Premiere Western Art Show at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum will host Cowboy Crossings, one of North America’s foremost annual Western art sales and exhibitions, opening to the public this October 7, 2017 in Oklahoma City, OK. The event and exhibition offers a unique combination of more than 150 pieces of art represented in different mediums featuring the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA) 52nd Annual Sale & Exhibition, as well as the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA) 19th Annual Exhibition & Sale.

Reaching for the Bronc Rein, Oil, 45” x 46”, by Jason Rich.

“The quality and diversity of perspectives showcased in Cowboy Crossings is indicative of how vast and relevant the West is to everyone today,” said Chief Financial Officer and Interim President and CEO Gary Moore. “Western art is at the foundation of the National Cowboy Museum’s mission, and the combination of art styles represented in this show, such as saddles and spurs along with paintings and sculptures, enables everyone to identify with a part of the West.”

Lakota Daydreams, Oil, 34 x 34”, by R.S. Riddick.

The CAA’s mission is to authentically preserve and perpetuate the culture of Western life in fine art. Representing some of the most highly regarded cowboy artists of today, the CAA’s goals include ensuring authentic representations of the West, “as it was and is,” and maintaining standards of quality in contemporary Western art and helping guide collectors.

TCAA Santa Susanna Bit, by Wilson-Capron.

The TCAA is dedicated to preserving and promoting the skills of saddlemaking, bit and spur making, silversmithing, and rawhide braiding and the role of these traditional crafts in the cowboy culture of the North American West. With a focus on education, this organization aims to help the public understand and appreciate the level of quality available today and the value of fine craftsmanship.

Hilltop, Acrylic, 60” x 60”, by Phil Epp.

CAA will be on display through Nov. 26, 2017, and TCAA will be on display through Jan. 7, 2018. For more information, a full list of Opening Weekend activities, or to purchase tickets, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org/cowboy-crossings or call (405) 478-2250 ext. 218.

About the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum – Nationally accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is located only six miles northeast of downtown Oklahoma City in the Adventure District at the junction of Interstates 44 and 35, the state’s exciting Adventure Road corridor. For more information, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org.

Paige 1912 – The Wild West Fashion Show


Silhouetted against the “big smoke” of Calgary, AB at the modern-west venue of Hotel Arts, the complete fall line for Paige 1912 was unveiled to attendants under the moniker, ‘1912 – The Wild West Fashion Show’. Paige Callaway, of Millarville AB, is the creator behind Paige 1912, as well as Pursue Victory, a line of shirts developed for functionality and fit. For the former trick-rider, It was her love for the wild west – the days of box cars, rambling cowboys and wild women – that brought forth the inspiration for her newest line.

Callaway says, “Paige 1912 takes what we know, the fit and functionality of the classic shirt and ads a fashion forward ‘wild west meets high fashion’ look. However, since creativity can be like a run away horse, it isn’t limited to the new styles of shirts. This line includes accessories that compliment the shirts and the brand.”

Unique designs and patterns at The Paige 1912 fashion show. Images:@TheBrandPaige1912/@PursueVictory

 

The designs and patterns at the show were certainly unique. Bold patterns were seen on the runway in the form of polka dots, bright colours and florals. While couture accruements like delicately placed cuff ruffles, or the fan-favourite front-facing ruffles, as seen above, were complimented by authentic turquoise pieces and Kimes Ranch denim. Models wore silk scarves in their hair, or paired their outfits with felt hats while they walked in Alberta Boots. The runway was also host to accomplished trick ropers and live music, including Brandi Phillips, who has had the honour of performing her rope tricks to the Queen of England, among others. Matt Robertson, a cowboy musician, serenaded the crowd with a song that harkened back to the old west.

Cowboy singer, Matt Robertson, serenades the crowd at the Paige 1912 fashion show.

At the pre and post-show reception, guests were invited to shop Paige 1912 t-shirts, as well as the line of felt hats seen on the runway that Callaway designed and are available at Smithbilt Hats. An authentic turquoise collection was also for sale which included squash blossoms, cuffs, bracelets, necklaces and rings. Callaway says, “Pursue Victory started as the melding of two significant areas of my life, the rodeo/equine world and my education as a couturier. Paige 1912 is an addition that that, melding my love for high fashion and the wild west.”

The Paige 1912 is certainly unique and bold, designs that are eye-popping and show stopping that deliver something different than the average button-up. Callaway is currently in the process of solidifying which stores will be carrying the fall line, and will be announcing the details shortly via her website: www.paige1912.com.

