Big Moves in B.C.

Bull rider, Coy Robbins, enjoyed a productive and lucrative weekend as he captured the title at the first-ever Valley West Stampede in Langley, British Columbia riding Duane Kesler Championship Rodeo’s 675 Circus Freak for 88.5 points and $5,773.

With the 2022 Canadian Professional Rodeo season winding down, one of the most critical weekends of the fall took place entirely in the nation’s westernmost province. Sunny skies, big crowds and spectacular performances were the order of the day at Armstrong, Merritt and Langley, BC.

The SMS Equipment Pro Rodeo Tour wrapped up over Labour Day weekend with the final tour stop (IPE and Stampede) and Finals in Armstrong, BC. While most of the season leaders held on to claim the overall tour titles and the champions’ trophy spurs, there was come-from-behind drama in the bareback and bull riding events. 

Reigning Canadian Bareback Riding Champion Clint Laye put together an 89-point effort for second place ($2,713) in the regular Armstrong Pro Tour rodeo, then added an 88.25 ride on Calgary Stampede’s Bigtimin Houston to take top spot in the Finals for another $2,320. The twin successes vaulted the Cadogan, AB. cowboy from third place entering the weekend to the SMS Equipment Tour title and earned him the champion’s trophy spurs as he edged Ty Taypotat by just five points.

Bull rider Brock Radford was the only other competitor who overcame a deficit to win the SMS Equipment Tour title. The DeWinton, AB, hand was aided by his fourth-place result in the tour final en route to the overall championship.

Steer wrestling champion, Scott Guenthner.

Those able to protect the leads they enjoyed going into the Armstrong weekend included steer wrestling champion Scott Guenthner, tie-down roper Beau Cooper, bronc rider Lachlan Miller, barrel racer Bayleigh Choate, team ropers Tristin Woolsey and Trey Gallais and breakaway roper Lakota Bird. 

Guenthner, the two-time Canadian Steer Wrestling Champion and 2022 season leader, also put up a pair of wins, topping the field at Merritt with a 4.1 second performance for $1,999, then smoking a 3.1 second run in the SMS Equipment Pro Rodeo Tour finals for $2,320 to clinch his tour title.

Bull rider, Coy Robbins, enjoyed a productive and lucrative weekend as he captured the title at the first-ever Valley West Stampede in Langley, British Columbia riding Duane Kesler Championship Rodeo’s 675 Circus Freak for 88.5 points and $5,773. Robbins then added an 87-point win at the Nicola Valley Pro Rodeo (Merritt, BC,) on Macza Rodeo’s 803 Blue Bombshell for another $1,908. The Camrose, AB, athlete capped off the weekend with an 87.5, third place finish in the SMS Pro Tour Final for an additional $1,160. After a weekend that provided major moves in the Canadian standings, Robbins is a virtual lock for the CFR as his wins will move him past Jordan Hansen into third place.

The Graham brothers, Dillon and Dawson, continued their winning ways, running their steak to five in a row with wins at Merritt (4.3, $2,216) and Armstrong (5.0, $2,832). The Wainwright cowboys came up just short in their effort to capture the SMS Equipment Tour title as the duo of Trey Gallais and Tristin Woolsey prevailed for the SMS Equipment crown.

One of the biggest moves in the CFR race was that of barrel racer Jennifer Neudorf. Entering the weekend in a precarious 11th place in the standings, a win at Langley (15.42, $5,922) and a 6/7 spilt for another $998 at Armstrong will push the Grande Prairie cowgirl solidly into the top ten with just three weeks remaining in the regular season.

With every dollar won critical as the 2022 season winds down, CPRA competitors will now take their talents to the Coronation Pro Rodeo, September 9-10 and the Medicine Lodge Fall Roundup September 10.

For complete (unofficial) results, check out prorodeocanada.com

How to Bet on a Racehorse

A day at the races can be fun – and maybe even profitable – if you know what you’re doing when it comes to placing bets.

By Jenn Webster

Have you ever wanted to place a bet on a racehorse, but became overwhelmed by the thought of it? Wagering at the track, when done in moderation, can be a fun way to spend an afternoon. In honor of the Kentucky Derby today, we have compiled an easy guide to placing bets on racehorses. There’s no bigger thrill than watching the powerful equine you bet on, cross the finish line first!

