NCHA Futurity Recap

For those of us in the biz, travelling to year end shows most often headlined in the southern states, whether the Ohio Congress, AQHA or APHA World Show, or NRCHA, NRHA and NCHA Futurities is not only a great excuse to escape the onslaught of a Canadian winter, but also a perfect opportunity to scope out new trends and get a handle on the health of the horse industry in the United States – a true marker for our own economy. Not to mention observe and cheer on the top athletes in our respective disciplines and sports.

So, I was happy to head to Fort Worth last week to take in a few days of the National Cutting Horse Association Finals. And, this year’s event turned out to be a must-see, with several world records being broken.

Cheering easily rivalled the most intense hockey game in Canada, when rider Lloyd Cox rode One Time Royalty (One Time Pepto), for Mathews Cutting Horses to an NCHA record-breaking score of 230, in the Saturday night Open Finals. I can tell you – the spirit in the packed house that night was electric!

It was clearly One Time Pepto’s year as a sire, as not only did he sire the Open champion, but the Non-Pro Futurity Champion as well – One Rockin Pepto, making One Time Pepto the only stallion to sire the winners of both the NCHA Open and Non-Pro Futurities in his first foal crop.

I’m guessing his 2010 breeding book is filling up fast.

Here in Canada, you might remember Janice Eaton’s success this year at the Calgary Futurity, where she won the Non-Pro Futurity on another One Time Pepto – Pepto Time – purchased from Top Notch Performance Horses.

A typical trip to the NCHA Futurity encompasses not only watching the cutting, but attending any one of six days of sales, where this year, Western Bloodstock recorded net sales of $11,332,100 on 792 head, for an average of $14,308, compared to the 2009 net average of $13,260 on 778 head.

I believe there might have been another record broken at this sale when a partnership of three Canadians purchased the high seller of the sale – nine-year-old NCHA world championship mare, Jazzys Pep Talk. With $500,000 in earnings, she sold in foal to Dual Rey, and came with three High Brow Cat embryos. That translates to four actual mares, (as the three “recip” mares are present, and sell with the matron mare). And four wee hopes and dreams in the oven.

Jazzys Pep Talk was purchased by Lyle and Sandy Reid, Moe and Maureen Stewart and Dean Ness for $215,000, making her the high seller of the sale.

Pictured here are the happy new investors, from left, Lyle, Moe and Dean.

Ah, one of you did remember to bring the trailer, correct?

And here are the happy new moms, from left, Sandy and Maureen. I got to be included in the photo for fun. Hey, it’s not often you get to pet a World Champion mare!

I really have to apologize for the quality of the photos. My camera – an iphone!

As well as the great sales and cutting action, our trip included visits out to training barns and ranches. . . .

. . . . such as expat’s Ian Chisholm’s. . . where I fell in love with a rooftop. . .

. . . the Rocking W. . . . where I unabashedly lusted a fabulously functional arena and barn.

. . . and Buffalo Ranch, where a gorgeous barn-front captured my view. We have an outstanding article lined up in the Feb/Mar issue of Western Horse Review, featuring an interview with Buffalo Ranch creator, Shane Plummer. Stay tuned for his candid remarks on the state of the western horse industry.

We also had a chance to visit with brothers and homeboys Paul and Winston Hansma. . . .

. . . and take a quick trip to the Fort Worth Stockyards, where Christmas – Texas style – was in full swing.

Another highlight of the trip was the Stallion Showcase, where elaborate booths are set up, and attendees are able to view top stallions in the flesh, and meet the owners and collaborators of their breeding programs. It’s stall to stall people by 10:00 a.m. so be sure to attend early if you plan on going.

As usual, I brought home a ton of promotional material. There were some truly unique ideas presented by stallion owners this year, not the least of which included this logo-stamped icing on a shortbread cookie. I’ll be compiling a post of the promotional ideas I ran into at the Stallion Showcase early in January.

Stay tuned!

Four Non-Pro Titles Decided at Wrangler Futurity

For the red roan gelding known as Its Pepto Time, it was celebration time . . . again.

Since Janice Eaton bought her prized cutting horse in June from Top Notch Performance Horses Ltd. of Stony Plain, Alta., and turned him over to celebrated trainer Dr. Denton Moffat of Armstrong, B.C., the steed has been entered in three shows — and advanced to five finals.