Details from Paige 1912. Images:@TheBrandPaige1912/@PursueVictory

Polo, This Weekend

Photo by have-dog.com

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If you’re looking for an exceptional experience this weekend, why not come out to the Calgary Polo Club this Saturday August 12, to watch the Canadian Open – Smithbilt Hat Day at 2:00 pm? Featuring the Canadian Open Match Game (12 Goal), fans can watch Highwood vs. Château D’ESCLANS.

This weekend will also showcase their regular 4-goal games on Sunday, at 12 and 2pm.

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The combination of speed, control and horsepower in polo is intoxicating. If you’re looking for some great family fun on the sidelines, or longing to renew your passion for equestrian sport, the Calgary Polo Club (CPC) is the perfect place for all levels of enthusiasm.

It’s interesting to note that some of Calgary, Alberta’s best polo players originally came from the discipline of team penning. People from a medley of other events find themselves enamoured with the sport, the first time they crush the ball down the field.

Photos by Callaghan Creative Co.

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Polo culture involves tailgate picnics. Bring some chairs, a basket of delicatessens, a charcuterie board and cold beverages and your gathering of friends will think you picnic like an event-planner.

Social members can take in all the field-side exhilaration with the option to reserve white tents to block out the warmth of the sun on hot days. White VIP tents with designer leather furniture can additionally be reserved for a fee to make it a Sunday Funday like no other.

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

Photo by have-dog.com

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The sport of kings is dependent on the grace of equines. Men, women and children can all enjoy the game of polo, because the horse is an extraordinary equalizer.

There a few things you may want to know, before you go. The rules of the game are based on the right of way of players and the “line of the ball,” created each time the ball is hit. Once the ball is struck by a player an imaginary line is formed, creating the right of way for that player. No other player may cross the line in front, as doing so results in dangerous play. Crossing the line in front of speeding horses at right angles, is the most common foul in polo.

THROW IN: Umpires start the game by throwing the ball between the two teams that are lined up on different sides.

KNOCK IN: The defending team is allowed a free ‘knock-in’ from the place where the ball crossed the goal line if the ball goes wide of the goal, thus getting ball back into play.

RIDE OFF: Involves safely pushing one’s horse into the side of the opponent’s mount to take him or her off the line. Contact must be made at a 45-degree angle or less and only between the horse’s hips and shoulders.

HOOKING: This is the action of blocking another player’s shot by hooking or blocking his or her mallet.

OFF-SIDE: The right side of the horse.

NEAR-SIDE: The left side of the horse.

Horses in play have their tails braided and manes shaved to avoid the hazard of becoming entangled in a players’ mallets and/or reins. White pants worn by riders is a tradition that can be traced back to the 19th century in Britain and India, where the game was played by royalty only and in very hot temperatures. Hence, the preference for fabrics that were light in colour and weight. The shaft of a polo mallet is akin to the soul of a good horse; strong, resilient and adaptable. Polo mallets have magnificent flexibility and strength.

Lastly, spectators are encouraged to back their vehicles up to field, all the while maintaining a safe, 20-foot distance from the sideboards. At times, players may send their horses over the boards in pursuit of the ball – and you don’t want to be in their way.

 

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

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No matter the type of hat you wear, there is a level of polo participation for everyone. Perhaps Western Horse Review will see you out there! For more information on tournaments and events at the Calgary Polo Club visit: www.calgarypoloclub.com.

*Make-Up credit to The Aria Studios, Hair by Meagan Peters, Outfits by Cody & Sioux.

 

 

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Meet CS Princess Brittany

Calgary Stampede Princess, Brittany Lloyd, in Berlin.


The Calgary Stampede has come and gone, and a new trio will soon be crowned. Western Horse Review sat down with Brittany Lloyd, one of this year’s Calgary Stampede Princesses about her experiences, her beloved Stampede horse, Snoopy, and much more about her exciting life experience as Stampede royalty.

1. What were your favourite parts of the 2017 Calgary Stampede?

Wow! I can’t believe the Calgary Stampede has come and gone. Over the ten days we had the opportunity to attend Paul Brandt’s #NotInMyCity event (thank you, Sal Howell!), visited many of the infield suites and scored a seriously good view for the Alabama concert. But amidst all the madness during the Calgary Stampede, I absolutely loved hopping on my horse, Snoopy, for Grand Entries. I will always remember that quiet moment walking up the alley way towards the arena knowing we would soon be greeted by friends, family and rodeo fans from all over the world!