Thoroughbred racing is the oldest form of organized racing in the world but in North America usually means the horses are flat racing on a dirt or turf surface. Race lengths can vary. In Canada, Thoroughbred racing is seasonal so it’s normal to see many short races at the beginning of the season when many of the horses are not yet conditioned for longer races. Younger animals too, usually run shorter races, taking into consideration the horse’s rate of growth and inexperience. However, some horses (all ages) run consistently better at short distances and these statistics are all recorded – something seasoned bettors note! Depending on the length of the race, Thoroughbreds may run straight sprints or on larger tracks that require them to go around turns.

Quarter Horse (QH) racing is much like Thoroughbred racing, however the race distances are much shorter. There are several different lengths available for these horses, ranging from one furlong (220 yards), to four furlongs (870 yards). Most QH races are straight sprints, which means they must be able to break well from the starting gate.

Standardbred racing is harness racing – the horse pulls a light cart or “sulky” and is driven, as opposed to being ridden. Standardbred horses are either pacers or trotters.

BETTING

1 – Decide how much money you are willing to bet. The minimum bet is $2, but you can always bet more if you like.

2 – Pick your horse. People pick their horses in a variety of ways. You may like its name, colour, number, jockey or colour of its silks. Many advanced bettors choose their horses based on past performance, the trainer’s reputation or the jockey’s records. Other considerations they might keep top of mind is the type of track, the weather, bloodlines of the horse, or the size and shape of the track. And here’s a pro tip! If you’re ever observing the racers in the paddock prior to a race, the horse that is jumping, rearing or displaying a lot of extra activity is not usually the one you want to bet on – the horse that is calm, cool and collected in the paddock is the one conserving its energy for the race.

Race programs too, give you the information on every horse and every race for the day and they are usually available for a small fee. They can be helpful in picking a horse.

3 – Choose your Bet. Straight wagers are the best type of bets for visitors completely new to the world of racing. When you making this type of bet, you are only betting on one horse.

WIN – This means you are betting on a specific horse, to come in first place.
PLACE – Your horse must finish first or second.
SHOW – Your horse must finish first, second or third.

Odds are something else you’ll want to look consider. These are the numbers appearing beside the horse’s number (displayed in numerous places around the track, in the program, etc.) The more a horse is liked by bettors, the lower its odds are and the lower the pay-out will be. The underdog horses have higher odds and consequently, a higher payout.

4Master More Advanced Bets. Once you are comfortable with how win, place and show works in a basic bet, you may want to move on to a more exotic wager. Here is some terminology you should know:

EXACTA – You bet on two horses to come in first and second, in an exact order.
QUINELLA – You bet on two horses to come in first and second in any order.
TRIFECTA – You bet that three horses will finish in first, second, and third in an exact order.
SUPERFECTA – You bet that four horses will finish, first, second, third, and fourth in an exact order.

Many racetracks like Century Downs in Balzac, AB, even offer Betting 101 classes for free. You can join them and learn about placing exotic bets, multi-race wagers, Jackpot High-5 or Century Down’s own unique wager. Their experts can walk you through the betting basics so placing your first bet isn’t so daunting. Have fun and enjoy yourself!

How the West was Worn

Blue jeans, automobiles, brightly-colored dishes and even dental bling all have one thing in common – they’ve all been influenced by western design. Discover how the history and craftsmanship of the West influenced goods and culture through the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s newest exhibition, Western Wares, that opened February 11, 2022. The museum is based in Oklahoma City, OK.
 
Western design is a term familiar to a global audience, drumming up images of pearl-snap shirts, rhinestones, and cowboy hats. Visitors will learn that western design has been crafted over time by different people and traditions. It is a continually evolving style that is both connected to the geography of the west, but also defined by each person who wears it. 


“Here at The Cowboy, we know that the history and legends of the West have influenced many aspects of American culture deeply,” said Natalie Shirley, Museum President and CEO. “This exhibition is a fun way to see the impact that cowboy and. western culture has had on the world of design.”
 
Western Wares will take museum visitors through the history behind the rise in popularity of the western aesthetic, from the 1890s, to its historic peak in the mid-twentieth century and then on to present day.


