stallion BSF Northern Boon, aka “Vegas” (Peptos Quick Pick x El Northern Dance).

This next key purchase, Vegas, started as a smooth moving yearling, who caught Tyler’s eye at an auction sale. Tyler had planned to sit on his hands that day, but couldn’t resist a bid. In 2014 the Nowosad’s started crossing Vegas with their DR Nick Bar daughters, and in no time fell in love with the cross. Vegas now is the primary stallion used at Shamrock Performance Horses.

The young stallion and Tyler shared their own success story this spring, when SR Vegas Got Lucky aka “Marley,” was sold to 2016 World Champion Header Levi Simpson. Marley, the first son of Vegas’, found his niche in team roping instead of barrel racing. This allowed Tyler to campaign his skills as a roper and trainer.

Versatility in the performance world can be a hard to achieve. Combining dominant race blood with outcross working cow horse lines, generates an opportunity for the Nowosad’s to utilize all of their abilities. This is very evident in the horses that they are now performing on. This foundation of strong genetics in pedigree will remain stable for years to come.

Jaden and Rowdey are also an integral part of the system. They expose, and challenge the young horses to adhere to the “younger generations” tasks. Further demonstrating the quality of mind produced through the outcross genetics.

With winter fast approaching the Nowosad’s are gearing up for 2018. Fully dedicated, each and every one of them contributes their time, effort and dollars to insuring the success of the program. Helen is currently taking the steps necessary to get Alley on the track to RFD TV’s American Rodeo Richest One Day Rodeo in the World, hosted in Texas February 2018.

The Canadian Barrel Horse Incentive Breeders Sale October 7, 2017 in Ponoka, Alberta, was a strong start to the new season. Where they had a yearling filly “Sweet Northern Nick” entered with her Super Stakes Certificate and selling as the reserve highest bid. This filly is eligible for the added incentive money if run at the CHBI Thanksgiving race in the future. This was the first available yearling horse to be sold out of the program.

However, that was not the end of the Nowosad’s success at the 2017 Thanksgiving weekend. “Alley” held up her end of the bargain as well. With the fastest times on day 1&2 of the CBHI Derby, Helen and Alley had the long wait of being the last run in the Short Go. Excitement coursed through the arena as the dynamic duo “peeled paint” on three exceptional barrels, not only to win, but also to set an arena record at Calnash Center, with a 16.824 sec run. Hard work pays off but does not start nor end in the arena.

The Nowosad family will be busy introducing their exciting young prospects to the training program. Their training program involves many aspects including gentle starts; to develop balance and minds, extensive exposure to kids, dogs and other animals; with consistent training by all four members. One training tip they take very seriously is giving their horses praise. By developing a strong horse/rider bond through praise, the Nowosad’s are able to establish a willing confident partner.

Helen credits mentor NFR qualifier Lee Ann Rust for elevating her confidence and refining the mechanics of the training program. Rust’s insightful instruction has greatly influenced Helen’s guidance of her daughter Jaden.

Tyler and Helen are very excited for the future of their program. As well as watching Jaden and Rowdey make an impression on the rodeo world. The Shamrock may be a symbol of luck, but it’s the dedication of this exceptional family that brings success to Shamrock Performance Horses.

Diary of a Wildfire Summer

A view of the smoke and fires near Easygo Ranch. Credit: Elli Meinert

Summer is generally a season to which most Canadians look forward. But for Lac La Hache, BC, resident Elli Meinert, 2017 was a summer she was glad to bid goodbye. Little did she know that when the province of British Columbia was about to experience one of its worst wildfire seasons in history, Meinert’s home was about to become a highly sought after evacuation zone.

“I remember that on July 6, I got my first Facebook message,” said Meinert. “It read, ‘Can I bring my herd over?’” she relayed. In addition to her own animals, Meinert ended up with 8 extra horses in her care that afternoon. Meinert owns and operates Easygo Ranch, an equine facility bordering a lake, in northern BC. As the events of the summer unfolded, the raging wildfires quickly sparked in several locations in close proximity to the ranch.

“During those early days in July we were watching the fire and there was smoke on the other side of the barn. We had had a fire in that direction 3-4 weeks before. We watched them hit it with retardant and it was gone. But this time, it was different,” she said.

“On July 7, I was by myself and all of a sudden there were water bombers flying right over the house. I phoned my hubby and asked him to come home. On Friday, I hauled horses for someone who was put on Order. And then while I was trying to load horses for someone else – we were put on Alert. I shoved the last horse I could fit in the trailer and went back home. Then the news started coming in. The 108 (a big settlement of houses nearby) were also put on Order.”

