Young Guns – Ted Stovin

In the May/June issue of Western Horse Review, we searched out some of the most accomplished and influential youth in the western horse industry and compiled our first-ever Young Guns – Top 25 Youth Under 25. We came up with six categories: Ambassadors, Artisans, Entertainers, Competitive, Entrepreneurs and Science. From self-discipline to unwavering focus, we were reminded that the dreams often fostered in young minds and hearts can translate to adulthood, and that good old fashioned determination can still achieve what many think is impossible. We loved the true western code of ethic each of our top 25 exude.

It evolved into such an inspiring piece we decided to recreate it online, with the fuller interviews and stories of each of our deserving Top 25. Look for them here at Screen Doors & Saddles blog. 

The Calgary Stampede Ranch honoured Ted Stovin by naming bull rider 868, “Everything Cowboy.” Photo by Deanna Kristensen

Ted Stovin

(Nominated for Entrepreneurs)
Age: 22
Calgary, Alberta

Take the aptitude of a writer, the drive of a businessman and the air of a cowboy, mix it up and you have Ted Stovin, creator and owner of Everything Cowboy. For this young is rodeo promoter, his goal is to formulate a way to showcase rodeo to the masses. Since 2011, Stovin’s website and rodeo reporting have been raising some eyebrows and the profile of the sport.

I want to see pro rodeo cowboys on cereal boxes and making a pro athlete’s salary,” mentioned Ted Stovin. “That drives me to promote and help move our sport forward.”

From his first experiences riding steers in 2002 to winning his first trip out on a bull in 2005, the rodeo bug has bitten him good.

Typical cowboy? Not really. He has an Associate of Arts Degree in General Studies from New Mexico Junior College and continued his education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas where he studied Business and Construction Management. In 2012, he landed back in Alberta to attend University of Calgary for a semester towards his Business Degree.

“I have the goal to be a millionaire by the time I’m 25,” smiled Stovin. “I’d like to do the television broadcast for the Calgary Stampede at some point. I’d like to do the same all year and for the CFR, too. I’d like to write for some bigger publications as well.”

With a load of confidence and the goods to succeed, this young cowboy is on a mission.

“I want to be in the Canadian Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame, as a builder of the sport someday.”

~ Deanna Kristensen

The Muse

Muse-Cover

“Wow, how does it feel to find out you’ve won Best Overall in the Cowboys & Indians Annual Photo Contest?”

That was the question I posed to Billie-Jean Duff upon hearing her photo had been chosen as the overall winner in the magazine’s prestigious annual photography competition.

“Surreal. Exciting. Awesome. Humbling. I anticipated Muse (the title of the photo) would do well in it’s category, but I never expected to be chosen for the top prize. Seeing the spread yesterday for the first time certainly made it ‘real’, so much so, I almost cried,” she related.
h
I’d been working with Duff, a southern-Alberta based rodeo photographer on a Buck Brannaman piece she was working up for the Jan/Feb issue of the magazine, when she initially divulged her win to me. Out of deference to the magazine’s newsstand date and the element of surprise, we kept her news under wraps until the C&I issue released.
h
Billie-Jean operates out of Rough Stock Studio, just outside of Claresholm, Alberta, and when she isn’t at her day-job, she’s shooting rodeos and western events.
h
The Muse was shot at the Rainmaker – an amateur rodeo in St. Albert. Duff relates she had been spending time behind the chutes that day, testing out a new wide angle lens she had recently purchased, when she came across young bull rider, Clayton, mentally preparing for his ride.
h
“Without disturbing his preparation, and without hardly two words said, I looked to him, motioned to my camera in hand, looking for his permission to shoot while he was so focused. With a quick nod, he gave me the go ahead.”
h
She only snapped one frame.

 Billie-Jean-Duff-Spread

 

 

Out of the Wild

outofthewildcoverI’m certain many of our readers are fans of Mark Rashid‘s writing, for his books are some of our most sought sale items. So, I thought I’d share news of the project he’s currently working on. In partnership with Wild Basin Films, Rashid is hoping to raise $775,000 to fund their independent feature, Out of the Wild, a film based on the novel by Rashid.

Out of the Wild is based on actual events – the story of Henry McBride, an alcoholic, down and out, modern era cowboy who has lost everything. McBride’s self-discovery begins when a no-nonsense ranch owner with a deep love for horses, introduces him to a quieter way of training a troubled mustang, a horse whose past and temperament mirror his own. What transpires is a story of love, redemption and moving both man and horse beyond their deepest wounds to discover lives they never thought possible.

The project reached the $50,000 quickly in the first 36 hours of it’s launch Kickstarter campaign, but needs to raise a significant amount of money in the 13 days left on the campaign. Here’s a short trailer about the movie.