 Upon entering the exhibition space, museum visitors will first experience the early influences of design that stemmed from Indigenous, Hispanic and European cultures and were used on the range starting in the 1800s. The exhibition will then explore varied interpretations of western design by rodeo performers, musicians, vintage enthusiasts, and people looking to reclaim their cultural traditions. It will also feature a space that delves into the mechanical processes of making a look, including sewing, leather working, silversmithing and design. 
 
Much of the western fashion presented in the exhibition will come from the museum’s extensive collections. The exhibition will also feature many never-before seen photographs. Western Wares will be on exhibit through May 1, 2022.

Fireside Trout

This beautiful trout recipe is so easy to cook and a wonderful way to enjoy the outdoors. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography

By Chef Mike Edgar

This Rainbow Trout dish is best enjoyed next to the fire with your favourite people and a setting sun. Fireside Trout Pouches go amazingly well with Fennel Roast Baby Potatoes and Bannock on a Stick. Make these recipes over the campfire on your next trail ride and it’s a trip no one will forget!

Trout Pouches
 
INGREDIENTS:
6 Whole, Deboned Rainbow Trout (Roughly, two pounds each)
1 Package Fresh Cherry Tomatoes
250 Grams Whole Olives
1/2 Pound Sliced Butter
4 Lemons Sliced
Fresh Basil
Fresh Parsley
Salt 
Pepper
6 Large Sheets Tinfoil
18 Slices Sliced Pancetta
2 Bulbs Fresh Fennel
2 Pounds Baby Potatoes
24 Fresh Clams
 
Pancetta Method:
In a cast iron, pan fry the pancetta until crispy. Set aside for garnish.

These roasted fennel baby potatoes are a delicious and hearty side-dish, cooked easily over a grill. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

Fennel Roast Baby Potatoes Method:
Cut potatoes in half and boil in water for five minutes to soften them up. Remove from water and set aside. Slice your fennel as thin as you can and sauté over medium heat in butter or oil in a cast iron pan. When the fennel starts to caramelize, add the potatoes and another tablespoon of butter or oil, cover and continue to cook. Stir often until potatoes are nicely roasted and fennel is sweet and crunchy – approximately 20 minutes. Wrap in a tinfoil pouch and set aside to reheat.
 
Trout Method:
To begin, cut your sheets of tinfoil to make your pouches. Place lemon slices and fresh torn herbs down first. Season the trout inside and out with salt and pepper, stuff with some herbs and some lemon slices. Place two to three slices of butter over the trout. Add four tomatoes, four olives and four clams.

Fold the tinfoil around everything to make a sealed pouch. Ensure there are no leaks and is everything is sealed, (you can always wrap a second tinfoil sheet around if need be.) Place your pouches either next to the fire as close to the heat as possible, or over the fire on a grill. Depending on the heat of your fire, the trout should take no more than 20 minutes to cook. Flip the pouches every five minutes. Make sure you put your pouch of fennel potatoes on the fire as well to heat up again!
 
Open your pouches. If you feel that your fish needs more time, just wrap it back up and put back on the heat. Discard any clams that have not opened. Top your trout with chopped parsley and basil, the crispy pancetta and a drizzle of olive oil. Place your potatoes around the trout and dig in.

Bannock on a stick is a great recipe to enjoy with kids! Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

Bannock on a Stick
 
INGREDIENTS:
1 Cup Flour
1 Tsp. Baking Powder
1/4 Tsp. Salt
2 Tbsp. Powdered Milk
1 Tbsp. Melted Butter
 
Once you have combined all the above ingredients and created your dough, take the dough and role into a long thin shape. Start wrapping the dough around a carefully chosen stick, (an ideal stick is one that would work for cooking hot dogs or marshmallows over a fire.) As you wrap, spiral the dough down down the stick and compress and spread it, so the dough is half-an-inch thick.
 
The inside of the dough needs to cook before the outside over-cooks. Therefore, you need to find the perfect distance from the fire. The best way to do this is to find a spot where you can hold your hand over the fire for 15 to 20 seconds.
 
Once you have found the perfect cooking spot, hold the bannock in place, rotating so all sides cook evenly. This should take 10 minutes. The dough should easily come off the stick when cooked. If it sticks, the dough is not cooked.
 
Serve with warm butter and jam of your choice.