To be on “Alert” means officials in the province have advised residents to be ready, in case they must leave. You can leave but you can’t come back. Highways were only open to whatever evacuation route officials deemed safe to travel at the time.

To be on “Evacuation Order” means you have to leave.

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

“At that point, we weren’t just trying to look after our horses or other peoples’ horses – we were making beds for people. My Step-Dad, my neighbours – where else did they have to go? You can’t go to a hotel with two Jack Russells and cats and stuff,” Meinert stated. “So we got really efficient with the dog shuffle (because not all the animals got along). We took in a few extra people and more animals.”

On July 7, Meinert admits they all thought about leaving because the closest fire was too close for comfort. “I had trailers lined up, but soon we realized we couldn’t leave because they closed the highway.”

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

After that, another 15 horses arrived so Easygo’s tally came in at 35. “Some of the owners were stuck on the other side of road blocks. There was an orphan from the SPCA that came. We were looking after them all, full time,” she said.

The human residents of Easygo Ranch were also stuck on a 6-kms travel radius during those days. They were permitted to move around in the radius, but no farther.

“We could go to our gas station corner store, which was good but they quickly ran out of supplies. We were all put on rations: one loaf of bread and one jug of milk per household. It was stupid.

“After chores each day we would all meet up in front of the barn to decide who was cooking dinner that night. One night we had just finished and the power went out. I just wanted a shower… We spent this whole time prepping in case the fire did come to the ranch. We tried to make the place as fireproof as we could. But that night it was distressing. We’d look to the south west and you could see a plume of smoke from the 100 Mile fire. To the north west there was another huge fire from the Chilcotin. And in the north east there was the fire from Williams Lake. We were all just standing there and discussing what we were going to do and then all this smoke started drifting in from across the lake.”

Credit: Elli Meinert

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“I really wasn’t going to leave unless we could take all the horses,” she explained. “We could only take 12 horses and there were clearly more than that.”

Thankfully Easygo Ranch already had great fire suppression systems in place before summer started. These included a dry well located close tot the barn, the lake that could be pumped out of, and an indoor arena with amazing water hoses and generators for power.

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

 

 

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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However there were other things Meinert learned about in the face of a crisis that also helped ride out the storm.

“Val Detweiller used to work in forestry and she contacted me. She was a huge help with her information. She gave me ideas like placing a tarp over the manure pile, to prevent it from catching a spark. We also set up panels in the outdoor arena in case something happened to the barn and I would have to get all the horses outside. The good thing was, Easygo has lots of grass and open areas with sand breaks and driveways in between things. In the worst case scenario, we may have had a massive grass fire but I still think we could have saved our animals. That was my number one priority. Of course, I was also concerned for our own safety – but let the buildings burn if they must.”

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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The group at Easygo Ranch knew that if a fire did come to their doorstep, they would not be able to force it back. Luckily, during those days in July, the fires gave them quite a scare but didn’t progress to the point of destruction for the ranch.

Yet, little did the group at Easygo realize – this would only be the first wave of fires to threaten the area that summer.

“After the first scare, many horses did go home. We only had one group of horses who were owned by people who had all their fences burned down, etc. So they couldn’t return as quickly as the rest.

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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“But then, the second wave of fire evacuations began. We went down to nine horses and then I personally helped evacuate another boarding facility – again. All of a sudden we were back up to 22 horses…”

In the second round, Meinert was able to plan far enough ahead so the second round of horses came in with their own feed. This was a lifesaver for Easygo Ranch, because in the first bout of fires – feed went fast and there was no time, nor opportunity to replenish supplies.

“I fed everyone in the first round but in the second wave, we knew we were going to run out of feed. This time it was like, ‘If you can, please bring your own feed!’”

As July turned to August and finally September, a bit of relief was sighed when officials finally announced the fire situation was under control. Everyone who was housed at Easygo Ranch during the summer fared well.

 

CREDIT: Elli Meinert

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Still, it’s not a situation Meinert ever wants to endure again. “Honestly, I hope to never see something like that in my lifetime again. It never needs to happen again,” she states.

A nighttime view of one of the fires that threatened Easygo Ranch during the summer of 2017. CREDIT: Elli Meinert

 

 

Western Thanksgiving

If you’re sitting in your house watching the raging blizzard outside your windows, it’s hard to imagine this coming weekend means Thanksgiving, in October – not a blustery day deep into December or January. However, a snow-mageddon presents the perfect opportunity to do some planning. With Thanksgiving on the horizon, it’s the perfect time to give thanks and reflect on our blessings of the past year. And it’s the perfect time to blend the elements of our western lifestyle around us, into a creative and elegant setting for a feast with our loved ones.