The latest conquest? The 30th annual Calgary Stampede Cutting Horse Futurity presented by Wrangler, held at the Stampede Corral, where on Sunday afternoon Eaton and Its Pepto Time teamed up for the title in the Non-Pro Futurity class, scoring 216 and pocketing $8,869.74.

It’s been a whirlwind summer for Its Pepto Time, which carried Eaton, of Merritt, B.C., to the Non-Pro co-championship at the Idaho Futurity and partnered with Moffat for a third-place finish in Open Futurity at the Canadian Supreme in Red Deer.

Did she have any idea this horse had it in him?

“I don’t think we ever do,” she chuckled. “We’re just lucky when they turn out this way.”

Its Pepto Time and Janice Eaton capture the Non-Pro Futurity championship. Photo credit: Calgary Stampede

The Stampede’s five-day Cutting Horse Futurity, which wrapped up with weekend category finals, is the premier cutting event in Canada, offering more than $300,000 in prize money and attracting about 100 riders and 200 horses from as far away as Texas and Ontario this year.

While the trainers and professional riders wowed the crowd in the Open finals on Saturday night, the spotlight turned on Sunday to the four Non-Pro classes — Futurity for three-year-olds, Derby for four-year-olds, Classic Challenge for five- and six-year-olds, and 7 Up for horses aged seven or older. Non-Pro riders make no part of their income training cutting horses, and can only compete on horses owned by themselves or immediate family members.

Eaton and Its Pepto Time had finished third overall through two preliminary rounds in Non-Pro Futurity, but let it all hang out in Sunday’s six-team final, that 216 outdistancing the reserve champions, Grant Aykroyd of Wainwright, Alta., and Mac N Rey, by nine full points. Aykroyd collected $6,335.53 for second place.

“He was there for me every step of the way,” said Eaton, who praised her all-star cast of turnback riders and herd holders (Moffat, Les Timmons, Doug Reinhardt, and Scott Hanson) for their help in the ring Sunday. “It’s pretty nice to have a three-year-old that works that hard for you.

“He reads the cow well. I love the fact that he’s there for you all the time; no matter how tough it gets, he tries. He’s got nice, big stops, and he’s just a really sweet horse to be around.”

Eaton, a former Stampede Futurity champ in the Non-Pro Futurity class in 2003, very nearly pulled off the daily double Sunday — finishing as reserve champion in Non-Pro Derby aboard No Pinchin This Cat, while

Sandy Reid of Sherwood Park, Alta., and Lil Pepto At The Bar were crowned category champions.

Reid and Lil Pepto At The Bar notched a winning score of 220 during the six-team finale, taking home a cheque of $6,877.50. Eaton and No Pinchin This Cat posted a 216.5, for a runner-up payday of $4,912.50.

“Denton’s trained him from the beginning,” said Eaton of No Pinchin This Cat, her four-year-old gelding. “He’s a horse I raised out of my mare Pinch of Doc. She won the Open Classic Challenge in Calgary in 2004, and she and I were reserve champion in the Non-Pro the same year.

“So he’s definitely carrying on the genes.”

Lucy Streeter of Nanton, Alta., authored victory aboard Peptos Playtoy 005 in the Non-Pro Classic Challenge division. The pair beat out 12 other teams in Sunday’s final with a 219, claiming $7,294.56. Teri Paradis of Okotoks, Alta., and Lil Scoot N Peppy were a close second, earning a 218 from the judges for a reserve champion’s bounty of $5,758.86.

Dawn Hanson of Mountain View, Alta., and Always Stylish Jean prevailed in the Non-Pro 7 Up category’s 10-team final by the slimmest of margins. The horse-and-rider duo turned in a two-round aggregate score of 439, just nosing out the 438.5 turned in by Amanda Smith of Okotoks and Whirl N Play. Hanson tucked $2,365 into her Wranglers, while Smith took home $1,720.

The Stampede’s annual Futurity event showcases the pure athleticism, instinct, agility and intelligence of the cutting horse. With horse-and-rider teams attempting to cut at least two, and most often three, individual cows out of a herd within 150 seconds, cutting has evolved into one of the most exciting equine events in North America. Contestants are evaluated by a panel of three judges and assessed a score based on the horse’s instinctive reactions, the challenges made by the cows cut, and errors in judgment.

Montana Magic at Calgary Wrangler Futurity

The trainer from Big Fork wielded the big hammer on Saturday night.