Wojabi
 
Wojabi is an American Indian Berry sauce. You can use any mix of berries you like. For this recipe, w used Saskatoon berries and blueberries.
 
2 1/2 Cups of each Berry
1/2 Cup Water
1/2 Cup Honey
 
After washing your fruit, place all ingredients into a pot and mash with a fork or potato masher. Bring the mixture to a boil. Stir and reduce heat to a low simmer. Cook for an hour stirring occasionally so nothing burns. Let cool and enjoy! 

For some expert trail riding advice, check WHR’s recent article here. Photo by Monique Noble.

A Riding Safari

Provided by www.ridinginafrica.com

BY INGRID SCHULZ

It’s hard to beat life in the West. Ours, after all is an unparalleled view – one of greatness and freedom, fiery blue skies, magnificent mountains and earthy plains. In our rein hands lie the exhilaration of a run down the fence, the adrenaline rush from the back of a cutting horse, or a barrel equine, or almost any rodeo animal, while out of the competitive arena and out on the range, in the mountains, the prairie – our vista of a view, wide and endless – is unequalled in the world.

Except, perhaps . . . in South Africa.

The Triple B Ranch, near Waterberg, South Africa was settled by the pioneering Baber family over a century ago, and today, several outfits offer adventure-based horseback safaris into the grounds of the 20,000 acre ranch. Horizon Horseback is one such company. Established in 1993, it is based in the malaria-free Waterberg Biosphere Reserve in northern South Africa, an unspoiled part of the country with varied topography, from bushveld savannah, to rocky outcrops and mountains. Over the years they have developed a collection of horse riding safaris which offer not only close encounters with game, but also a diverse range of other rewarding riding experiences: polocrosse, western games, jumping, cattle mustering (Africa-speak for round-ups) and swimming with your horse.

Provided by www.ridinginafrica.com

Loping across the grasslands of a 100-year-old cattle ranch in South Africa, with herds of giraffe and wildebeest in your peripheral is a pretty decent equal to our Wild West. Weave in evenings with the endless song of the cicada, the smells of the land permeating your tent, and just outside of the canvas walls of your luxury tent – the stars running over the sky, and impetuously the idea of falling in love with another land becomes a plausibility. For Africa is a special land. And, seeing it by horseback could be nothing less than magical.

Safaris in Africa are an intimate experience: there is simply no better way of taking in the African bush, than by horseback. Becoming part of a herd of zebra as they canter across the plains, or quietly approaching a browsing giraffe or basking hippo is a truly amazing feeling. Perhaps it is just as author and African coffee plantation owner, Karen Blixen wrote in her love story, Out of Africa: “You know you are truly alive when you are living among lions.”

Provided by www.ridinginafrica.com
Provided by www.ridinginafrica.com

Sample Eight-Day Itinerary

Day One: land at Johannesburg International and transfer to Camp Davidson. Meet your safari horse. Day Two: ride out to track herds of giraffe, zebra, eland, wildebeest, kudu and impala. Day Three: visit the historic Baber homestead for a poolside lunch, followed by a culture tour with a trip into the local village. Finish off with dinner under the stars back at camp. Day Four: a big-five (rhino, lion, elephant, buffalo and leopard) game day with afternoon craft workshop visit back at the Triple B. Day Five: a last ride through the reserve soaking up the sights and the sounds of the African bush at sunrise. Day Six: Now in the Tuli block, renowned for its large herds of elephant, as well as antelope, zebra, fox, jackal, hyena and the big cats. Later ride along the Limpopo River. Day Seven: The option of a game day drive, more riding in the reserve, or a visit to a local village to mesh with the locals. Day Eight: after a last morning ride, a quick breakfast and drive back to Johannesburg.

Cost: $323.00 per person per night based dependent on current exchange rate. Land transfers extra and flights to South Africa not included.

Provided by www.ridinginafrica.com

BIO – Thank-you to Patricia Blanchard for providing us with the research and details for this trip. Blanchard is an independent advisor with Travel Professionals International. She moved to Calgary in 1993 from Newfoundland and has always had a passion for travel and helping others. She made the leap to being a travel agent and is now doing travel full-time from Chestermere, AB. Blanchard has contended in both reining and western pleasure since moving to Alberta but now has just one retired horse. She loves to ride her Harley and travels at any opportunity. For more info please visit: tpi.ca/PatriciaBlanchardTPI/

Provided by www.ridinginafrica.com

Jurassic Adventure

Discover fossils at the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre and meet the world’s largest (Guinness Record-holding) mosasaur “Bruce,” in Morden, Manitoba.

