Sleepy Cat

sleepy-cat-pic-web

BY JENN WEBSTER (Archive from 2005 Western Horse Breeders Guide, presented by Western Horse Review)

He was a dun-colored paragon 
of athleticism, beauty and charm, and was single-handedly credited for “…bringing back the Quarter Horse industry to life in Alberta,” as stated by a yellowed Calgary, November 28, 1959, newspaper archive of The Herald Magazine.

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Foaled in 1938 in Colorado, Sleepy Cat was imported by brothers Jac and Allie Streeter of Stavely, Alberta in March of 1942. According to the first edition of The Butte Stands Guard, a historical book from the Stavely, Alberta area, this stallion was the first ever, registered Quarter Horse in Canada. There’s no doubt that following his importation into the country, Sleepy Cat clearly played a significant role in the Canadian Quarter Horse industry. In fact, The Herald Magazine went so far as to praise this influential Canadian sire for the probability that one day he would likely “…take the same position as Old Sorrel holds in the Quarter Horse story in the United States.”

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Sleepy Cat was a versatile stallion 
who bore the American Quarter Horse Association registration number 620. He was a son of Red Dog (AQHA #55) by Ballamooney, and out of Fatima (AQHA #58), by Old Sheik. Sleepy Cat’s lineage traces back to the immortal beginnings of the AQHA and some of the most famous names in the blue book of Quarter Horses. Through circumstances, he is also linked to the original forefathers of the association – the gentlemen who first brought the AQHA registry to fruition.

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Sleepy Cat was foaled in Whitewater, Colorado and was raised by Jack Casement, a prominent breeder of Quarter Horses and a most influential founder of the AQHA. Jack was involved with the AQHA from its earliest, most primitive beginnings. According to Volume 1 of the AQHA Stud Book and Registry, it was the dream of the late William Anson (Christoval, Texas) to record the origin and attributes of the Quarter Horse breed, and it is a well-known fact that Dan Casement of Manhattan, Kansas also “contributed to the general store of knowledge concerning these horses.” However, it remained an “untouched field” until the writings of Jack Casement (son to Dan), and Robert M. Denhardt of College Station, Texas, “drew the spotlight of public attention to the Quarter Horse.” Their articles to various magazines “found a surprising response among breeders and users of Quarter Horses throughout the west.”

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Subsequent to this, the first serious discussion of a Quarter Horse organization was held in 1939. An informal meeting that included Denhardt among others, “formed the nucleus of an ever-increasing group of Quarter Horse enthusiasts and on behalf of this group a general invitation was extended to all interested parties for a meeting to be held in Fort Worth on March 15th, 1940, during the annual Fat Stock Show.”

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On March 14, 1940, a preliminary meeting was held where both Dan and Jack attended and agreed to help with the preliminary work involved in the “foaling of such an organization.” After the official meeting was adjourned on the eve of the following day, it was reconvened as the first meeting of the American Quarter Horse Association and both Casements were elected to the newly appointed board of directors – Dan as an Honorary Vice President and Jack as a Director.

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Back to Sleepy Cat. Jac and Allie Streeter were the sons of Harry and Mary Streeter. The Streeters had purchased the land that would become the “Streeter Outfit” in 1919, near Willow Creek, Alberta. It had previously belonged to James Ford. Harry was a long time aficionado of horses and can be credited with the production of one of the first indoor rodeos in Canada which he put on in 1929 at the Stavely, Alberta, skating rink. Additionally, he often held two-day rodeos on their ranch during the 1930s. Harry then turned to racehorses in the 1940s – Thoroughbreds, Arabians and Quarter Horses – and owned one of the largest racing stables in western Canada until he passed away in 1949. Harry’s sons had purchased the ranch from him in 1946.

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Both Jac and Allie followed closely in their father’s footsteps and were excellent horsemen. When they found out the good horse, Sleepy Cat, was at Jack Casement’s place, they jumped in a truck and brought him home to Stavely. Both the paternal and maternal sides of Sleepy Cat’s pedigree could be traced to the Steel Dust legacy and the stallion would offer much to the Streeter breeding operation. Steel Dust was a Quarter Horse “type” foaled in 1843 who attracted much attention in the southwestern states as a sire of running and cow horses. Sleepy Cat inherited the fabled Steel Dust profile – the smooth and compact shape, short back and deep barrel – without falling heir to Steel Dust’s single flaw, a bulging jaw. Sleepy Cat’s head was more refined and charming, and he possessed a mind and temperament to match. He had “an ideal disposition – mild and tractable as a breeding or working animal and highly intelligent.”