Reader Survey

JanCover2014webWe rolled out the first issue of the year a few weeks ago, incorporating a few design changes and new departments and features. We’d love to get your feedback on it! As a thank-you for your time, we’re offering up a pair of Professionals Choice splint boots as a prize – we’ll randomly draw one winner from all the responses received.

The survey closes after a definitive number of responses so don’t delay. It won’t take but 5 minutes and we truly appreciate every response we receive.

Click here to take survey

(Readers and subscribers to the print or digital magazine only, please)

Day 9 – Walnut Cream Cheese Cookies

 

cookiecc

Day 9 – Walnut Cream Cheese 

Cream cheese gives this Martha Stewart cookie recipe it’s smooth, melt-in-your-mouth texture, but what I really love about it is I can make a batch and freeze the logs ahead of time. Handy when you need a quick last-minute plate of fresh cookies.

Makes about 4 dozen

INGREDIENTS:

4 cups all-purpose flour

1-1/4 teaspoons salt

2 cups (4 sticks) unsalted butter, softened

6 ounces cream cheese, room temperature

1-1/4 cups sugar

2 tablespoons plus 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2-1/2 cups walnut halves (1-1/2 cups toasted and coarsely chopped and 1 cup finely chopped)

DIRECTIONS:

Whisk together flour and salt  in a large bowl; set aside. Put butter and cream cheese in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until pale and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Mix in sugar and vanilla. Reduce speed to low. Add flour mixture, and mix until just combined (do not overmix). Mix in toasted walnuts.

Transfer dough to a work surface. Divide in half; shape each half into an 8 1/2-inch long log about 2 inches in diameter. Wrap each log in parchment paper; freeze until firm, about 30 minutes or up to 2 weeks.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees with racks in upper and lower thirds. Unwrap 1 log, and roll in 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, coating completely. Cut into 1/4-inch-thick rounds. Space 1 inch apart on baking sheets lined with parchment paper.

Bake cookies, rotating halfway through, until golden around edges, 18 to 20 minutes. Let cool on sheets on wire racks. Repeat with remaining log and remaining 1/2 cup chopped walnuts.

Day 8 – Ambrosia Macaroons

We thought we’d give Jenn the weekend off from her 12-day Christmas cookie countdown, and so I’m chiming in with two of my standbys.

coconut

Day 8 – Ambrosia Macaroons 

This new take on a classic macaroon has become my new favourite, with it’s Christmas flavours of orange and chocolate, and simply for the fact it’s so visually pretty on a plate of Christmas cookies.

Makes about 4 dozen

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

1/4 cup sugar

1/8 teaspoon salt

2 tsp. finely grated orange peel

3 large eggs

24 ounces sweetened flaked coconut (about six cups firmly packed)

6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted

DIRECTIONS:

Position a rack in the centre of the oven and heat to 350°F.

Line 2-3 large baking sheets with parchment.

Beat butter in a large mixer until smooth. Add sugar and salt and blend. Beat in orange peels, then eggs, one at a time. Mix in coconut. Drop batter onto sheets by a large tablespoon, spacing about an inch apart.

Bake one sheet at a time, until golden on the bottom and browned in spots, about 25-30 minutes. Cool completely.

In the meantime, melt your chocolate (I use a double pot, boiling water in the bottom pot).

When cookies are cooled completely and before you remove them from the parchment paper, using a fork, drizzle the chocolate in lines across the tops. Cool or chill another 30 minutes and then store.

Young Guns – John Murphy

In the May/June issue of Western Horse Review, we searched out some of the most accomplished and influential youth in the western horse industry and compiled our first-ever Young Guns – Top 25 Youth Under 25. We came up with six categories: Ambassadors, Artisans, Entertainers, Competitive, Entrepreneurs and Science. From self-discipline to unwavering focus, we were reminded that the dreams often fostered in young minds and hearts can translate to adulthood, and that good old fashioned determination can still achieve what many think is impossible. We loved the true western code of ethic each of our top 25 exude.

It evolved into such an inspiring piece we decided to recreate it online, with the fuller interviews and stories of each of our deserving Top 25. Look for them here at Screen Doors & Saddles over the next six months, as I’ll reveal one every week or so!

Murphy has been riding all his life. He began with team penning and then switched over to working cow horse a couple of years ago. He credits his life in the country to the person he has grown to be. Photo by Barbara Glazer.

John Murphy

(Nominated for Competitive)
Age: 19
Wetaskiwin, Alberta

John Murphy is a 19-year-old country boy whose cow horse talents skyrocketed him to the top of National Reined Cow Horse Association charts last year. Riding Pepto Peppermint, a 2008 stallion by Surely A Pepto and out of Haidas Pepermint, Murphy swept the championships of four non-pro divisions at the NRCHA Circle Y Ranch Derby in San Angelo, Texas. He took home four buckles, a fistful of cash and had driven over 40 hours with his parents to do it.