If you’re wondering what the connection is between horses and fossils, the answer will delight Jurassic Park (and World!) fans across the board. Did you know that many different horse sounds were used in the making of the original Jurassic Park movie? For instance, in the original movie (which is now one of 5 box-office hits) introduced us to intelligence of the Velociraptor. Do you remember the part when the Raptor appeared in the door of the kitchen, breathing terrifyingly on the glass window in pursuit of the two kids? The breathing noise was the recorded sounds of a horse.

And that wasn’t the only usage of Equid sounds in the movie.

The Gallimimus flock sounds like a stampede of wild horses. The squeal the Gallimimuses make when they’re passing by the actors who marvel at their likeness to a “flock of birds, evading a predator,” are actually a recorded mare in heat. Same goes for the squeal the ill-fated one at the end of the sequence makes when it’s attacked by a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

The brachiosaur’s singing is made from the unique sound a donkey, slowed down into a “song-like” sound. And in case you were wondering about the Triceratops
 – a lot of cow noises were used to animate that species in the movie.

So for all you Jurassic World fans – did you know that we have the largest Guinness World Record-holding Mosasaur in Morden, Manitoba? He even has a name! In 1974 “Bruce” was discovered north of Thornhill within the Pembina Member of the Pierre Shale Formation. Bruce lived during the late Cretaceous period, approximately 80 million years ago. He swam in a deep sea environment with numerous other marine reptiles. It took approximately two field seasons to excavate the skeleton, which was reasonably complete with 65-70% of the original bones.

Aaaaaand we have Bruce featured in the July/August issue of Western Horse Review, as part of our #HaveHorsesWillTravel feature! If you’re headed to the Manitoba Stampede & Exhibition this July 19-22, the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre (which features Bruce, Suzy and a rare new mosasaur skeleton coming July 25!) is only roughly 74 kms away.

The incredible new mosasaur skeleton coming to the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre (CFDC) is of a rare species known as Kourisodon puntledgensis, or razor-toothed mosasaur of the Puntledge River. It’s a unique species whose fossils have only been found in Canada and Japan. The new addition further establishes the CFDC as one of the world’s foremost collections of mosasaur.

“This addition has been a long time in the planning stages and we are very excited to see it finally come to fruition,” said CFDC executive director Peter Cantelon. “People will notice right away this is a very different mosasaur from Bruce and Suzy – particularly its ferocious, razor-like teeth.”

 

National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s Cowboy Crossings® Opening Weekend generates nearly $1 million in sales

Submitted by the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association

Intricate spur straps created by craftsman, Chuck Stormes. Photo Credit: TCAA.


OKLAHOMA CITY
 – Cowboy Crossings, one of the nation’s foremost annual Western art sales and exhibitions, is now open to the public at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. During Opening Weekend, Oct. 5 – 7, gross sales exceeded $986,310 with a portion of those proceeds benefiting the Museum’s educational programs.
The event and exhibition offers a unique combination of more than 150 pieces of art represented in different mediums featuring the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA) 52nd Annual Sale & Exhibition as well as the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA) 19th Annual Exhibition & Sale.

“We are pleased by the tremendous support for Western art from across the country,” said Chief Financial Officer and Interim President and CEO Gary Moore. “The combination of working art such as saddles, bits and spurs, and rawhide braiding, along with the fine art of painting and sculpture, helps many individuals connect with the West in ways they might not have previously considered.”

Shot glasses crafted by local artist, Scott Hardy, took home top honours. Photo Credit: TCAA.

Clifton, Texas, CAA artist Martin Grelle’s piece, Expectations, was the show’s highest selling piece at $54,000. The highest selling TCAA piece was a sterling silver shot glass set and tray by artist Scott Hardy of Longview, Alberta, Canada, selling for $31,000.   
The CAA exhibition is available through Nov. 26, 2017, and TCAA will be on display through Jan. 7, 2018. Unsold art is available for purchase through The Museum Store at (405) 478-2250 ext. 228. For more information, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/cowboy-crossings. For award-winning art associated with this release, click here.