Randy Holman of Big Fork, Mont., scored his first career win at the Calgary Stampede’s Cutting Horse Futurity presented by Wrangler, claiming the marquee Open Futurity class aboard Pretty Smart Cat. Then, he went right back out and doubled his pleasure by winning the Open Derby category on Olenas Pepto. In total, Holman’s daily double down at the Corral on Stampede Park was worth a cool $25,321.11.

“I started coming up here about 2000, and showed every year until 2006,” said Holman, whose winning mounts are both owned by Dave and Sandy Sabey of Bigfork, Mont. “That was the last time I was up here, because we’ve been doing the California run since 2006, but I just decided I didn’t want to make that long haul again this year.

“So I came up here to Red Deer (for the Canadian Supreme) and Calgary . . . and I’m very glad I did.”

The Stampede’s Cutting Horse Futurity, celebrating its 30th edition this year, is the premier cutting event in Canada, offering more than $300,000 in prize money and again attracting about 100 riders and 200 horses, including the sport’s elite, from as far away as Texas and Ontario. Saturday night featured the sublime skills of the professional riders and trainers competing in the Open categories, with finals in three equine age classes — the Futurity for three-year-olds, the Derby for four-year-olds, and the Classic Challenge for five- and six-year-olds.

Holman and Pretty Smart Cat scored a 218 in Open Futurity for $16,675.11, just nudging out Loren Christianson of Stony Plain, Alta., who posted a 217 aboard Annies Pretty Smart, owned by Darcy Geherman of Wembley, Alta., and collected the reserve champion’s cheque of $12,595.03. Over in Open Derby, Holman and Olenas Pepto rang up a 220 for a payday of $8,646, shading Philip Hanson of Weatherford, Texas, and LHR Smooth Jamie May, who scored a 216 for a runner-up prize of $6,681.

“Pretty Smart Cat held her end up and did real good tonight, especially with all the noise. This was kind of her first big deal. She’s a good little filly,” said Holman. “Olenas Pepto is a good little mare . . . I took her to the (National Cutting Horse Association’s) Super Stakes and made the semifinals on her there. We cut three really, really good cows tonight, and she was really dialled in. Right on the money.”

If not for some rotten luck, Hanson would be celebrating his Open Derby victory today. The Texan trainer had originally scored a 225, but after a judges’ review, it was decided that he and LHR Smooth Jamie May had caused a flush in the herd, and Hanson was penalized nine points and ultimately awarded a score of 216. “She’s an honest horse, and she’s got tons of eye appeal,” said Hanson of LHR Smooth Jamie May, a mare owned by South Lazy H Ranch Inc. of Weatherford, Tex. “She just loves her job.”

Meanwhile, in the Open Classic Challenge division, a pair of last-minute entries thrilled the Corral crowd with some fancy moves and fantastic scores.

Boyd Rice of Spearman, Texas, laid down a 227 aboard Third Cutting, owned by Carl and Shawnea Smith of Jacksboro, Texas. But Phil Rapp ofWeatherford, Texas, and Dont Look Twice, owned by Waco Bend Ranch of Fort Worth, played a perfect game of one-upmanship by following that up with a 228 — and the Open Classic Challenge title. Victory was worth $7,224.49 to Rapp, while Rice had to settle for a reserve champion’s cheque of $5,764.62. Rapp officially surpassed the $7-million mark in career earnings, having entered Calgary with a grand total of $6,999,710.

“We were fortunate enough to cut behind Boyd,” said Rapp. “My mare was as good as she’s been in a long time. She was low to the ground, and really stopping hard. We just put the pressure on, and let the judges decide. We got lucky, and it came out our way.”

Hanson, Rapp, and Rice also descended on Calgary with their prized mounts locked in a virtual dead heat for the NCHA’s Horse of the Year. By Hanson’s count, LHR Smooth Jamie May now leads both Dont Look Twice and Third Cutting by three points with just one event left on the calendar — the Pacific Coast Cutting Horse Association (PCCHA) Futurity next week in Paso Robles, Calif. “We all respect each other, and we all have a great horse,” says Rapp. “Here in Calgary, we all wanted to see each other succeed. One go-round, I said: ‘This is like the Three Musketeers — one for all, and all for one.’ ”

The focus of the Stampede’s Cutting Horse Futurity will shift on Sunday, Oct. 17 to the Non-Pro riders, who make no part of their income by training horses, and can only enter horses owned by themselves or immediate family members. The Non-Pro finals — Futurity, Derby, Classic Challenge, and 7 Up for horses aged seven or older — begin at 1 p.m. at the Corral. A $50,000 Limit Amateur Class, for those with NCHA earnings of less than $50,000 as of Jan. 1, 2010, is also offered within Non-Pro’s Derby and Classic Challenge classes.

