• Trail Blazers – Mary Schaffer Warren

        Mary Schaffer Warren – Hunter of Peace By Debbie MacRae It was the spring of 1908, when a small party of six ascended a ridge of mountains at 8,750 feet, over what is now known as Mount Unwin, to view beautiful Maligne Lake in Jasper National Park, Alberta – the first white persons ever… [Continue Reading]

      Trail Blazers – Mary Schaffer Warren
    • Meet our Models

      Have you seen our September/October issue of Western Horse Review yet? Photographed by the talented Shelby Simmonds of Twisted Tree Photography at Webster Ranch, WHR put together one of our most elaborate fashion shoots to date. Focusing on fall fashion, we had several wonderful people come together to bring this shoot to life. This includes… [Continue Reading]

      Meet our Models
    • First Futurity Results Are In!

      Submitted by Elaine Good, Photos Courtesy of Barbara Glazer. The first two days of the Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show were dedicated to the Limited Age Event. These are classes restricted to horses just beginning their show careers and competing against horses of the same age for over $12,000 in prize money. It’s also the… [Continue Reading]

      First Futurity Results Are In!
    • It’s a Big Deal: Western Performance at Farmfair

      Farmfair International is one of Canada’s largest agriculture showcases. From November 7-11, Northlands in Edmonton, Alberta fills with over eight halls of western entertainment, including top producing sales, showcases and clinicians. Today Western Horse Review is focusing on what makes Farmfair International so unique for breeders, trainers and enthusiasts of western performance horses. During Farmfair events… [Continue Reading]

      It’s a Big Deal: Western Performance at Farmfair
    • Mason Jar Chicken Salad

      By MIKE EDGAR, Photos by TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY   Tired of horse show concession food? Here’s a healthy recipe you can pack to take with you! INGREDIENTS: 2 litre Jar 1 Chicken Breast, boneless skinless 1/4 cup Greek Yogurt, plain 1/2 cup Grainy Mustard 1/2 cup Honey Juice of half a Lemon 1/2 tsp. Kosher… [Continue Reading]

      Mason Jar Chicken Salad
    • Trail Blazers – The Famous Five

        By Debbie MacRae Welcome to our inaugural blog, honoring the Trail Blazers of our past. The Wild West has an infamous history synonymous with cowboys, horses, daring courage, conflict, outlaws, law-makers and law-breakers. Woven into this tapestry of the “wild” are many intriguing characters. Many men and equally intriguing, women of the west, forged… [Continue Reading]

      Trail Blazers – The Famous Five
    • Meet CS Queen Lindsay Lockwood

      Western Horse Review sat down with the 2018 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio, Queen Lindsay Lockwood, Princess Jaden Holle, and Princess Jessica Wilson, to discuss their year as Royalty. The women reflect on their biggest moments, their most gratifying connections and what they hope to leave behind as their legacies as they prepare to hand off their… [Continue Reading]

      Meet CS Queen Lindsay Lockwood
    • Brain Injuries & Mental Health Symposium

      Spruce Meadows along with the therapeutic product innovator, Back on Track Canada and leaders from the sport and emergency medicine community, recently announced the formation of a national consortium committed to increasing concussion and mental health awareness across the Canadian equine industry. Leaders from the western and English riding communities have come together to design… [Continue Reading]

      Brain Injuries & Mental Health Symposium

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Trail Blazers – Mary Schaffer Warren

 

Mary Schäffer with horse, between 1907-1911, Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies, Mary Schäffer fonds (V527/ps-151), whyte.org.

Mary Schaffer Warren – Hunter of Peace
By Debbie MacRae

It was the spring of 1908, when a small party of six ascended a ridge of mountains at 8,750 feet, over what is now known as Mount Unwin, to view beautiful Maligne Lake in Jasper National Park, Alberta – the first white persons ever to have witnessed its allure.

Mary Schaffer, her female companion, Mollie Adams, a botanist, three guides, 22 horses, and a dog, were on a quest to locate the mythical lake spoken of by the Stoney Indian Band of Morley, most of whom had never seen it themselves.

Depicted in poetic post-card perfection, Lake Maligne now presents on the covers of travel magazines and brochures – luring tourists to shores once guarded sacredly only by the native hunter. Mary, with her drawings, her camera, and her colored slides, opened the world that lay “away from civilization… lost so far as the world was concerned, in a sea of mountains to the north.”