A full list of winners from the weekend’s awards show is as follows:

  • The CAA Stetson Award recipient, selected by active CAA members as the best compilation of individual works, was Paul Moore of Norman, Oklahoma, for his six bronze sculptures: Old Man Losing His Heron, When His Heart is Down, Tug of War, Blessing at Wuwuchim, Hopi Two Horned Priest, and Young San Felipe Green Corn Dancer. 
  • The Anne Marion Best of Show Award, chosen by anonymous artist judges from the four gold medal winners, was given to Grant Redden of Evanston, Wyoming, for his painting, Feeding the Flock.
  • Jason Scull of Kerrville, Texas, earned the Ray Swanson Memorial Award for his bronze relief, Waitin’ for Daylight. The award is given for a work of art that best communicates a moment in time, capturing emotion.
  • Grant Redden received the Oil Painting Gold Medal Award for his painting, Feeding the Flock.
  • Martin Grelle of Clifton, Texas, received the Oil Painting Silver Medal Award for his painting, Expectations.
  • Whirling Wind on the Plains, a Texas limestone sculpture by Oreland C. Joe Sr. (Navajo/Ute), of Kirtland, New Mexico, was the Sculpture Gold Medal Award winner.
  • When His Heart is Down, a bronze sculpture by Paul Moore of Norman, Oklahoma, was the Sculpture Silver Medal Award winner.
  • Phil Epp of Newton, Kansas, received the Water Soluble Gold Medal Award for his painting, Hilltop.
  • Mikel Donahue of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, received the Water Soluble Silver Medal Award for his painting, The Bronc Stomper.
  • C. Michael Dudash of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, received the Drawing and Other Media Gold Medal Award for his charcoal and chalk drawing, Cowgirl.
  • Tyler Crow of Hico, Texas, received the Drawing and Other Media Silver Medal Award for his charcoal drawing, Cow Camp Studio.
  • The Buyers’ Choice Award, selected by show attendants, was awarded to Tyler Crow for his charcoal drawing, Cow Camp Studio.

    Artist, Tyler Crow. Made in America, Oil, 32” x 26” Photo Credit: TCAA.

The TCAA’s do not confer awards for their pieces in the Cowboy Crossings exhibition, instead choosing to offer cash scholarships to a select number of up-and-coming traditional artists. This year’s fellowship winners are:

  • TCAA Fellowship for Cowboy Craftsmen recipients are Troy Flayharty and Graeme Quisenberry.
  • Mike Eslick received the Emerging Artist Award.

    Saddle with Tapaderos by craftsman, John Willemsma. Photo Credit: TCAA.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
Nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is located only six miles northeast of downtown Oklahoma City in the Adventure District at the junction of Interstates 44 and 35, the state’s exciting Adventure Road corridor. The Museum offers annual memberships beginning at just $40. For more information, visitnationalcowboymuseum.org. For high-resolution images related to the National Cowboy Museum, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/media-pics/.

Premiere Western Art Show at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum will host Cowboy Crossings, one of North America’s foremost annual Western art sales and exhibitions, opening to the public this October 7, 2017 in Oklahoma City, OK. The event and exhibition offers a unique combination of more than 150 pieces of art represented in different mediums featuring the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA) 52nd Annual Sale & Exhibition, as well as the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA) 19th Annual Exhibition & Sale.

Reaching for the Bronc Rein, Oil, 45” x 46”, by Jason Rich.

“The quality and diversity of perspectives showcased in Cowboy Crossings is indicative of how vast and relevant the West is to everyone today,” said Chief Financial Officer and Interim President and CEO Gary Moore. “Western art is at the foundation of the National Cowboy Museum’s mission, and the combination of art styles represented in this show, such as saddles and spurs along with paintings and sculptures, enables everyone to identify with a part of the West.”

Lakota Daydreams, Oil, 34 x 34”, by R.S. Riddick.

The CAA’s mission is to authentically preserve and perpetuate the culture of Western life in fine art. Representing some of the most highly regarded cowboy artists of today, the CAA’s goals include ensuring authentic representations of the West, “as it was and is,” and maintaining standards of quality in contemporary Western art and helping guide collectors.