2. What have been some of your most memorable experiences, since your reign as Princess began, to date?

There are many highlights from the year including the Calgary Stampede, National Finals Rodeo, Canadian Finals Rodeo, Grey Cup and International Tourism Conference in Berlin; one of my favorites, however, was Aggie Days. This is a convention rodeo that is closed to the public, but open to schools in Calgary and the surrounding area for grades three through five to give students the opportunity to learn about rodeo and agriculture sustainability – two things I am very passionate about! I absolutely love doing things in our hometown because there is an overwhelming sense of community spirit and pride. It was our first grand entry and first time I really felt a part of the horse and livestock community at the Calgary Stampede. The children at Aggie Days had the most unbridled enthusiasm for meeting competitors and royalty, which will be an experience I will cherish forever.

The 2017 Calgary Stampede Royalty

 

3. Can you please tell us about your experience applying to become part of the trio? How did you feel the night you became a princess?

I still find it a little surreal! For me, the Calgary Stampede always came before the title “Princess”. As a born and raised Calgarian, it has been a lifelong dream of mine to be a part of the Calgary Stampede organization. The Calgary Stampede to me represents so many key elements – celebration of community, celebration of history, spirited competition, pride in our heritage and true hospitality at its best. What I identify most with about the Calgary Stampede, is what is at the heart of this 10-day exhibition; the animals. Having the privilege to see the wild horses of the Calgary Stampede at the Stampede Ranch, I sincerely believe these animals are integral to Alberta’s history and future. I am so proud of the the Born to Buck breeding program and the Calgary Stampede’s commitment to excellence.

4. How has this experience changed your life?

This past year, I have had to the opportunity to turn strangers into neighbors by helping host people from around the world during the Calgary Stampede, and I have never been more proud to call this city home. Cowboys and cowgirls have defined Calgary’s values, influenced how we do business and inspired generations to come. It has been an incredible opportunity to help foster these traditions and help tell the great story of the Calgary Stampede to the world. While my year as a Princess may be coming to an end, I hope to stay involved in the Stampede in another capacity.

Princess Brittany, with her “Prince”, Snoopy.

5. Can you please tell us about your Royal horse?

I am so grateful to share this experience with the palomino gelding Snoopy. Prior to being owned by the Royalty Program, he was a movie horse and certainly likes to be the star of the show! He can get a little hot, particularly at the end of “Oh Canada” during grand entries, but he is one of the safest, kindest horses I’ve ever ridden. I come from an english riding background, and he has been the perfect horse to transition me from jumper to cowgirl (with a little help from Eamor’s Saddlery and Clay Webster.) I know he will make the next Princess as happy as he has made me!

A future Princess Brittany at the Calgary Stampede

6. What’s a typical day in your life as Princess look like currently?

Aside from the 10 days of Stampede, there is no “typical day” for a Princess! Our schedules are constantly changing and each event brings something new, unexpected and exciting. We attend all types of things from school visits, to rodeos, Calgary Tourism events and charity functions. What makes this program so unique is that we are truly ambassadors for Calgary’s community spirit, our western heritage and cultural values – with a touch of rodeo on the side! I feel most honored to be included in charity events such as the Calgary Stampede Foundation fundraisers, visiting the Ronald McDonald house and having the opportunity to meet people touched and inspired by the Calgary Stampede.

7. Can you please tell us about some of your best beauty tips/secrets?

Before becoming a Princess, I wasn’t very glamorous, so this year has been full of learning in terms of hair and makeup. I think my best tip would be to start with your skin! I’m very disciplined about taking my makeup off before bed and washing my face in the morning. I also think being healthy is so beautiful so I try to stay fit, eat healthy and drink lots of water. My biggest beauty indulgence is eyelash extensions. Leigh Glover of Luv Leigh Lashes does an amazing job of making sure they look natural but also long and full. The trio is also very fortunate to be sponsored by Aria Studios for all our makeup needs.

Princess Brittany waving to rodeo fans, friends and family during her grand entry lap.

8. Any favourite outfits?

It is so hard to pick just one favorite outfit! We probably have close to 50 pieces to mix and match, so I always love when our wardrobe committee gets creative and changes things up. I feel most comfortable when we are in our riding or rodeo attire because its extension of my personality and style. My favourite look would have to be our white Wrangler jeans with our navy blue “fringe” shirt. The top was made by Janine of Janine’s Custom Creations and I absolutely love how they look in grand entries! My most cherished wardrobe item are our custom Alberta Boots that match our Canada 150 leathers. They are so unique and I love anything patriotic! They also have crowns and our initials on them so to me they represent our trio’s place in the legacy of Calgary Stampede Royalty.

