Western Artist – Sheila Schaetzle

    Sheila Schaetzle is wild about nature, and you'll be wild about her vibrant landscapes on display at the Calgary Stampede's Western Art Showcase.

    Western Artist – Sheila Schaetzle Western Artist - Sheila Schaetzle

    Western Wedding – Katie Montague and Cayley Wilson

    Planning a Western Wedding? Get inspired by the Wilson wedding.

    Western Wedding – Katie Montague and Cayley Wilson Western Wedding - Katie Montague and Cayley Wilson

    Wild West Cocktail – Pear Stagecoach

    A western take on a vintage cocktail.

    Wild West Cocktail – Pear Stagecoach Wild West Cocktail - Pear Stagecoach

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    Real Life Rodeo Queen Secret Number 9

    You may not believe it, but I eat a lot.

    Real Life Rodeo Queen Secret Number 9 Real Life Rodeo Queen Secret Number 9

    Gary Rempel – the Pick-Up Man

    Gary Remple is a very well admired pick up man, who has a long history with rodeo.

    Gary Rempel – the Pick-Up Man Gary Rempel - the Pick-Up Man

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Western Artist – Sheila Schaetzle

Story by Piper Whelan

Calgary artist Sheila Schaetzle will be featured at this year's Calgary Stampede Western Art Gallery.

Calgary artist Sheila Schaetzle will be featured at this year’s Calgary Stampede Western Art Gallery.

Sheila Schaetzle is wild about nature. It’s evident in her art: in how she paints radiant autumn leaves in a distant valley, in the way she creates light on a snowy path. This Calgary-based artist uses her Maritime roots and Alberta home for artistic inspiration, both of which will be seen in the six paintings she’ll have on display at the 2015 Calgary Stampede’s Western Art Showcase.

Schaetzle grew up in the Restigouche region of New Brunswick, the subject of many of her paintings. “A lot of my work is inspired by the colours in the fall and just nature in general,” she says. “My dad was a hunter and a fisherman, so we were always outdoors, whether we were on the beaches or we were camping out somewhere. As far back as I can remember, I have really loved being out in nature, amongst the trees.”

"Early Snow" will be on display at the 2015 Western Art Gallery.

“Early Snow” will be on display at the 2015 Western Art Gallery.

Schaetzle admired many artists featured at the Western Showcase in the past, but never imagined that she would be among them today. “Going to the art show was always a big part of attending the Stampede,” she says. She’s exhibited in the Western Art Gallery for three years; prior to that she volunteered by giving demonstrations in the Artists’ Window booth. She is proud “to be part of that now and have my work on exhibition next to some of these great Calgary artists.”

Her love for art began at a young age, filling sketchbooks as a child and studying art throughout school. She decided to pursue art more seriously in 1998 with night classes, as well as learning from books and experimentation. Schaetzle works with oils, acrylics and mixed media, and loves exploring different techniques. Her goal is to create a “painterly” view, “something that’s not necessarily what you’re going to see in a photograph, but something that’s more original and on the creative side,” she explains.

"Rocky Mountain Sketch II" was exhibited at the 2014 Western Art Gallery.

“Rocky Mountain Sketch II” was exhibited at the 2014 Western Art Gallery.

“I’m thinking more in terms of big shapes and concepts that aren’t necessarily based on realism [when beginning a piece]. I’m not thinking about painting a tree, or painting a house; I’m more interested in creating content and creating a structure that is more about shape and value.”

She describes her process as “freeing,” and often works from sketches rather than photos. “Even in the sketching stage I’m working out a lot of what needs to happen, eventually, when I get the paint on the paint brush. So I journal about the thoughts and ideas that I have about what I want to achieve,” she explains. These are broad ideas on the feeling she wants to convey. “Often it’s based on something that I’ve seen or experienced, or a memory that I’m working from … I believe in painting what you know.” This way, each painting tells a story connected to the place or experience it depicts.

"It's a Beautiful Day" will be on display at the 2015 Western Art Gallery.

“It’s a Beautiful Day” will be on display at the 2015 Western Art Gallery.

When creating artwork to submit to the Western Art Gallery, Schaetzle focuses on what will suit the venue, and also considers the Stampede’s international audience. “It’s an opportunity for artists to share all of the wonderful things that we have in the west — our mountains and our foothills. Our scenery is just full of beautiful landscapes, from our rolling hills to our green pastures, so there’s a ton of content that artists can use.”