A New Cutting Futurity

SUBMITTED BY CRISSY SANTANGELO

Silver Slate Arena in Stavely, Alberta, held its first Annual Fall Futurity from September 16-19, 2010.  The show pen was filled with some amazing 3 year old competition. As the two day aggregate took the top 13 of the Open Class and the Top 5 of the Non-Pro Class to the final day on Sunday evening, the final score determined the winner.

Champion for the open class taking home prize money and a Coats Saddle went to rider Guy Heintz on WS Hesastar, Owned by Neil Shanks.

Champion in the Open Division went to Guy Heintz on WS Hesastar. Photo Courtesy: Sandy Hansma

Reserve Champion with prize money and a Diamond Wool saddle pad went to Brad Pedersen riding One Time Kat, owned by Ron Mathison.
And for the Non-Pro Class, Champion was Mike Santangelo riding DMAC Sugarspoon and reserve champion Jake Knoblauch riding Miss N Lil Rey.

Non-Pro Champion Mike Santangelo on DMAC Sugarspoon. Photo Courtesy: Sandy Hansma

The show was a great success thanks to all our dedicated sponsors and our competitors.
And a special thanks to Sandy Hansma for taking the fantastic pictures throughout the show.

Calgary’s Cutting Horse Futurity

It’s a new twist on old adage. Long before he drifted into the sport of cutting, Dustin Gonnet worked cattle – literally – until the cows came home.

Gonnet, who lives near Cayley, Alberta, is one of the emerging names among cutting horse trainers in the Calgary area — and like most cowboys, he learned to put in an honest day’s work early in life. Gonnet grew up on a Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration (PFRA) community pasture south of Saskatoon, and worked on three more of the federal government’s spreads before turning to cutting at the age of 19.

“We’d treat cattle, check ’em twice a week, and doctor the sick ones, and in the fall, we’d have to sort everything on horseback,” recalls Gonnet, one of the local favourites who’ll be competing at the 30th annual Calgary Stampede Cutting Horse Futurity, presented by Wrangler, from Oct. 13 to 17 at the Stampede Corral. “We’d hold ’em up in a fence corner, and sort them out for the different owners, and trail ’em to various fields to be picked up.

“A guy learned how to work cattle pretty fast,” adds Gonnet with a laugh. “The one (PFRA pasture) I worked at, we were in a six-section field, so if you made a mistake and lost a couple hundred head of cattle, you were in trouble — because it took a long, long time to go get ’em back.

“You learn,” he adds, “not to make that same mistake twice.”

Gonnet hasn’t been making many mistakes in the cutting arena lately, especially where the Stampede’s Cutting Horse Futurity is concerned. He’s chalked up a total of five grand champion or reserve champion finishes over the past two years at the premier cutting event in Canada, which will once again feature a total prize purse of more than $300,000 at the Corral this fall.

About 100 riders and 200 horses, hailing from as far away as Texas and Ontario, are expected to turn out in mid-October for the Stampede’s 30th annual Futurity event for young horses, which is sanctioned by the National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) and Canadian Cutting Horse Association (CCHA).

The Stampede’s Cutting Horse Futurity features Open and Non-Pro rider categories — Open for horse trainers and professional riders, and Non-Pro for those who make no part of their income by training horses. Non-Pro entries can only ride horses owned by themselves or immediate family members.

Equine age classes are headlined by the Futurity category for three-year-olds, and also include Derby (four-year-olds) and Classic Challenge (five- and six-year-olds). On the Non-Pro side, there’s also the 7 Up class for horses aged seven years or older. A $50,000 Limit Amateur Class, for those with NCHA earnings of less than $50,000 as of Jan. 1, 2010, is also offered within Non-Pro’s Derby and Classic Challenge classes.

Gonnet, who expects to arrive at the Stampede’s Futurity with about a dozen client horses in tow, spent two years as an apprentice to regional cutting trainer Doug Reinhardt of Irricana, AB, before hanging out his own shingle in 2004.

In recent years, he’s been a serious contender down Stampede Park. During the 2008 Futurity, he won the Open Derby class on Christanis Blue, owned by Nanton’s Ronald Patton, and was runner-up in Open Futurity and Open Classic on Freckles Twisted Cat, owned by Calgary’s Wayne and Linda Meakin, and Angels Smart Date, owned by Okotoks’s Fred Millar, respectively. During last fall’s Futurity, Gonnet stood tall in the saddle again, winning Open Classic on Lizzys Play Girl, owned by High River’s Rob Leman, and placing second in Open Derby, again on Freckles Twisted Cat.