9. Anything else you would like to add?

I’m so grateful to share this experience with so many people, but I’d love to say a big thank you to my trio – Princess Lizzie and Queen Meagan – for making this experience so memorable. I’d also love to say thank you to all of my friends and family for their support during this busy year! It has been an honor to represent the Calgary Stampede and a privilege to be a part of be a part of showcasing western hospitality. I’d like to reach out to everybody I’ve had the fortune of crossing paths with this year. May we meet again. Happy trails!

One of Princess Brittany’s favourite parts of the Calgary Stampede was the interactions with all the amazing animals – from rough stock to back in the barns.


Tomorrow is the LAST day to enter the Calgary Stampede Royalty Contest. The Royalty Committee is accepting applications until August, 11, 2017. If you are interested in becoming a member of the 2018 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio, you can find more information at www.csroyalty.com.

Summer’s Rising Stars of Country

By Piper Whelan

Alberta’s Brad and Curtis Rempel are on the road to stardom as the up-and-coming country duo High Valley. After the release of their major label debut album and a whirl-wind rise in popularity, the Rempel brothers are appearing at two major country music festivals in Canada this summer. High Valley performed this past weekend at Country Thunder Saskatchewan in Craven, Saskatchewan. Later this summer, they’ll be in Calgary for Country Thunder Alberta (August 18-20).

Originally from La Crete, Alberta, the Rempels grew up listening to Ricky Skaggs albums on repeat, and dreamed of a career in country music from an early age. Now based in Nashville, the brothers are set to make those dreams come true, particularly if the upward chart movement of their recent singles is any indication. Being at the centre of the country music industry allowed the Rempel brothers to be exposed to a vast array of musical styles.

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“We’ve been coming to Nashville since 2001 now, but Brad moved here about seven years ago. I moved to Nashville four years ago,” says Curtis Rempel. “Being down here has definitely broadened our horizons.” These horizons go beyond the country genre, and he cites bands like The Chainsmokers and Imagine Dragons as a few of the artists that have inspired them recently. “The music that we’ve been able to get to know in the last 10 years has definitely affected the way that our music sounds.”

The particular style of country they first fell in love with, though, is never far away. “Our sound is a combination of the bluegrass that we grew up listening to … and the cool hit music that we’re hearing on the radio today, so we kind of combine those two worlds,” Rempel explains. “It’s kind of like we’re trying to bring an old-fashioned barn dance into 2017.”

For more information about the upcoming Country Thunder festivals, check out: www.countrythunder.com

Meet CS Queen Meagan

Photo by Tara McKenzie.

 

The Calgary Stampede is in full swing! Western Horse Review sat down with Meagan Peters, this year’s Calgary Stampede Queen about her experiences, her Stampede horse and much more about her exciting life experience as Stampede royalty.

Q. What are you most looking forward to during the 2017 Stampede?

A. During our year as the Royalty Trio, we attend about 400 events. All those events prepare us for the 10 days at The Worlds Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth! Thank goodness for all that experience because during those 10 days alone, we will attend 150 events. Throughout our year, I have most enjoyed getting to know the many committee members, volunteers, employees and sponsors involved in Calgary Stampede. I’m very much looking forward to spending some time with them during Stampede and celebrating what we have worked so hard to represent all year.

Although, I am most looking forward to the grand entries at the rodeo. As horsewomen, we work very hard keeping the horses conditioned so they are prepared for anything that may come along the way. The feeling I get in my heart before we race into any rodeo arena is like no other. It is such a thrilling experience to hear your name announced and the crowd cheering. Every year that I have watched previous trios at the opening ceremonies at the rodeo, I have hoped and prayed that some day that could be me. The first day of Stampede was one of the happiest days of my life.

Photo by Tara McKenzie.

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Q. What are your most memorable experiences to date?

A. There are so many wonderful and inspiring people that I have met this year and I am tremendously honoured to have been given the opportunity. I have loved traveling to Toronto for Grey Cup, Las Vegas for the National Finals Rodeo and Berlin for the International Tourism Convention.