"Million Dollar View," a new painting that is part of the Rocky Mountain Series exhibited at the 2014 Western Art Gallery.

“Million Dollar View,” a new painting that is part of Schaetzle’s Rocky Mountain Series exhibited at the 2014 Western Art Gallery.

When she’s not at work in her studio, Schaetzle gives weekly art classes at the Calgary School of Art, and volunteers in her local arts community. Her work is on exhibit at Calgary’s Leighton Art Centre. Visit her website to check out more of her artwork and her blog on an artist’s life.

Western Wedding – Katie Montague and Cayley Wilson

Date: July 13, 2013

Photographer: Sharon Fibelkorn

Ceremony Location: The home of Mike and Carol Roberts Ojai, Califonia

Reception Location: Abbotsford, British Columbia

The Horses: “I had a surprise entrance planned for myself and Ryley Ray (Cayley’s daughter) that only my parents and my bridesmaids (and just a few others) knew about. We were delivered in a horse drawn carriage from a nearby horse. I will never forget the look on Cayley’s face when we came up the driveway, I could see tears that were streaming down his face. I wanted to include Ryley Ray in as much as possible, and this entrance made her feel so special!”

The Rings: Katie’s ring was a surprise that Cayley had chosen himself. It features a perfectly round, brilliant Certified Canadian Eskimo diamond. Cayley’s ring was chosen by Katie in California; a smooth platinum band with a beveled edge for comfort when he’s riding.

Wilson---horses

Wilson---flowers

Their Story: Katie Montague is a successful Realtor from Ojai, Califonia who never imagined she would end up married to a Canadian working cow horse trainer, but fate had its own way of making other plans.

The horse industry is a small on,e and the working ow horse industry is smaller yet. So when a mutual friend had ideas of setting up Montague and British Columbia trainer, Cayley Wilson, Montague had her mind already made up. However, after a chance meeting in the fall of 2011 and a phone call shortly after, she realized maybe Wilson was a person she had more in common with than she knew.

“What I came to find out was that we were both traveling down similar paths, one that we could share our experiences with and perhaps help each other out in others. We decided to be friends with no expectations. During the four months we talked on the phone, I began to see some amazing traits in this man that I would not have guessed. He was a sincere, honest, integral man and I began to admire him greatly for those attributes. He was passionate about his little girl Ryley Ray, and I loved that too.”

The long distance friendship soon turned into something more when Montague visited Wilson at an Arizona horse show.

“We hit it off well and Cayley drove me back to California on his way home to Canada. An hour later, I got a phone call from him saying that he really didn’t think we could make it work with the distance, and he needed to be close to his daughter . . . I think I fell in love with him a little bit right then and there.”

One year later, they were engaged, and six months following was the small, intimate wedding that they both wanted.

Wilson---engagement-shot

Dress: Katie was stunning in a simple lace gown with material that runched across and tied in at the hip with a lace flower. It had a slit at the hip that allowed some flowered tulle to spill out. The train was minimal, in keeping with Katie’s theme of beautiful simplicity.

Bridesmaids: Dressed in Katie’s colours of coral and turquoise, the bridal party consisted of four ladies. Her maids of honour were her sister and best friend, then her step-sister and sister-to-be rounded out the girls’ side of the party. They wore simple sundresses Katie found at Old Navy with the intent of dressing them in something they could wear again. The flower girl was none other than Cayley’s little girl, Ryley Ray. She was dressed similar to the bride in a darling off-white dress.

Wilson---bridesmaids

Men’s Attire: Cayley’s best man was his brother, with three friends making up his groomsmen. They were dressed in starched jeans, Cinch shirts and their own boots and hats. Cayley was set apart with a classy black jacket.

Wilson---wedding-party

Cake: Katie went with a 3-tiered stacked carrot and lemon cake and found a cute cowboy and cowgirl topper. She topped off the cute western design by asking the caterer to decorate the rest with a horseshoe design.

Flowers: In a unique twist, Katie chose all silk flowers for the wedding. “The wedding was July 13 in Southern California, so we had to be prepared for the heat. I didn’t want to have to worry about wilting flowers and silks made it so much easier. No one would have known had I not told them!”