The paternal branches of her family tree traced back to 1682, as Quaker refugees who had fled from Britain to America, having suffered the persecution of their religious beliefs. British society rejected them and they journeyed with their children to pursue a new start along Pennsylvania’s Ridley Creek.

Each of Mary’s parents married “outsiders”, and their unconventionality and determination formed a foundation of strength for their girl-child, traits, which coupled with her curiosity and rebellious nature, would carry her through the many trials she would suffer in her lifetime.

From a privileged upper-middle-class Quaker family life, Mary received a strong formal education, with enriched extracurricular classes in flower painting, geology, minerology, archaeology, sciences, botany, and natural history. Consequently, she developed strong interest and respect for nature, the indigenous people of North America, and their culture.

After eaves-dropping on a particularly heart-wrenching story told by her “Cousin Jim” in the US army, Mary learned of the advancing tide of white settlement, and the carnage wrought by the removal of western native populations from their land. He spoke of a baby peeping out from under the body of its fallen mother and her horror was so profound, she cried out, and was discovered, and sent to her room. Her introspection led to a love of the native people and the friendship which would eventually lead her to explore the Rocky Mountains on horseback, year after year.

Mary’s first opportunity to explore the “wild west” came when she was 14-years-old. Her father, remembering his own first rail travel at the age of eight, endeavoured to provide his daughter the same experience – across the great plains. Eager to explore the wild and free lifestyle of the western frontier, and its intriguing indigenous populations, Mary was dismayed and saddened to witness instead, the condescension and mistreatment of her “friends.” Yet even at a very young age, she was able to convey a message of affection, compassion and understanding for a very misunderstood race of people.

In 1880, on a steamer trip she made to the Alaskan coast, she explored Native settlements at every opportunity, even against the counsel of her chaperone. Her courage and acceptance led to a lifelong intrigue and fascination with the indigenous lifestyle and she embraced the people with an open heart and mind.

Mary Schaffer’s buckskin shirt, donated to the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies.

As a young adult, she expanded her travel after the 1885 completion of the Canadian Pacific Railroad. She would be accompanied by a chaperone, Dr. Charles Schaffer, who would later become her husband, despite being 23 years her senior. As a physician, and an avid scientist, her husband was devoted to the natural sciences, and in 1889, Mary agreed to accompany her new husband to a scientific gathering in Toronto. On her arrival, she was enthralled by a series of images of Lake Louise, which captivated her imagination. She had to travel there, and only a few short months later she would once again accompany her husband on her first visit to Canada’s wild west.

On that trip she witnessed vestiges of Colonel Wolseley’s boats, abandoned after the 1869 Riel Rebellion. She met Sitting Bull’s brother and his wife, and sought permission to take his picture. She was rebuffed by his request for money, and turned away – regretting her missed opportunity later.

Her first glimpse of the mountains would be from the tiny railway station at Gleichen, Alberta at 4:00 a.m. and that first impression would be indelibly carved in her mind for the rest of her life.

Mary would spend the next several years until her husband’s death, assisting him with his scientific research; studying plants, identifying, pressing, drying, painting, and photographing rare and beautiful botanical specimens. She became known as the “painter of slides,” and was eventually granted a life membership in the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, despite threats of strong opposition due to her gender. At one point, she travelled with Dr. Schaffer on the top of a boxcar, forty miles, to camp outdoors on the shores of Lake Louise!

In 1903, Mary met Sir James Hector, surgeon to the famous Palliser Expedition. Sadly, he would return immediately to his home in New Zealand, after the death of his son to appendicitis. Within a few short months, she too, would lose her mother, her husband, and her father. Mary’s life would plunge into despair; Philadelphia society would shun her; her family would take advantage of her. She would learn the “bitter lesson, to count the pennies, to lean on no one, and make the best of crumbling fortunes.”

But the brief encounter with Sir Hector stimulated Mary to seek solace in the mountains, their majesty and their mystery. She resolved to compose and illustrate the Guide to the Flora of the Canadian Rockies that she and her husband had dreamt about but never started. And so she returned to Lake Louise, entrusted to the care of a young Boer war veteran and guide, by the name of Billy Warren. Under his guidance, she developed the outdoor skills required to complete her mission, and in so doing, became the first non-aboriginal woman to explore the areas encompassed by Banff, Yoho, and Jasper National parks.