My favourite trip was at the NFR, as the Calgary Stampede’s bucking stock were featured in it. I think that is when our role as an ambassador finally hit me as to what we represent, along with our western values and heritage. One of my favourite events most recently was attending the Presidents Rodeo at the OH Ranch. We did a grand entry before the rodeo, joined 300-400 of Stampede members for dinner and were entertained by the talented Gord Bamford. I loved mingling with the guests and at this time, I really felt part of a huge family with the same passion for Stampede. I remember leaving that night thinking, “This is where I belong and I’ll never forget this day for as long as I live.”

A young, future queen Meagan.

 

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Q. What was your experience like applying for the trio and your feeling at the crowning?

A. I have auditioned 3 times to be in the Royalty Trio and twice I had made it to the top six contestants. Each year of auditioning, I had so much fun in the competition. I have met so many lovely competitors and volunteers involved that I wanted to stay in touch with them. Coming so close in the finals of the competition each year gave me the fire that I would do what ever it took to be in the trio. In preparation for my third time auditioning, I had taken a Dale Carnegie Public Speaking course. It was an 8-week program with intense speech preparation and impromptu practice. This gave me so much more confidence to speak publicly as I was more timid in my first two years auditioning.

 

On crowning night in September, this was the most nerve wracking experience of all. I had stumbled on my impromptu speech and my music did not work properly for my choreographed ride. I was dying of embarrassment and defeat. I was thinking, “Great, I have just had the worst performance in front of 200 people and I just blew my chances of being in the Royal Trio.”  …And then my heart dropped when I was announced as Stampede Queen. I had never been so shocked in my entire life! Thank goodness the rest of the competition before crowning went well. I am only human and everyone has bad days. Every day since being crowned, I have worked hard to support my team with Princesses, Brittany Lloyd and Lizzie Ryman. They are amazing individuals!

  • The Royalty Contest is now open and applications are being accepted until August 11, 2017! For more information, visit: www.csroyalty.com

Queen Meagan’s personalized boots, spurs and hat.

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Q. How has this year changed your life?

A. Everyday this year, I think how lucky I am to have been given this opportunity. I try not to let this year slip away too quickly and take in every experience to the second. Personally, I have become more focused on what all this has meant to me and how it has changed my life. I will always be involved with Stampede after my year is over. I would love to volunteer more of my time in the Queens Alumni and support future trio members. I cherish the ability to talk to people I do not know and value the life experience this program has given me for future careers and personal relationships.

Check out the Stampede Queen and Princesses on Instagram @stampedeqandp.

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Q. Please tell us about your royal horse?

A. “Blue” has been one of my favourite experiences this year. She is a 6-year-old blue roan and it is her first year in the Royalty Program. She has taken over for “Hawk,” as he will be retiring. She is very sweet but will throw some sass my way every now and then. She has been very quiet in parades and has found out recently just how fast she can go in grand entries which is every Queen or Princesses’ dream. She has been trained by Clay Webster himself before our Equestrian Committee found her. Clay is a sponsor of our program and I cannot thank him enough for all the training he has given us a trio this year. I will be heartbroken to say goodbye to Blue and the end of our year but know she will be in great hands!

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Q. Please describe a typical day in the royalty life?

A. Stampede time is really busy. But even prior to the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth, we were busier than ever and had many events to attend in a day. Our usual wake up time is around 5, 6 or 7 AM to get ready. Doing our hair and make-up has become routine and have become much faster than when were were first crowned! Before Stampede we attended pancake breakfasts in the morning at various schools and many fundraiser events. In the afternoon, we visited sponsors if we have the chance and either head home to change for the evening or grab lunch. In the evening, we attend Stampede Foundation meetings, Happy Trails at retirement homes, events that are going on at Stampede park or additional training on Stampede related events. If we did not have an event or training in the evening, we will ride our horses in Mossleigh, AB – which sometimes involves bathing the horses before a parade. In the summer months, we have been attending local parades and rodeos surrounding Calgary every weekend. I usually do not get to bed before 10 PM most nights but every day is worth packing it all in!

Q. Best beauty tips?

A. All of my beauty tips I owe to The Aria Studios! Liz has been an amazing sponsor and I use all of her make-up in my morning and evening routines. Liz’s signature products is her lipsticks. We are constantly talking, smiling, taking photos and must always be “camera ready” in case a surprise interview comes up. A lipstick that stays on all day is key! The Aria lipsticks do just that! I also love her skin care, face masques/scrubs and foundation powders. I will always use her line of skin care and make up for life!