Dustin Gonnet of Cayley, AB, enters the 2010 Calgary Stampede Cutting Horse Futurity, presented by Wrangler, with five grand champion or reserve champion finishes over the past two years at the premier cutting event in Canada. Photo courtesy of: Calgary Stampede

And in mid-July at the 2010 Calgary Stampede Cutting Horse Competition, which is now a stop on the Mercuria/NCHA World Series of Cutting, he placed third in the Open division on Christanis Blue.

“In ’05 at Red Deer, we won the (Canadian Supreme’s) three-year-old Futurity, and we made a final or two down south at Nampa (Idaho) around that time, but it’s really been the last couple of years where I’ve had some consistent big wins,” says Gonnet, who was starting colts professionally at the age of 11. “I’ve been fortunate enough to get good customers, and real good horses to show.

“And it’s the experience factor, too . . . getting used to the pressure of showing against the best in the sport, being more mentally prepared. Doing what we do, it just takes a little bit of time, you know?”

The Stampede’s Futurity event showcases the pure athleticism, instinct, agility and intelligence of the cutting horse. With horse-and-rider teams attempting to cut at least two, and most often three, individual cows out of a herd within 150 seconds, cutting has evolved into one of the most exciting equine events in North America. Contestants are evaluated by a panel of three judges and assessed a score based on the horse’s instinctive reactions, the challenges made by the cows cut, and any errors in judgment.

The 2010 Calgary Stampede Cutting Horse Futurity, presented by Wrangler, will also feature a silent auction on Saturday, Oct. 16, with all proceeds going to the Bill Collins Youth Excellence Award scholarship fund. Anyone wishing to donate an auction item is asked to contact Stampede agriculture program coordinator Tracey Foster via phone at 403.261.0127, or via e-mail at tfoster@calgarystampede.com.

For more information on the Stampede’s Cutting Horse Futurity, visit www.stampedeagriculture.com

Texas Sale Bonanza

If you need a wickedly good reason to write off a trip to Texas, (yes, as breeders we’re allowed to do this!), you may want to consider the final two weeks of October. For beginning October 14, what’s sure to be three of the most discussed sales of 2010, are set to begin.

Beginning this trio is the Buffalo Ranch dispersal on Oct. 14 (demonstration, Oct. 13), at the ranch near Fort Worth. Seventy-two horses are on the auction block, with many of these offspring of Buffalo Ranch’s two signature stallions, Hydrive Cat and TR Dual Rey.

Next on the agenda for performance horse sale hounds would be Babcock Ranch, near Valley View, Texas, on October 15. While it’s billed as an annual production sale on their website, it’s more of a partial dispersal, as the sale will actually run through approximately 100 head comprised of not only yearlings and two-year-olds, but three-year-olds, finished show horses, broodmares and three stallions including 23-year-old Trashadeous (Be Aech Enterprise x Miss White Trash x Mr Gun Smoke), 15-year-old Captain Nice (Smart Chic Olena x Dry Tang x Dry Doc), and 25-year-old Lucky Little Lena (Smart Little Lena x Chexy Lady x King Fritz).

According to the Quarter Horse News post on the sale, owner Jim Babcock is of the belief the performance horse world is on the comeback trail and is quoted:

“When the public slowed down breeding, we continued to breed, realizing that there would be a shortage in the market of these young horses. 2008 and 2009 were very tough, now we’ve actually had a very good year in 2010 with a great response on our young horses. People have been totally impressed with the number of 2-year-olds and the quality that we have here.”

The final sale stop is Waggoner Ranch, where the current all-time leading sire of cutting horses, High Brow Cat, resides. And, where it appears every equine but High Brow Cat, and a few other select stallions, are on the block. For instance, the stallion Pretty Boy Cat, is selling. Incidentally, the Waggoners are the NCHA’s leading cutting horse breeder for 2009. According to Western Bloodstock, this sale is by court order, and includes 220 horses selling with no reserves. The sale will be held at the DLR Stallion Station, Weatherford, Texas, on October 30, with demonstrations on the 29th.

Am I reading your mind? You would like me to head down and report on these sales for you?

Gotcha. Loud and clear. It will take a bit of personal time, but if it will keep you happy and subscribed to Screen Doors & Saddles, I’ll do it, alright!