After all, I feel as though no one can do Autumn like western folk can – with harvests done, cattle moved into their winter pastures and much of the horse show year now behind us – this is our season!

The ultimate would be to serve Thanksgiving dinner in the barn. But if you’re inclined to stay indoors near the warmth of a hard-working oven, here are six ideas for integrating your western lifestyle into a beautiful Thanksgiving feast.

Source: Country Living.

1. Pendelton Pumpkins. These sassy, geometrically-designed gourds are certain to be all the rage this year. Get yourself some soft pastel paint colors and washi tape and you too, can create beautiful pumpkins that scream western elegance.

Source: Country Living

Credit: Jenn Webster

2. Mason Jars filled with cutlery. Mason jars have been popular for everything from drinking sweet tea, to featuring beautiful motifs in candle displays. This year, we’re using them at each place setting to carefully delegate eating utensils and napkins.

Source: Tone on Tone

3. An Antler & Pumpkin Centerpiece. This stunning, yet simplistic centerpiece is created with white candles, flowers and antler sheds. Set on top of a white-washed farm table, you can’t go wrong with the artistic western balance of it all.

Credit: Jenn Webster

4. Charcuterie Board. A no-cook way to get the party started. Served on a round wooden slab, a selection of meats, pickled beans, cheeses, grapes and shell-shucked dry roasted almonds can stimulate appetites, while allowing the host a few more minutes for dinner preparation. The addition of a harvest-inspired centerpiece will give your table an elegant western flare.

Credit: Tone on Tone

 

5. Decorate Your Barn with Pumpkins. Who says all the Thanksgiving decor has to be up at the house? Or conversely, bring a barn sign up to your house, to compliment all the fall accents.

Credit: Pinterest

6. Beautifully Set Table. A stunning tablescape will set the tone for your dinner. A table left with a little space for food is good, but a filled table can be gorgeous. Use natural foliage for table accents or napkin holders. Use rustic-looking charger plates and chic glassware to instill an exclusive element.

Red Lentil Humus

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

When it comes to first class sideline picnics, preparation is key. So when Western Horse Review had the opportunity to take in a polo event with a group of our closest friends and we realized we didn’t have the time to prepare some amazing food ourselves, we enlisted the help of the Deane House. While watching a few chukkers, the Red Lentil Humus quickly became a crowd favorite. The Deane House has graciously shared their wonderful recipe with is. Here are their insider instructions for creating this wonderful light, appetizer:

Photo by Natalie Jackman, www.have-dog.com

Ingredients:

1 L red lentils (rinsed and drained thoroughly)
1 L water
33g garlic cloves smashed
½ cup white wine
1 head roast garlic
5 medium sized roma tomatoes, wood grilled for 6 minutes

Method:

– Simmer the mashed garlic and white wine.
– Add the remaining ingredients.
– Cook on medium heat covered until lentils are completely tender.
– Remove from heat.

To Finish:

300g Highwood Crossing canola oil or Mountainview canola oil
17 g salt
7g Okanagan sumac
½ cup toasted & ground coriander (or fresh coriander berries 
 crushed)
½ g Broxburn jalapeño peppers; smoked, dried and ground into
chipotle powder
40 g white wine vinegar

Method continued:

Puree the cooked lentils using a handheld immersion blender.
Blend in the remaining ingredients except sumac.
Allow the hummus to cool to room temperature before folding in the sumac.
Refrigerate until chilled then serve.

Sept/Oct WHR available now!

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

As if the invigorating editorial and photo journalism of the September/October issue of Western Horse Review weren’t enough, there are so many behind-the-scenes aspects that we thought we should let you in on the action!

 

In one of our competitor interviews, Louisa Murch White had the chance to speak with Kirsty White, the Canadian professional barrel racer on a consistent hot streak in 2017 with no plans of slowing down. White tells us about her go-round win at Calgary, her main mounts and a little bit about what it’s like to live a day in her life.

Then we featured Donna Wilson of the rural community around Chain Lakes, AB, and  a fourth-generation rancher who passion and main discipline is bronze artistry. Wilson says, “There is such rich imagery in the life we lead here!”

Wilson’s Anchor Bar Bronze is situated in a gallery she shares with good friend and photographer, Debra Garside in Longview, AB. From her trademark works utilizing the intricate use of antlers within a bronze, to her Longhorn cattle pieces, to the artworks that display horses and the western lifestyle, you can read about them all in our Sept/Oct issue.

Carman Pozzobon. Photo by Covy Moore.