A picture of Mary Schaffer-Warren is in her book entitled A Hunter of Peace. The picture  was taken by her friend Mollie Adams in 1907.  It says Moore family fonds (V439/PS-2) WMCR – which references the second edition of A Hunter of Peace with illustrations from photographs by the author and by Mary W. Adams and others – as referenced in the book available at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (WMCR).

In 1911, the Canadian government approached Mary to survey Maligne Lake, a task previously assigned only to men. Her accomplishment as an artist, photographer and writer stood her in good stead. Her survey resulted in the inclusion of Maligne Lake within the confines of Jasper National Park.

Despite being 20 years his senior, Mary would eventually marry her guide and mentor, Billy Warren, to whom she always referred as “Chief,” out of respect for his skills as an outdoorsman. He would build her a home in Banff, which stands to this day as a symbol of the respect she garnered as an accomplished “Mountain Woman,” the name given her by the Stoney people.

In an excerpt of a letter to Raymond Zillmer of Milwaukee from Mary [Schaffer] Warren, on April 12, 1928, she wrote:

“No one may know I went among those hills with a broken heart and only on the high places could I learn that I and mine were very close together. We dare not tell those beautiful thoughts, they like to say ‘explorer’ of me, no, only a hunter of peace. I found it.”

 

Meet our Models

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

Have you seen our September/October issue of Western Horse Review yet? Photographed by the talented Shelby Simmonds of Twisted Tree Photography at Webster Ranch, WHR put together one of our most elaborate fashion shoots to date. Focusing on fall fashion, we had several wonderful people come together to bring this shoot to life. This includes the make-up talents of The Aria Studios and hair by Amber BigPlume. We also shot some amazing Food of the West dishes for future editorial – but we’re going to have to share those with readers in the future. So stay tuned!

For now, we’d like to introduce you to the lovely models seen in our Sept/Oct. fashion spread. Priding ourselves on featuring real people of the horse industry, we thought you might like to get to know them a little bit as well (if you don’t already).

Wearing a couple of outfits from Cody & Sioux, plus modelling some fantastic jewelry designs by Scott Hardy was Wendy Nelson. Wendy owns and operates Wendy Nelson Reining and Performance Horses – a training and breeding facility near Cochrane, Alberta. Wendy has been an active part of the Equine and Reining Horse Industry for 25 years throughout Canada, Europe and the USA. She has bred, trained, and produced many Reining Horse champions and finalists in Futurities, Derbies and Aged events. Wendy has accomplished year-end championship titles in NRHA Germany, Ontario Reining Horse Association, Reining Alberta, Alberta Reined Cow Horse Association, AQHA, and Reining Canada as well as being in the NRHA ‘Top Ten.’ Her coaching skills have led many of her Non-Pros and Youth to the same success.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Next we have our youngest models. Wearing the new EQ3™ helmets from Back on Track and some lovely  back-to-school fashions from Lammle’s Western Wear & Tack these two cuties kicked off the shoot. Both girls are avid riders in real life and can be found playing around with their Miniature horses, or taking in a trail ride on their senior mounts whenever the opportunity presents.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Next we have have Maggie Short. Maggie was the 2016 Calgary Stampede Queen and an avid show jumper. (Check out the past blog we ran about her here!) Besides the “Blake Lively” look she has going on, Maggie is one of the kindest people you could ever get to know and is always eager to help. For instance, on this shoot we had Maggie helping with everything from picking wildflowers, to looking after kids, to picking up our photographer, to packing up clothing at the end. And then, she steps in front of the camera and absolutely nails the shot…

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Next we have Amber BigPlume, who has helped us with a few WHR fashion shoots already. Amber was the 2013 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess and helped spread the word of Indigenous communities in trouble, during the torrential floods Alberta witnessed that same year. She is a talented musician and has been a performer in the Trans Alta Grandstand Show. She is additionally a very skilled hair stylist and has helped us create many looks for WHR fashion spreads. As if that weren’t enough, Amber is a fabulous model and always helps us bring the entire feature together.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

Sporting a Smithbilt hat, neckace from Cody & Sioux and a belt from Scott Hardy is Whitney Watson Wilson. As an accomplished competitor in the reining and cow horse competition arenas, Whitney is making a name for herself on the professional show circuit under the guidance of Clay Webster Performance Horses Inc. She recently won the Int. Open Hackamore at the Alberta Reined Cow Horse Association Snaffle Bit Futurity held in Claresholm, AB, and took the championship of the Level 1 Open Derby at the Equistro Cowtown Derby earlier in the year. She helped us saddle and prepare horses for this shoot and although she’s never had to model for WHR before, she pretty much killed it.