Murphy accepted his awards with modesty, citing mentors and educational videos as the tools as aiding in his success. He made cow horse folk back in Canada buzz with praise.

Murphy laid claim to a mountain of international titles against some tough non-pro competition. He trained for those awards in the dead of a Canadian winter without an indoor arena or benefit of live cattle. Instead, Murphy used what he had available to him and packed several loads of shavings out to his family ranch shop – where he had also strung up a mechanical cow on the outside of the building. Using only the wood particles for footing atop frozen ground, Murphy and his horse prepared themselves for the 2012 event in Texas. When he needed guidance, the young rider would return to the house to watch a cow horse training video.

Murphy has been riding all his life. He began with team penning and then switched over to working cow horse a couple of years ago. He credits his life in the country to the person he has grown to be.

When it came time for Murphy to contribute financially to his show ventures, he began apprenticing underneath his father, who was a farrier by trade for over 30 years.

“I needed a job that could allow me to make some good money but still be at home. Farrier work allows me to ride horses half the day and do farrier work for the other half,” he says.

However, he is also currently evaluating a long-term career option as an electrician.

“I like the work of a farrier and it’s very rewarding to be able to help horses that previously encountered soundness issues, but I have seen the direct results of a lifetime of farrier work through watching my father. I think ideally, I’d like to be a low-key part-time farrier on the side, in addition to working as an electrician. That way I wouldn’t have to break my body down and I could still ride good horses.”

~ Jennifer Webster

Young Guns – Rylee McKenzie

In the May/June issue of Western Horse Review, we searched out some of the most accomplished and influential youth in the western horse industry and compiled our first-ever Young Guns – Top 25 Youth Under 25. We came up with six categories: Ambassadors, Artisans, Entertainers, Competitive, Entrepreneurs and Science. From self-discipline to unwavering focus, we were reminded that the dreams often fostered in young minds and hearts can translate to adulthood, and that good old fashioned determination can still achieve what many think is impossible. We loved the true western code of ethic each of our top 25 exude.

It evolved into such an inspiring piece we decided to recreate it online, with the fuller interviews and stories of each of our deserving Top 25. Look for them here at Screen Doors & Saddles over the next six months, as I’ll reveal one every week or so!

A shining star in the barrel racing world, Rylee is already a two-time qualifier for the CFR.

Rylee McKenzie

(Nominated for Competitive)
Age:24
St. Paul, Alberta

Don’t let her age fool you. In professional rodeo, Rylee McKenzie is not the new kid on the block. It’s been ten years since McKenzie broke onto the Canadian Pro Rodeo (CPRA) scene and in that season, she won the CPRA Ladies Barrel Racing Permit Award for earning the most points in her rookie year.

Since she has gone pro, McKenzie has qualified for the Canadian Finals Rodeo two times. Her horses are fast, her goal is to win, but furthermore to McKenzie, she believes that being a barrel racer is a noble profession.

“A barrel racer symbolizes an idol, a role model, a professional, a lady, and must be elegant at all times,” said McKenzie. “So many young girls look up to more experienced barrel racers and they should represent the best version of themselves.”

According to McKenzie, her mom Debbi has been a great inspiration throughout her rodeo career.

“My mom did a great job, making sure I had horses to be competitive on.”

At this point, McKenzie said there are two dreams she still has in her mind.

“The first being to make the NFR and the second is to see a horse I’ve trained take someone to a major set of finals like the CFR or NFR.”

While growing up around horses and rodeo, she said barrel racing at a high-end level has always been a priority. With McKenzie’s gallant track record, being in the lead is the only place where this cowgirl aims to be.

~ By Deanna Buschert

Winter Storm 2013

Confession. I should be working. On other things – editing, writing, books, figures. A million other little details that circulate in a day in the life of a magazine editor. The thing is, it’s one of those rare, lovely occasions when we’re snowed in. Wee officially has a Snow Day from her country school, and even if we could dig out the skid steer from it’s drifted in home, there’s no particular desire to do so. We have everything we need. Except we ran out of chocolate. Last night. That was bad planning.

So, we’ve been meandering around the yard, making sure the animals are comfortable and well fed, and standing in wonder and awe of Mother Nature and the canvas of drifts she’s created – many well over our heads. With only one working lens for my DSLR, the “shoot” was a bit limiting, still, it’s quite impossible to miss the capturing the beauty of cold winter’s day on the prairies.

Enjoy.

wsyard wswirewreath wstwodogs1 wstwodogs wstuck&wee wsthreeamigos wssweetlilpepto wsslpatfence wsshelter wsrwee wsoldcar wsloghouse wshorsesatfeeder wsgate wsarena wsaamambo&blue

wszchristmaslights