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Sleepy Cat earned equal credentials in the show pen as he did as a sire. At the 1945 Calgary Stampede, he was declared Champion Rope Horse  – winning on the same day Jac and Alice Smith were married. Sleepy Cat won many laurels over the years, appearing in numerous cutting contests and roping events. He was sire to at least 200 foals during the course of his life in Alberta and was often used for the breeding of Campbell mares in the Ad Day Quarter Horse operation, owned at the time by Alf Campbell of Alberta. The Herald Magazine credits this mating as that “…which brought the Quarter Horse Industry back to life in Alberta and established it in the almost fabulous manner we know today.”

herald-mag-nov-28-1959-web
Sleepy Cat was held in such high esteem as a sire that often he was claimed as the sire, or grandsire of horses who never so much as nickered “over the fence to him.” Of some 200 foals, only 28 were ever registered with the AQHA and all are now deceased. However, of those 28 horses was Black Gnat, a black gelding owned by Coy and Casement of Buffalo, Wyoming. Black Gnat was the only documented performing offspring of Sleepy Cat and achieved his Open Performance Register of Merit in 1952. Many of the other listed registered horses were owned by Streeters or Campbells. Sleepy Cat was known to ranchers as a “solid gentleman,” and often stood to outside mares, so it’s likely the rest of his foals exceeded in ranch duties, cow horse and roping events and were scattered across western Canada.

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In July of 1959, the much-loved stallion passed away quietly at age 22 in 
Streeter’s pasture. Gone but never to be forgotten, the horse’s epilogue would read, “undoubtedly it was Sleepy Cat and his offspring which stimulated the first [Canadian] interest and activity in the Quarter Horse business…”

Turning Them Out

Stallion-and-mareUnder the right circumstances, pasture breeding can be an effective technique for breeding operations to maximize their foal crops, while minimizing costs. Yet, with the demand for higher control over mating’s, plus the high values of individual mares and stallions, pasture breeding is a technique that often results in an increased conception rate in a world already riddled with too many unwanted horses. Even so, pasture breeding is a convenient approach to producing foals and may prove beneficial big and small. Here are some of the considerations to keep in mind when considering pasture breeding for your operation.

In simple terms, pasture breeding involves placing a stallion in with a band of mares to encourage natural breeding behavior. Unlike artificial insemination or hand-breeding, there is little human interaction involved. Ideally, the horses are turned out in an area that is big enough to encourage grazing and without small,confined corners where individuals can become cornered. Fencing should be adequate, shelter should be provided and the animals must have appropriate access to feed and water. Additionally a stallion should not be able to contact other horses on the opposite side of the fence, as this can sometimes lead to territorial problems, unnecessary altercations or unwanted breeding’s. If foals remain at the sides of mares involved in pasture breeding, the area should also be secure and designed properly for foals. If mares will be giving birth in the same pasture, this is typically not an issue, however the area should be designed and maintained for safe foaling as well.

Photo by http://photog.have-dog.com.

Photo by http://photog.have-dog.com.

The Disadvantages

Once a stallion is introduced into a harem of mares, the horses are seldom handled individually in the environment. Care must be taken prior to introducing the stallion with mares to ensure that all horses involved are infection-free. An infected mare can contaminate a stallion, who will in turn contaminate the other mares. Screening of reproductive infections should take place prior to introducing the animals together in a pasture.

Close observation and care of the animals can be difficult especially if the stallion becomes overprotective. Additionally, there is a potential for injury to both the mares and the stallion in a pasture situation. Nicks and scrapes are one thing but a stallion receiving a kick to the testicles from an unwilling mare is a very real possibility too. Plus, her dynamics and acceptance of the horses of one another are other factors that play key in pasture breeding.

It is possible for a stallion to reject a mare or certain mares. It is also possible for a stallion unaccustomed to “life on the range” due to a long history in the race or show arena, be unsure as his new position as a breeding animal. Some stallions take to a natural breeding program with no problem, while others may be confused by elements like creeks, uneven ground or even a mare in full heat. Inexperience stallions may require a paddock next to the mares (or a single mare) for a short while to help provide positive experiences and “education” – and ensure a stallion should be added to the group.

Safety is a primary concern with this breeding technique and one of the biggest limiting factors of pasture breeding. Some stallions may react violently when another animal or human approaches the herd, which makes the practice dangerous for a novice horse breeder. Additionally, the number of mares a pastured stallion can service is limited in comparison to breeding through other techniques such as artificial insemination – one of the biggest reasons it has become a less commonly used strategy in the equine industry.

The Advantages

The fact that very little hands-on involvement from humans can be done in a pasture environment can also be one of the biggest advantages of this process. Much less time consuming than teasing mares and preparing them for artificial insemination or hand-breeding, pasture breeding requires less from an owner and often results in a increased conception rate. (In a pasture situation, 20 to 40 mares per season is a reasonable number to expect a stallion to cover. Pasture breeding also typically garners high conception rates in healthy animals.)

Increased receptivity in shy mares and a relaxed attitude in mares that are opposed to restraints, stocks or other management-related stresses are additional benefits seen from pasture breeding. The practice may also be more economical for some breeders as there is a reduced need for stalls, breeding equipment and an experienced technician.