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

 

You won’t see this shot in the magazine, but we’re so glad it was suggested that Maggie try on one of our signature Skijor shearling coats, created by Janine’s Custom Creations. We think it was the perfect way to end the day. Stay tuned for some more behind-the-scenes looks from our autumn feature!

Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

First Futurity Results Are In!

Submitted by Elaine Good, Photos Courtesy of Barbara Glazer.

Glen Beveridge rides NRR Coles China Doll to the Open Futurity championship.

The first two days of the Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show were dedicated to the Limited Age Event. These are classes restricted to horses just beginning their show careers and competing against horses of the same age for over $12,000 in prize money. It’s also the very first time for the three year olds to be shown and it’s amazing to watch these youngsters! This event is organized by the Saskatchewan Cutting Horse Association to help breeders, trainers and owners develop and showcase their horses and programs. It’s held at the Golden Mile Arena in conjunction with the 4 day Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show where the facilities and great footing allow these horses to show their full potential!

The Barry & Elaine Good Open Futurity Aggregate went to “NRR Coles China Doll” for owner Warren Russell, Stoughton, Saskatchewan under the saddle of Glen Beveridge, Valley View, Alberta. Glen saw this 3 year old mare sired by “NRR Cat King Cole” and out of the mare “Chinas Instant Choice” being worked by Cody Smith at Ponoka, Alberta which prompted a phone call to Warren. Warren said “If you think she’s a good one go ahead and buy her.” He never saw her until she was shown at Moose Jaw! This mare is real sweet to be around and they hope to keep her feeling good and keep showing her through the fall futurities. They want to thank everyone who helped along the way including Clint Christianson, Tyler Darroch and Mike Belof. Thanks from GD Cutting Horses!

Elaine Speight was the victor in the Non Pro Futurity with her great mare, Hickory Boonlight.

The 3 Year Old Non Pro Futurity Aggregate also sponsored by Barry & Elaine Good was claimed by the accomplished showperson, Elaine Speight riding “Hickory Boonlight” owned by Bill & Elaine Speight, Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. The Speights found this blue roan mare, sired by “Boonlights Shining” out of the mare “QR Duals Hickory” advertised on the northernhorse.com website. They purchased her in the fall of her yearling year from Jennell Heptner and had “Boony” started by Anna Petrova of Strathmore, Alberta, as a two year old. Bill continued with training her on cattle, then the flag during the winter and more cattle work into her 3 year old year. The Speights were happy and proud that she did so well at the Moose Jaw Show. With her size, strength in the hind quarters and tremendous long stride they feel she has the potential to make a great horse.

Hesa Rey Cat is a stallion with serious potential, after taking home the derby title with Clint Christenson aboard.

The 4 Year Old Open Derby Aggregate went to “Hesa Rey Cat” owned by the class sponsor Kali Fortner, Bracken, Saskatchewan! Kali’s partner, Clint Christianson trains and shows “Hesa Rey Cat,” the sorrel son of “Dual Rey” that they purchased from Montana Ranch Cutting Horses of Big Fork, Montana. “Hesa Rey Cat” is the third colt that Clint has had the good fortune to train out of the great producing mare “ Shes A Cuttn Cat” and they look forward to his potential both as a show horse and stud prospect.

RH Purralator Cat made breeder and owner, Sandy Reid, proud, by taking home the Non Pro Derby win.

“RH Purrolator Cat” owned and shown by Sandy Reid of Leduc County, Alberta claimed the 4 Year Old Non Pro Derby sponsored by Donna Reid of Webb, Saskatchewan. This home raised gelding sired by “Smooth As A Cat” out of their mare “Jazzys Pep Talk” earned consistent 72’s during the show. “RH Purrolator Cat” is one of a pair of full brothers that Sandy was showing in the 4 year old class! They are both a finished product from Jeff Schwitzer’s Melville, Saskatchewan training program for 3 year olds that were easy for her to take over and show. Sandy says ““Rush” is the horse that won and he is a bit more sensitive that the other. Thank you for having great ground for us to play in that is so important to us competitors!”