In our Fall Run health profile, we spoke with several top professionals in our industry and asked them how they keep their mounts in top condition, during peak fall competitions. Barrel trainer Carman Pozzobon (Kamloops, BC) told us about her Equifit Nerostim Massager, while trainers Dale Clearwater (Hanley, SK) and Dustin Gonnet (Cayley, AB) open up about their feed programs and the importance of versatility in training. Reining specialist Locke Duce of High River, AB, mentions the benefits of Pulse Therapy in his daily regime. Learn their top tips and more in our in-depth piece for the final gauntlet of the show season.

Savanna Sparvier, 2017 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

On pages 42-49, we showcase the best in autumn western fashion. Shot by the talented Callaghan Creative Co., this special photojournalism piece took us from the Calgary Polo Club, to the backyard our own Sally Bishop’s in Nanton, AB, to the runways of the Vulcan Airport. We were so lucky to be joined by a group of beautiful models and authentic horse women, for this amazing feature. On the cover and in the picture above, you’ll find the stunning Savanna Sparvier, the 2017 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess.

Did we mention – we had the turquoise, coyote fur jacket (with Pendleton®️blankets) by Janine’s Custom Creations, custom-made for this issue of the magazine?

If readers could have been with us on that day they would have seen a huge crew of talented people, hustling at every location to get the models in make-up, hair and dressed for an optimal moment in front of the camera.

Stay tuned for an upcoming blog solely about on our behind-the-scenes action from the Fall Shoot!

A solar waterer. Photo by Esteban Adrogue.

In our How-To feature, we tell you about an innovative solar waterer created by Rob Palmer of Nanton, AB, that got his ranch off the grid. Even in the brunt of a cold winter, Palmer can rely on solar power to water his cows and keep his monthly service provider bills to a bare minimum.

Paul Brandt has taken his success as a musician and used it as a launching pad for many incredible philanthropic purposes.

 

We also had the chance to interview the iconic Paul Brandt in the Sept/Oct issue, the most awarded male Canadian country music artist in history. In this compelling editorial, Louisa Murch White got the chance to speak with Brandt about music, his philanthropic work and his most recent #NotInMyCity campaign.

Launched just prior to the 2017 Calgary Stampede. the #NotInMyCity campaign raises awareness about human trafficking in Calgary, AB. A tough subject to talk about and an even tougher one to fight – but Brandt feels strongly that with awareness and recognition of the serious problem in our own backyard, the public can stand together against it.

Brandt partnered together with local designer Paul Hardy to design scarves and bandannas to help raise funds for the campaign. Hardy says of his design, “…Visually, I hoped to create a motif throughout the bandana and scarf that would not only be bold from afar, but also suggest a community of friendship and a worthiness of trust for those who wear it to stand in solidarity with victims against human trafficking.”

We had the opportunity to photograph these beautiful scarves in our fall fashion shoot. Blowing in the wind, the image suggests freedom. It’s a campaign Western Horse Review supports wholeheartedly.

The #NotInMyCity scarf. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

The September/October issue of Western Horse Review is available now but with more inciteful editorial on the horizon, you don’t want to miss an issue! Get your subscriptions up to date at: http://www.westernhorsereview.com/magazine-subscription/

Polo, This Weekend

Photo by have-dog.com

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If you’re looking for an exceptional experience this weekend, why not come out to the Calgary Polo Club this Saturday August 12, to watch the Canadian Open – Smithbilt Hat Day at 2:00 pm? Featuring the Canadian Open Match Game (12 Goal), fans can watch Highwood vs. Château D’ESCLANS.

This weekend will also showcase their regular 4-goal games on Sunday, at 12 and 2pm.

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The combination of speed, control and horsepower in polo is intoxicating. If you’re looking for some great family fun on the sidelines, or longing to renew your passion for equestrian sport, the Calgary Polo Club (CPC) is the perfect place for all levels of enthusiasm.

It’s interesting to note that some of Calgary, Alberta’s best polo players originally came from the discipline of team penning. People from a medley of other events find themselves enamoured with the sport, the first time they crush the ball down the field.

Photos by Callaghan Creative Co.

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Polo culture involves tailgate picnics. Bring some chairs, a basket of delicatessens, a charcuterie board and cold beverages and your gathering of friends will think you picnic like an event-planner.

Social members can take in all the field-side exhilaration with the option to reserve white tents to block out the warmth of the sun on hot days. White VIP tents with designer leather furniture can additionally be reserved for a fee to make it a Sunday Funday like no other.

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

Photo by have-dog.com

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The sport of kings is dependent on the grace of equines. Men, women and children can all enjoy the game of polo, because the horse is an extraordinary equalizer.