Wild West Cocktail – Pear Stagecoach

pearsc2When I bartended at a Calgary lounge in the late 90’s, and at the tail-end of an epic oil boom, it was all about the cocktail hour. Mixing up a precise combination of a whiskey sour, old-fashioned, fizz or martini – which, whether shaken or stirred, was always made with gin, never vodka – was a bit of an art form to those of us who proudly considered ourselves classic drink masters. The regulars who seated themselves at the smooth dark leather barstools of our horseshoe-shaped bar had discerning palettes and we prided ourselves on fixing a cocktail with deliberate perfection. The citrus fruit combination of a lemon, lime and orange, as well as maraschino cherries and a bottle of bitters was never far from hand, and it should be said, though the bar menu featured a half dozen pages of unique combinations, we would have rather walked barefoot on the contents of the evening’s broken glass pail, than be caught having to look up the ingredients of any cocktail ordered out of the well-worn, leather-bound menus.

I thought that sort of bartending artistry had long been forsaken in the mundane flavored-bottle offerings of today’s establishments, which have all but lost the classic Western cowtown vibe of those idyllic lounges. That is, until I travelled to Seattle to meet a friend with the sole intention of catching up on each other’s lives, whilst working our way through two full days of exceptional restaurants and drinking establishments along the wharf. There, what I had long considered to be a lost art in cowboy town was a thriving ingredient of the Seattle dining scene. Bartenders were mixing their own house bitters, creating amazing tinctures and fusing these ingredients all into a new generation of vintage-like cocktails, serving it all up behind the sort of white aproned and black tie pride I remembered from another place and time.bittersThe entire experience filled me with a nostalgic longing and inspired me to envision a return to the idea of a classic cocktail with a western twist. Hence, the Wild West Cocktail column, and my starter spring cocktail, the pear stagecoach. In another world, this might be referred to as a “sidecar,” but I’m striving for a western rift here, so I’ve taken a few liberties. Of note, no matter how precisely I’ve poured this recipe, it doesn’t take kindly to doubling. If you’re serving more than two, be patient, and revel in the art of the creation of each set.

Pear Stagecoach

Serves two.

Four ounces (120 ml) pear brandy

Two ounces (60 ml) triple sec (such as Cointreau)

One ounce (2 tbsp) freshly squeezed lime juice

Lime zest to garnish

Combine all into a cocktail shaker with ice and shake well. Strain into two chilled martini glasses. You may want to sugar rim them if you decide the drink is too puckery on its own. Garnish with twisted lime zest.

Joining Forces

They call him the Duke. Rod Olsen, Brent Trout and Kateri Cowley managed to help ten horses get a good start. All were ridden by their owners.

Story by Carrie Trout “It was a fantastic weekend!” “Can I quote you on that?” I laughed as I looked up into the elated face of clinic participant Jen Downey. It was June 6, 2015. The event: a colt starting clinic with Brent Trout, Rod Olsen and Kateri Cowley, held at Cheadle, Alberta. The two-day […]

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Real Life Rodeo Queen Secret Number 9

Katy Lucas as Miss Ponoka Stampede 2014: "Note the pure joy on my face at the discovery of pizza in the Ponoka Stampede Suite."

  You may not believe it, but I eat a lot. If you’ve ever seen me inhabiting a hospitality room at a rodeo, you may have noticed a heaping plate always in my hand. No one seems to believe it until they see it, but I eat a lot of food. I love joking around […]

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Gary Rempel – the Pick-Up Man

GaryRemple2

In the rodeo arena, this pickup man is known as a cowboy’s cowboy. Behind all the glitz of his career, Rempel has an instinctive understanding of livestock, backed by an extreme knack for showmanship. If you can handle the pressure of the rodeo arena, Rempel says the payoff to his job doesn’t necessarily fill his […]

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Vaquero Lore – The Spanish Spade

Spade-Bit

By Rod Honig Much maligned, misunderstood and sometimes even feared, the spade bit has been in the hands of horsemen in one form or another for centuries. The current versions we are familiar with date back to the vaqueros of Old California. So what makes a spade bit and how was it really intended to […]

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How To Crack a Whip

Crack-a-Whip-Lead-in

Have a hankering to whip-break your horse? Here are a few tips from professional cowboy, Sam Morrison for desensitizing your mount properly. By Jenn Webster 1) Start this process from the ground. It works best with a halter and lead shank, but as you can see in these pictures I am demonstrating the technique with […]

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May/June Issue Survey

MayJune15Cover

We would love to get your feedback on our May/June issue. To thank you for your time spent doing the survey, we are giving away a pair of Professionals Choice splint boots as a prize – we will randomly draw one winner from all of the responses received. The survey closes after a definitive number of […]

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