Saskatchewan Cutting Futurity

The Golden Mile Arena in Moose Jaw was the scene of the 2010 Agrium Limited Age Event, August 5 and 6. This is an exciting look at the 3-years-olds making their debut in the show pen! A big “Thank You” to Agrium and the Saskatchewan Cutting Horse Association for their sponsorship of this event!

Aggregate Winner of the Open Futurity was Miss N Lil Rey for owners Diane and Jake Knoblauch of Woking, Alberta. Knoblauch’s purchased the chestnut mare by Reys Dual Badger out of the mare, Miss N Diane, as a yearling in the Fort Worth Futurity Sale. Jake started her as a 2 year old then sent her to Loren Christianson, Stony Plain, Alberta, to evaluate. Loren said “I think we have a show horse” and she has been at Loren’s ever since! Watch for both Jake and Loren showing this mare at the fall futurities!

The Aggregate Winners of the Non-Pro Futurity were Sonitas Smart One and Mac N Rey. Sonitas Smart One is by Lenas Smart One out of the mare Sonitas Miss Royal. The dun gelding piloted by Chuck Armstrong, Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, was purchased by Melanie and Chuck Armstrong from Kevin Baumann, Red Deer, Alberta, and looked very solid. Mac N Rey, a sorrel gelding by TR Dual Rey out of the mare, Little Dixie Mac, was purchased as a yearling from Lee and Todd Wirthlin, Kalispell, Montana, by Grant and Gale Aykroyd, Wainwright, Alberta and trained and shown by Grant.

The Open Derby Aggregate was a tie between SDP Sweetie Pie and SDP Miss Me Sue. SDP Sweetie Pie, by TR Dual Rey out of the mare Little N Sweet Lena, was purchased by Kristine Roth, Sangudo, Alberta this spring after losing her good mare. Trainer Loren Christianson said “She was pretty green when she came home but you can see she has cow!” Loren and Kristine both plan to show her at the fall futurities. SDP Miss Me Sue by Meradas Blue Sue out of the mare Miss Telesis, is owned and shown by Les Jack, Rocanville, Saskatchewan. As a 3 year old this gelding won the Non-Pro at the Calgary Futurity and was Reserve in the Open and Non-Pro at the Supreme in Red Deer.

The Non-Pro Classic was also tied between Play Mia Twist and Tazalittle. Play Mia Twist is a sorrel mare by Play Mia CD out of the mare Solanos Last Cat that Chuck and Melanie purchased from Carl & Julia Gerwien. Melanie says “She’s a cow horse that never missed the finals in her 3 and 4 year old years. Tazalittle is a 5 year old bay gelding that Carol Bailey purchased from Don Lester last winter and left with trainer Clint Christianson. Sired by Pepto Taz and out of the mare Paulas Little Lena, Carol describes Tazalittle as a “horse that wants to be correct on a cow.”

The Open Classic was claimed by Gypsy Red Light shown by Loren Christianson. This sorrel mare by Gypsy Starlight out of the mare Red Acre, is an accomplished show horse that Les Timmons picked out for Ken Zender at the 2009 Fort Worth Futurity Show Horse Sale. Watch for Ken and Gypsy starlight at the Weekend Shows and Aged Events.