There a few things you may want to know, before you go. The rules of the game are based on the right of way of players and the “line of the ball,” created each time the ball is hit. Once the ball is struck by a player an imaginary line is formed, creating the right of way for that player. No other player may cross the line in front, as doing so results in dangerous play. Crossing the line in front of speeding horses at right angles, is the most common foul in polo.

THROW IN: Umpires start the game by throwing the ball between the two teams that are lined up on different sides.

KNOCK IN: The defending team is allowed a free ‘knock-in’ from the place where the ball crossed the goal line if the ball goes wide of the goal, thus getting ball back into play.

RIDE OFF: Involves safely pushing one’s horse into the side of the opponent’s mount to take him or her off the line. Contact must be made at a 45-degree angle or less and only between the horse’s hips and shoulders.

HOOKING: This is the action of blocking another player’s shot by hooking or blocking his or her mallet.

OFF-SIDE: The right side of the horse.

NEAR-SIDE: The left side of the horse.

Horses in play have their tails braided and manes shaved to avoid the hazard of becoming entangled in a players’ mallets and/or reins. White pants worn by riders is a tradition that can be traced back to the 19th century in Britain and India, where the game was played by royalty only and in very hot temperatures. Hence, the preference for fabrics that were light in colour and weight. The shaft of a polo mallet is akin to the soul of a good horse; strong, resilient and adaptable. Polo mallets have magnificent flexibility and strength.

Lastly, spectators are encouraged to back their vehicles up to field, all the while maintaining a safe, 20-foot distance from the sideboards. At times, players may send their horses over the boards in pursuit of the ball – and you don’t want to be in their way.

 

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

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No matter the type of hat you wear, there is a level of polo participation for everyone. Perhaps Western Horse Review will see you out there! For more information on tournaments and events at the Calgary Polo Club visit: www.calgarypoloclub.com.

*Make-Up credit to The Aria Studios, Hair by Meagan Peters, Outfits by Cody & Sioux.

 

 

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Mother’s Day Gift Ideas

Happy Mother’s Day!

 

BY ESTEBAN ADROGUE

With Mother’s Day just around the corner, Western Horse Review wanted to give you a hand selecting the right gift for the most important woman in your life. If you need a last minute gift idea, here are a selection of our favorite items, available online now. Show Mom how much she means to you with these great ideas!

Who doesn’t love a pair of new boots? These Aztec, All-Around Square Toe Boots, from Noble Outfitters, are perfect for the Mom on the go! With a tough, leather exterior and an interior with lightweight Physio Outsole, designed for ultimate comfort, they are perfect for the woman who’s always on the move.

$239. Check out: Noble Outfitters.

With all the hard work she does, the least you can do is ensure Mom’s horse is comfortable. “The Rancher” 5 Star Saddle Pad is the ideal gift! Designed for all those ropers and ranchers out there, this super thick 1-1/8” wool pad eliminates double padding and reduces cinching, excellent for long trial rides! Not a Roper or a Rancher? Not to worry! Visit the  – 5 Star Equine Products website for many other saddle pad options and disciplines to find the perfect gift for Mom. $263.95.

What defines a mother is the love and commitment she had for her children, whether they have two or four legs! Maybe it’s time to treat yourself by treating that 1,500lbs, lovable goof in your life with a brand new “Mesh Sheet” from Back On Track. Their amazing Welltex fabric, reflects the horse’s own natural body warmth creating a soothing thermal warmth – the horse will not get over heated, but the sheet allows sweating to relieve and loosen inflamed or sore muscles. It also helps increase blood circulation and speeds muscle recovery. It’s the closest thing to a good, old fashioned bear hug for your furry creature! Starting at $199.

This beautiful dark leather bridle with extensive silver buckles, conchos and accents is designed for the Cowgirl within you! Make Mom’s horse look fantastic – and by extension, you look fantastic – with this piece from HB Leather.

Complete Mom’s outfit with beautiful hand-made belts, bracelets and accessories from Noble Outfitters offers many mix-n-match options such as the Aztec bracelet and belt. Why not top it off with an Ombre headband? Perfect for those cold days in which she wants to ride and still look great! (Even though Mom always looks great, right?) $22.95-$69.99.

Finish Mom’s special day by treating her to an amazing culinary experience. Gaucho Brazilian BBQ is a one of a kind Brazilian Barbecue. Experience the original taste of Churrasco, an authentic barbecue style made famous by Gauchos – the cowboys of South America. Want to become the best husband ever? Obtain a gift certificate from Gauchos, offer to take care of the kids, and let her enjoy a night to herself with her friends instead! (If you are lucky enough, she might even brag about how good of a man you are!)
Located in Calgary and Canmore. To make a reservation or for more information visit Gaucho Brazilian BBQ online.