 

Q. Favorite outfit?

A. My favourite outfit is our new “Blue Leathers.” It consists of a turquoise fringe, suede skirt and a matching vest. Its has “CS” embroidered on the back, and a horseshoe concho on the front. And to top it all off, our turquoise and brown pointed boots sponsored by Lammles and our three ringed diamond jewellery set from Montana Silver. One of our other amazing sponsors is Janine’s Custom Creations! Janine sews a lot of our shirts, skirts, and leather formal outfits herself. We have advisors that request a certain look and Janine will shape that idea and bring it to life. What would we ever do with out her and our wardrobe experts, Kary Otto and Laverne Peckham!

There are many sides to the talented and beautiful Calgary Stampede Queen Meagan Peters. If you get the chance to see her this week, be sure to say hi!

Meagan on a family fishing trip in Saskatchewan last Thanksgiving. She says, “For my family this is a tradition. I love sturgeon fishing there – It’s always a challenge. The competition is tough but there are huge fish!”

Country Festival Survival Guide

Photo by McKenzie Fotos.

Summertime country music festivals always promise great fashion, fun with friends and the musician line-ups are becoming bigger and better than ever. Two festivals that should be on everyone’s bucket lists are the two Canadian Country Thunder stops. For the overnight camping experience, the ticket is Country Thunder Craven. Held July 13-16, Craven always promises a rocking good time, and this year headliners include Blake Shelton, Keith Urban and Toby Keith. For more info: www.countrythunder.com/festivals/craven-sk. Meanwhile, for day concert-going, Country Thunder Calgary is back for it’s second year at Prairie Winds Park in North West Calgary, August 18-20. Headliners for the event include Blake Shelton, Braid Paisley and Thomas Rhett. For more info: www.countrythunder.com/festivals/calgary-alberta. Western Horse Review is bringing you the definitive survival guide for fashionable festival go-ers that need to beat the heat, while still looking cool and comfortable.

Necessities

Photo Credit: McKenzie Fotos. Outfit by Cody & Sioux.

1. Sunglasses, Sunscreen and a Great Hat

These aren’t just fashionable items, these items can save your skin and head from the sun on a long and hot festival day. Sun-stroke and horrible sun-burns aren’t cute, make sure to regularly apply sunscreen, and mesh current fashion-trends with necessity by picking out an adorable pair of sunnies and on-trend western hat to protect you from the rays.

2. A Water Bottle

Speaking of staying comfortable in the heat, it is so key to make sure you have a refillable water bottle on hand to stay hydrated. We recommend S’well water bottles, not only are they chic and will compliment your outfit, they stay cool long throughout the day. www.swellbottle.com


3. A Phone Charger

Long days swaying to the music and instagramming your favourite bands and outfits mean for low batteries on your phones. Make sure to pack up a back-up phone charger source, personally we are totally crushing on these unicorn battery packs, perfect for a country music festival.

4. Quick and Easy Snacks

You will be the hero of your crew if you pack some light and easy snacks to munch on during your favourite set. Bananas, apples, granola bars, nuts for protein and some candy will keep you guys rocking long into the evening while everyone else had to bail to grab dinner.

5. Travel Sized Beauty Products

Keep yourself looking polished and photo ready with travel-sized beauty products. We recommend packing a small cosmetic bag with mini-deodorant, dry-shampoo, blotting wipes, mascara, lotion, chapstick and a small brush to keep yourself feeling fresh and ready even if the temperatures sore about 25C.

Fashion Musts

Now we get into the fun stuff, this is what country festivals are all about, showing off your cool and eclectic style with your crew, while enjoying some great music!

1. Comfortable, yet Chic Footwear

This is one of the hardest things to achieve, nothing is worse than stumbling around the festival grounds with blisters on your feet because you chose the wrong footwear. Pick cute, low-heeled booties to protect your toes from the crowds, provide some support through those long days and still look on-trend while doing it.

2. A Great Light-Weight Bag

Pair your cute booties with an adorable cross body bag, unique fanny pack, or long strap bag so that you can carry your necessities, phone, and set-lists all in one place! We are majorly crushing on the long fringe cross body Vintage Boho Loves Louis bags, cute, western, and comfortable. A perfect combo – no sore shoulders here! www.vintageboholoveslouis.com

3. Flash Tattoos

Flash tattoos are a must at festivals, but be one step ahead of the crowd and take your flash tattoos to the next level. Head to a craft store and pick up a glitter marker so you can turn your tattoos into your own semi-permanent set lists. Never miss an act when you can look down on your wrist and it’s glittering right there for you!