TCAA Santa Susanna Bit, by Wilson-Capron.

The TCAA is dedicated to preserving and promoting the skills of saddlemaking, bit and spur making, silversmithing, and rawhide braiding and the role of these traditional crafts in the cowboy culture of the North American West. With a focus on education, this organization aims to help the public understand and appreciate the level of quality available today and the value of fine craftsmanship.

Hilltop, Acrylic, 60” x 60”, by Phil Epp.

CAA will be on display through Nov. 26, 2017, and TCAA will be on display through Jan. 7, 2018. For more information, a full list of Opening Weekend activities, or to purchase tickets, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/cowboy-crossings or call (405) 478-2250 ext. 218.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum – Nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is located only six miles northeast of downtown Oklahoma City in the Adventure District at the junction of Interstates 44 and 35, the state’s exciting Adventure Road corridor. For more information, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org.

Polo, This Weekend

Photo by have-dog.com

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If you’re looking for an exceptional experience this weekend, why not come out to the Calgary Polo Club this Saturday August 12, to watch the Canadian Open – Smithbilt Hat Day at 2:00 pm? Featuring the Canadian Open Match Game (12 Goal), fans can watch Highwood vs. Château D’ESCLANS.

This weekend will also showcase their regular 4-goal games on Sunday, at 12 and 2pm.

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The combination of speed, control and horsepower in polo is intoxicating. If you’re looking for some great family fun on the sidelines, or longing to renew your passion for equestrian sport, the Calgary Polo Club (CPC) is the perfect place for all levels of enthusiasm.

It’s interesting to note that some of Calgary, Alberta’s best polo players originally came from the discipline of team penning. People from a medley of other events find themselves enamoured with the sport, the first time they crush the ball down the field.

Photos by Callaghan Creative Co.

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Polo culture involves tailgate picnics. Bring some chairs, a basket of delicatessens, a charcuterie board and cold beverages and your gathering of friends will think you picnic like an event-planner.

Social members can take in all the field-side exhilaration with the option to reserve white tents to block out the warmth of the sun on hot days. White VIP tents with designer leather furniture can additionally be reserved for a fee to make it a Sunday Funday like no other.

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

Photo by have-dog.com

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The sport of kings is dependent on the grace of equines. Men, women and children can all enjoy the game of polo, because the horse is an extraordinary equalizer.

There a few things you may want to know, before you go. The rules of the game are based on the right of way of players and the “line of the ball,” created each time the ball is hit. Once the ball is struck by a player an imaginary line is formed, creating the right of way for that player. No other player may cross the line in front, as doing so results in dangerous play. Crossing the line in front of speeding horses at right angles, is the most common foul in polo.

THROW IN: Umpires start the game by throwing the ball between the two teams that are lined up on different sides.

KNOCK IN: The defending team is allowed a free ‘knock-in’ from the place where the ball crossed the goal line if the ball goes wide of the goal, thus getting ball back into play.

RIDE OFF: Involves safely pushing one’s horse into the side of the opponent’s mount to take him or her off the line. Contact must be made at a 45-degree angle or less and only between the horse’s hips and shoulders.

HOOKING: This is the action of blocking another player’s shot by hooking or blocking his or her mallet.

OFF-SIDE: The right side of the horse.

NEAR-SIDE: The left side of the horse.

Horses in play have their tails braided and manes shaved to avoid the hazard of becoming entangled in a players’ mallets and/or reins. White pants worn by riders is a tradition that can be traced back to the 19th century in Britain and India, where the game was played by royalty only and in very hot temperatures. Hence, the preference for fabrics that were light in colour and weight. The shaft of a polo mallet is akin to the soul of a good horse; strong, resilient and adaptable. Polo mallets have magnificent flexibility and strength.

Lastly, spectators are encouraged to back their vehicles up to field, all the while maintaining a safe, 20-foot distance from the sideboards. At times, players may send their horses over the boards in pursuit of the ball – and you don’t want to be in their way.

 

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

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No matter the type of hat you wear, there is a level of polo participation for everyone. Perhaps Western Horse Review will see you out there! For more information on tournaments and events at the Calgary Polo Club visit: www.calgarypoloclub.com.

*Make-Up credit to The Aria Studios, Hair by Meagan Peters, Outfits by Cody & Sioux.