Hot Metal Smarts showed off her cow smarts winning the Open Classic for rider, Glen Beveridge.

“Hot Metal Smarts” returned to Moose Jaw after winning the 2017 Open Derby to take this year’s Les & Coreen Jack 5/6 Year Old Open Classic under the saddle of Glen Beveridge. This 5 year old mare by “Metallic Cat” out of the mare “Jazzy Jay Bar” was bred and owned by Hollingworth Farms Limited of Valley View, Alberta. This mare has really come on nice this year and they hope to keep her going for the fall futurities.

The Non Pro Classic championship went to Scott Brady aboard One Cuttin Cat.

The Belof Performance Horses 5/6 Year Old Non Pro Classic Aggregate was won by the 6 year old mare “One Cuttin Cat” for owner and rider, Scott Brady of Midale, Saskatchewan. Scott purchased this mare sired by “One Time Pepto” and out of the great mare “Shes A Cuttn Cat” raised by Montana Ranch Cutting Horses as a two year old from Clint Christianson and Kali Fortner. She was a finalist in last year’s Futurities in Red Deer and Calgary. Scott says “this mare is very sensitive and because of that she makes me a better rider; it’s a challenge that’s good for me!”

Tazalittle and rider Carol Bailey finished off the aged event by captured the 7 Up Champion title.

The turnerhorses.com 7 Up Non Pro Aggregate went to “Tazzalittle” owned and shown by Carol Bailey of Kyle, Saskatchewan. Carol describes her bay gelding sired by “Pepto Taz” and out of the mare “Paulas Little Lena” as her “lifelong partner in this sport. He’s easy to get ready and he knows his job. A true testament to his training foundation.”

Full results of the Moose Jaw Cutting Horse Show and Limited Age Event are available on the SCHA Website: www.scha.ca.

It’s a Big Deal: Western Performance at Farmfair

Farmfair International is one of Canada’s largest agriculture showcases. From November 7-11, Northlands in Edmonton, Alberta fills with over eight halls of western entertainment, including top producing sales, showcases and clinicians. Today Western Horse Review is focusing on what makes Farmfair International so unique for breeders, trainers and enthusiasts of western performance horses. During Farmfair events […]

[Continue reading…]

Mason Jar Chicken Salad

By MIKE EDGAR, Photos by TWISTED TREE PHOTOGRAPHY   Tired of horse show concession food? Here’s a healthy recipe you can pack to take with you! INGREDIENTS: 2 litre Jar 1 Chicken Breast, boneless skinless 1/4 cup Greek Yogurt, plain 1/2 cup Grainy Mustard 1/2 cup Honey Juice of half a Lemon 1/2 tsp. Kosher […]

[Continue reading…]

Trail Blazers – The Famous Five

  By Debbie MacRae Welcome to our inaugural blog, honoring the Trail Blazers of our past. The Wild West has an infamous history synonymous with cowboys, horses, daring courage, conflict, outlaws, law-makers and law-breakers. Woven into this tapestry of the “wild” are many intriguing characters. Many men and equally intriguing, women of the west, forged […]

[Continue reading…]

Meet CS Queen Lindsay Lockwood

Western Horse Review sat down with the 2018 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio, Queen Lindsay Lockwood, Princess Jaden Holle, and Princess Jessica Wilson, to discuss their year as Royalty. The women reflect on their biggest moments, their most gratifying connections and what they hope to leave behind as their legacies as they prepare to hand off their […]

[Continue reading…]

Brain Injuries & Mental Health Symposium

Spruce Meadows along with the therapeutic product innovator, Back on Track Canada and leaders from the sport and emergency medicine community, recently announced the formation of a national consortium committed to increasing concussion and mental health awareness across the Canadian equine industry. Leaders from the western and English riding communities have come together to design […]

[Continue reading…]

Meet CS Princess Jaden Holle

Western Horse Review sat down with the 2018 Calgary Stampede Royal Trio, Queen Lindsay Lockwood, Princess Jaden Holle, and Princess Jessica Wilson, to discuss their year as Royalty. The women reflect on their biggest moments, their most gratifying connections and what they hope to leave behind as their legacies as they prepare to hand off their […]

[Continue reading…]