~ Elaine Good

Agrium Cutting Horse Limited Age Event, August 5, 2010
Judge: Tim Barry, Byron, Illinois
Open Futurity 19 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $1339.50 Total payout $2289.52
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
Miss N Lil Rey Loren Christianson Jake & Diane Knoblauch 72 $663.96
Smokin Little Cat Rod Thiessen Ray Frehlick 71 $526.59
Cats Maple Sug Rod Thiessen Ray Frehlick 70 $297.63
My Own Poppy Loren Christianson Ken Zender 70 $297.63
Playin On Desire Ryan Hodgson Dwight Murray 69 $183.16
Pastels Lil Player Jeff Schwitzer Don Biette 66 $125.93
WS Mia Smooth Cat Dale Clearwater Lanny Chernipeski 66 $125.93
Tequiero Lights Clint Christianson Chad & Lisa Eaton 65 $68.69
Non-Pro Futurity 6 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $423.00 Total payout $1373.00
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
Mac N Rey Grant Aykroyd Gale & Grant Aykroyd 70 $631.58
DMAC Shorty Spoon Doug Hines Doug Hines 67 $494.28
WS Playful Taz Matt Anderson Mathew Anderson 66 $247.14
Open Derby 8 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $564.00 Total payout $1514.00
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
SDP Sweetie Pie Loren Christianson Kristine Roth 72 $605.60
SDP Acres Of Blue Jeff Schwitzer Diane Smith 71 $484.48
SDP Miss Me Sue Les Jack Les & Corrine Jack 70 $272.52
WS Playful Lil Kitty Clint Christianson Rudy Thompson 69 $151.40
Open Classic 14 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $987.00 Total payout $1936.99
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
Gypsy Red Light Loren Christianson Ken Zender 72 $658.58
Zacks A Playboy Cain Quam Grant Devine 71.5 $522.99
My Own Badger Loren Christianson Harvey Giese 71 $309.92
Tazalittle Clint Christianson Carol Bailey 70 $164.64
Misty Blue Boon Loren Christianson Bob Butz 70 $164.64
Acres Of Boonlight Jason Hanson Jason Hanson 69 $116.22
Non-Pro Classic 14 @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $987.00 Total payout $1937.00
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
Tazalittle Carol Bailey Carol Bailey 72 $658.58
Smartyscowgirldiablo Les Jack Les & Corrine Jack 71.5 $522.99
Justa Indian Maiden Brad Tkacik Brad Tkacik 71 $309.92
Play Me A Twist Melanie Armstrong Charles Armstrong 70.5 $193.70
Lizzys Playgirl Rob Leman Rob Leman 70 $135.59
Puttin On The Pink John Paul de Moissac John Paul de Moissac 69 $116.22
Agrium Cutting Horse Limited Age Event, August 6, 2010
Judge: Tim Barry, Byron, Illinois
Open Futurity 19 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $1269.00 Total payout $2219.00
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
Laker Doc LLC Loren Christianson Howard McBride 73 $687.89
Cats Maple Sug Rod Thiessen Ray Frehlick 72 $554.75
Sonitas Smart One Melanie Armstrong Melanie & Charles Armstrong 71.5 $355.04
Miss N Lil Rey Loren Christianson Jake & Diane Knoblauch 71 $221.90
Pastels Lil Player Jeff Schwitzer Don Biette 68 $155.33
Tinker Date Clint Christianson Clint & Susan Christianson 65 $133.14
Booncheck Ryan Hodgson Ryan  & Jessica Hodgson 64 $110.95
Non-Pro Futurity 7 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $493.50 Total payout $1443.50
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
Sonitas Smart One Charles Armstrong Melanie & Charles Armstrong 71 $577.40
Playin on Desire Dwight Murray Dwight Murray 66 $461.92
Mac N Rey Grant Aykroyd Gale & Grant Aykroyd 65 $259.83
BSF Cinderella Cat Gale Aykroyd Gale & Grant Aykroyd 62 $144.35
Open Derby 8 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $564.00 Total payout $1514.00
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
SDP Miss Me Sue Les Jack Les & Corrine Jack 72 $605.60
SDP Sweetie Pie Loren Christianson Kristine Roth 71 $484.48
Comuter Cat Ryan Hodgson Ryan Hodgson 70 $272.52
TSD Dual Rey Jeff Schwitzer Jeff Schwitzer 69 $75.70
SDP Acres Of Blue Jeff Schwitzer Diane Smith 69 $75.70
Open Classic 14 entries @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $987.00 Total payout $1937.00
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
EBR Eye Candy Loren Christianson Darcy Geherman 72 $658.58
Shesa Smart Hickory Jeff Schwitzer Ken Gardiner 71.5 $522.99
Freckled Merada Buck McEwan Buck McEwen 71 $309.92
Tazalittle Clint Christianson Carol Bailey 70 $193.70
Gypsy Red Light Loren Christianson Ken Zender 70 $135.59
My Own Badger Loren Christianson Harvey Giese 69 $116.22
Non-Pro Classic 14 @ $75.00
Purse $950.00 Entry fee added to purse $987.00 Total payout $1937.00
Horse Rider Owner Score Payout
Play Me A Twist Melanie Armstrong Charles Armstrong 73 $658.58
Dualin For My Lady Grant Aykroyd Grant & Gale Aykroyd 72 $522.99
Tazalittle Carol Bailey Carol Bailey 71.5 $309.92
Freckled Merada Buck McEwan Buck McEwen 71 $193.70
Spoony Tunes Clint Busse Clint Busse 70 $135.59
Justa Indian Maiden Brad Tkacik Brad Tkacik 69 $58.11
Smart Little Bikini Joe Kramer Joe Kramer 69 $58.11

A Bridleless Cutting

The end of August marked a special weekend for cutters, at the Olds Cutters Classic. This event featured a full set of weekend classes, the first Alberta futurity, and a fundraising bridleless cutting and calcutta.