Photo: McKenzie Fotos. Accessories by Classic Rodeo, Nanton, AB.

4. Layered Accessories

Compliment your flash tattoos with great layered bracelets, hand-cuffs and body chains to fully achieve festival-level cool.

 

Photo: Mckenzie Fotos. Outfit by Classic Rodeo, Nanton, AB.

5. Cover Up

This is both fashion must and necessity. A great light weight jacket, shawl or poncho that is light enough to tie to your cross-body, or tuck in your bag, is a perfect accessory to any chic boho outfit that can double as a blanket to sit on, or to wrap around yourself, if the temperature gets a little chilly at night.

6. Your Tribe Effects Your Vibe

The saying is true, who you surround yourself will make or break your day. Grab your best friends, show off your own personal unique style and enjoy your favourite music together. As festival style has been ramping up the last few summers, it’s important to remember the outfit doesn’t make the event. It’s key to have fun out there and dance like no one’s watching – if you have your best crew with you, it will make it even better!

Smokin’ Q

 

BY ESTEBAN ADROGUE

For many, Sunday morning came around smelling of fried eggs and homemade pancakes, with a fresh glass of squeezed orange juice. Tip-toeing all the way to Mom’s room…  For others, Sunday morning had a completely different meaning.

 

The sound of wood burning away in the BBQ’s, heating up the air, spreading that familiar smell, that aroma that takes us back to our childhood… It can only mean one thing: The Smokin Q BBQ Pitmasters Competition was finally here!

 

Lynnwood Ranch (Okotoks, AB) once again played host to the 3rd annual KCBS sanctioned BBQ Competition and BBQ Feast. The Smokin Q gathered 35 of the best Pitmasters and their crews from all around Alberta, in a sizzling battle against the toughest judges to become this year’s Pitmaster Champion.

The competition consisted of four different entries: first entry was BBQ chicken, a classic! Half hour later, competitors presented the judges with their best smoked ribs. Third entry consisted of delicious tender pulled-pork. And last, but definitely not least, judges were delighted with a low and slow roasted brisket. Makes you want to become a judge, doesn’t it?!

 

But before Sunday’s competition all participants had a chance to put their skills to the test.

Saturday night hosted the BBQ Bash Feast and Frolic. This year’s event consisted of competitors displaying a little preview of their abilities, not only to the judges, but to almost 300 guests as well. Everyone was eager to taste the pitmasters’ wonderful creations, which included everything from chorizo tacos with coleslaw, to a delicious fig and shrimp canapés

After sampling magnificent delights, guests were treated to a delicious brisket and salmon dinner, with a side of locally grown steamed veggies, salads and corn on the cob; followed by a dessert course of seasonal fruit trays and sweet delicatessens.

Once dinner was over, it was time to get up from those seats and shake that body to the rhythm of live jazz-fusion music. People came together to share a great time, laughed, had a few drinks and danced the night away as this year’s BBQ Bash came to an end.

To fully appreciate and understand the hard work behind such a fantastic culinary experience, we must venture back to Saturday morning; 10:00 am brought with it the first few trailers loaded with BBQ equipment, food, and competitors ready and full of ambition to demonstrate what they are capable of.

While pitmasters got their fires going, Western Horse Review went around interviewing different cooks and their crews, and talked about which elements a BBQ team should include to be the best.

 

They each described a “perfect BBQ” as having two crucial factors: food and atmosphere.

 

“It has to be the perfect balance among smoke, spices and meat. Not overpowering any single one of them.” – shared pitmaster Chris, head of Rocky Mountain Smokers.

 

All competitors also shared one unanimous tip: low and slow.

 

“…the best? Low and slow! It is a long and slow process, 250 degrees fahrenheit for about 8 to 12 hours” – said pitmaster Danny Cooper, from Fahrenheit 250 BBQ.

 

Sydney from Bordertown Bar-B-Que commented – “It’s all about friends coming together to have fun, a good time. You want to create a ‘party’ rather than a competitive atmosphere.”

 

Not only did they talk about friendship between their crew, but amongst their other rivals too. “We are all (competitors) a big family. If we don’t win, we are thrilled they (rivals) did! Barbecue it’s like golf; it’s not you against the competitors, it is us against those judges.” – Logan, part of the crew of Rocky Mountain Smokers.

 

As a very thankful attendee, I must admit with every bite of the tender brisket I took, I tasted that camaraderie, I felt that love, effort and passion pitmasters put in every single BBQ they cook.

 

Western Horse Review can’t wait to see y’all there again next year!

 

For more information, visit the Lynnwood Ranch website.

 

DOC WEST: Property Theft Protection

ILLUSTRATION BY Dave Elston

In all the years I’ve been living out West, I’ve never encountered or heard about property theft as much as in recent times. More than several of my country neighbours have experienced thefts of varying degrees – from fuel to equipment, some have even lost their prized horses. Audacious thieves are committing their crimes in the middle of the night, while country-folk sleep soundly in their beds, and not much seems to get done about it. Maybe there’s something to be said about the Old West and it’s way of dealing with thievery. Are our current property theft laws substandard? What’s a rural property owner to do? 

The Old West had its own unique brand of justice cooked up just right for the frontier. Back in those days the law didn’t require a cowpoke riding solo on the high plains to holler for help before drawing down with his Colt on midnight rustlers fixing for his best horse. The lonely pioneer widow could still swing a double-barrel Coach gun from the veranda with authority on a peeping scoundrel and wouldn’t be charged with careless use of a firearm. However, those days are long gone and today we live in a more civilized and gentile age where it seems you must treat robbers, murderers, bandits, and thieves with courtesy and serve them tea as they load up your wares and ride off into the sunset. So what can you do and what can’t you do? As a starting point, know that legalese is not ole’ Doc’s forte – so don’t go quoting me to the judge if you accidentally get a bit twitchy and start blasting away at some wayward visitors.

First off, Doc is a firm believer in the old adage that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Thieves always look for the easiest target, and will often “case” properties for a good haul and a quick easy getaway. You don’t need rows of razor wire or a moat to make your property an uninviting target, but there are preventative measures you can take. Thieves don’t want to be seen, they work most comfortably under the cover of darkness and anonymity. A bright, well-lit farmyard or acreage might just be the only thing he needs to see to move on to another target. Security cameras and alarms also enhance the deterrence effect – so long as the culprit knows that they are there – so if you have them, make sure they are visible and the intruder is alerted as to their existence. Gates are a terrific source of deterrence, crime statistics will attest that gated residences have significantly lower incidents of break-ins than ungated properties. A grumbly old yard hound will make a racket and if he’s mean enough might take a chunk or two out of a bandit’s backside. Remember that your acreage doesn’t have to be Fort Knox, it just needs to appear to be more impenetrable than your neighbours’.

However, I know as a wannabe John Wayne you’re really not interested in all the panzy stuff that the police tell you to do, and hell, you’ve not moved way out to scenic acres just to hide in your closet and dial 911. You want to know (not withstanding all reasonable precautions of course), if a determined rustler breaches the sanctity of your property and is in the process of loading up your best roping horse, can you draw down? Well, the answer is, it depends.

In 2012, the Conservative government passed Bill c-26 (also known as the Lucky Moose Bill after Chinatown store owner David Chen – who was charged with assault after he chased down, tied up and detained a shoplifter at the Lucky Moose Food Mart), which streamlined Canada’s antiquated and convoluted “defence of property” provisions. Overall, a successful claim of defence of property in the law requires three things:

  • A reasonable perception of a specified type of threat to property in one’s “peaceable possession”;
  • A defensive purpose associated with the accused’s actions; and,
  • The accused’s actions must be reasonable in the circumstances.

In acreage cowpuncher terms, that translates to:

  • That ropin’ horse you believe is belongn’ to you needs to be legally belongn’ to you;
  • What you do must be for the purpose of saving your roping horse from theft; and,
  • The force you use to save your roping horse from theft must be reasonable in the circumstances.

Each case will turn on its individual facts. For example, farmer Brian Knight of Lacombe, pleaded guilty to criminal negligence causing bodily harm after giving chase to, running down and shooting ATV thief Harold Groening in the hiney with a shotgun. Whereas Saskatoonian Hugh Lindholm was never charged at all for firing two warning shots with his hunting rifle at a stranger who had hurled a brick through his front window, and was standing on his deck demanding his car keys.

The rule of thumb is there is no rule of thumb. Each situation is different and so is each prosecutor and each judge. There are no hard and fast rules, but a good dose of common sense will tell you what force is reasonable and legal, and what force is going to land you a free stay at the crowbar hotel.

Doc West is grateful for the consultation provided by Dunn and Associates for the legal clarification offered in this article.