From left, the Calcutta auctioneer, and Alberta Cutting Horse Association directors Scott Wardley and Rob Leman. Photo courtesy Sandy Hansma

A bridleless cutting is always an exciting event to watch, perhaps because any horseperson, regardless of discipline or sport can truly appreciate the connection which is required to be present between a rider and horse for the pair to work through their run, without the benefit of a headstall and reins.

Photo courtesy of Sandy Hansma.

Above, Jocelynne Palin aboard Jeeps Grand Cherokee.

Besides, anything can, and sometimes will happen, making it a great spectator sport!

Photo courtesy of Sandy Hansma

Guy Heintz on Call Me Smurf, the super gelding who not only helped owner Neil Shanks post a 148 the previous day, but gave it his all at the bridleless on this day!

Photo courtesy of Sandy Hansma.

Above, Kamloops trainer Les Timmons and client pick up the reserve championship with a 147. The championship run was scored a 150 – Stoney Plain, Alberta, trainer Loren Christianson aboard EBR Eye Candy, owned by Darcy Geherman.

Below is a series of Lacombe, Alberta trainer, Brad Pedersen aboard Hicks First Player, owned by Geoff Thomas.

This sort of entertainment is a great finish to a long week of competitive cutting.

Thanks to Sandy Hansma for supplying these shots of moments in the show. We’re loving your work, Sandy.

For those of you who haven’t had a chance to observe a bridleless cutting, here’s a run with Wylie Gustafson marking a 148 at the 2008 Big Sky Aged Event in Montana.

Another update: Not to be outdone, the Saskatchewan Cutting Horse Association sent in this compilation of the bridleless at their recent Saskatoon show. Yeah!

It’s hard to believe summer has already nearly passed and entries for cutters, reiners and cow-horse’ers are due for the Canadian Supreme on Sept. 1.

Hope to see you there at the Western Horse Review booth.

CD Olena Dies

CD Olena: 1991 - 2010

The great cutting horse sire, CD Olena, ranked #3 among all-time leading living sires of cutting horse money earners, died August 6 at the age of 19.

According to Sally Harrison’s cutting blog:

“He was okay at ten on Thursday night and on Friday morning (August 6), we found him peacefully lying in his stall dead,” said David Hartman, DVM, who had leased CD Olena from Bobby Pidgeon last year to stand at Hartman’s Equine Reproduction Center in Whitesboro, Texas.

“He seemed in good health and was still very fertile. It was a horribly sad day here. I had become very fond of the horse and was looking forward to many more years with him.”

Dr. Fairfield Bain of Equine Sports Medicine and Surgery in Weatherford, Texas performed the autopsy and determined the cause of death as an aortic aneurysm.

The great Canadian connection to this sorrel colt by Doc O’Lena began when Bobby Pidgeon purchased the stallion for his Bar H Ranche near Weatherford, Texas in the early ’90’s. Soon after brothers Winston and Paul Hansma established themselves at the ranch and the rest is history.

The brothers became accomplished trainers and showmen, and much of that success came from showing the offspring of both CD Olena and Dual Pep, the two leading stallions standing at the Bar H.

Winston relates in Sally’s blog that he knew as soon as he began CD Olena as a two-year-old that the colt was special.

CD Olena won the 1994 NCHA Futurity  and the NCHA Derby. He also won the semi-finals of the NCHA Super Stakes, and placed fifth in the finals. He was named NCHA Horse of the Year in 1995.

Winston Hansma and partner Danny Motes, now own one of CD Olena’s most notable offspring, 2006 NCHA World Champion Stallion, CD Lights, an impressive stallion which is incidentally nominated to the Canadian Supreme.

CD Olena was buried at the Bar H Ranche arena where he and so many of his sons and daughters were started on cattle.

Yet, as Harrison states in her blog post:

“. . . the end of one chapter leads to the beginning of another. Paul Hansma has leased Bar H Ranche to operate as his training facility; CD Lights is proving to be a leading performance sire for Winston Hansma; Dr. Hartman has an ample supply of CD Olena’s frozen semen; and all the owners of CD Olena daughters will now hold them even more dear.”

Read all of Harrison’s post here.