A Natural Situation Needs Forethought

Depending on the circumstances of a specific breeding farm, pasture breeding can be very beneficial. Careful consideration into all of the technique’s aspects should be weighed with insight from veterinarians and experienced breeders before entering into a pasture breeding plan. Although natural breeding situations can be very successful, they can also result in severe economic loss when they are executed carelessly.

Know Your Breeding Contract

Stallion-and-mare

Planning for a foal is exciting. Yet, the road to putting four tiny hooves on the ground requires more than 12 months of advance planning. There’s a proper mating to consider, paperwork to read through and a budget to stick to: Unless you prefer unexpected, financial losses.

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As mare owner, you will have certain expectations when you enter into a breeding agreement with a stallion owner or manager. If your contract does not adequately address your concerns, it is your responsibility to understand what your contract states, before signing it. Specifically, you should understand your fees and which of them may or may not be refundable. And always remember, any services performed by a veterinarian are not included in the set of fees seen on a breeding contract. Veterinarian fees are in addition to a stallion agreement.

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Whether you work with a veterinarian or breeding facility to get your mare in foal, Canadians in particular, should research what the contract says about procedures that must be followed to order shipped semen. For example, does a particular stallion require same-day delivery? What happens if the stallion owner receives numerous requests for shipped semen on the same day and cannot honor them all? Further to this notion, it’s wise for mare owners to understand what happens with fees paid if the stallion (or mare for that matter), is sold before the contract is complete.

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Mare owners should also pay attention to the stallion’s breeding season duration and know the last day he is available for service. And if the mare is not confirmed pregnant prior to the end of the season, know how many breeding seasons you will be able to keep trying to breed your mare.

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Breeding contracts are usually also very specific regarding what type and when, pregnancy checks are required. Some contracts will even state who must perform a check and the type of documentation that must be submitted to the breeder. Breeding soundness can be an entirely different frustration so it’s best to understand what your worst case scenario is, before entering into an agreement.

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And beyond all of the above, breeding contract foal assurances are another important aspect to consider, prior to first stage labour. Many breeding contracts will often ease a mare owner’s mind with the promise of a Live Foal Guarantee. Often a live foal is defined as a foal that stands and nurses. However, keep in mind that just because a foal can get to its feet and take a drink, does not necessarily mean it is a healthy baby. Say for instance, you have bred a Paint to a Paint stallion – does your contract consider the possibility of lethal white syndrome?

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Lastly, mare owners must fully understand what state or province’s law will apply, and where parties must bring a claim, should one occur. Just because a semen shipment is sent to Canada, does not mean the Canadian justice system can defend a mare owner in the event a breeding contract is not carried to completion.

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And while a breeding agreement may seem daunting to begin with, the end result of a beautiful foal is worth every worry. Enter into the contract knowing the real cost of breeding your mare will be more than simply just the stud fee and all parties involved will consequently have a better, working relationship.

Frozen semen tanks.

Frozen semen tanks.

Common Terms & Definitions of a Breeding Contract:

• Parties of the Contract – The names of the owners of both the mare and stallion should begin the contract. This section should include the address and phone numbers for both parties.
Stallion – The stud must be clearly identified, including his registration number(s). His location must also be specified, in addition to the season year he will be standing there.
Stud Fee – This one-time fee is for the stallion’s services. Some fees are required in full prior to shipping semen or insemination of a mare. Other stallion owners/managers may request only part of the stud fee, with the balance remaining to be paid in full once the mare is confirmed pregnant. *Price range for western performance stallions can be anywhere from $250 to a private treaty.

• Booking Fee – This fee is charged to reserve a place for your mare in the breeding schedule. Usually, the booking fee is non-refundable and due at the time you enter into the breeding contract. May be included, or in addition to, the stud fee, so read your contract carefully.  *Price range $100-$5,000.
Farm Fee – This fee goes straight to the stallion station or farm responsible for standing the stallion. It can cover the service of collecting the stud and preparing the semen for shipment, or insemination. This is not a common fee on stallion contracts. *Price range $100-$800.
Chute Fee – This fee is for mares that are on site for breeding and to cover the costs and time of teasing or watching her heat cycles. This fee should always be for “on farm” breedings only. *Price range $100-$600.
Semen Shipping Deposits and Fees – Equitainers or specialized containers required to ship semen are expensive pieces of equipment and therefore, many stallion owners require a deposit on them before they will ship the container out. However, this fee is usually refundable if the container is returned in a timely manner and in the same shape it was sent in. This fee may or may not also include courier services *Price range $50-$500.
Shipping Fee – This is commonly a collection and processing fee for the stallion station. Do not confuse it with a semen shipping fee as sometimes, they are two different fees. Some stallion stations may charge a shipping fee and then send a shipment collect. Although these fees will likely be outlined in your contract, they may be confusing at first. It is recommended to speak with the stallion station to go over all fees to prevent surprises. *Price range $50-$450.
Collection Fee – The stallion station or manager may charge a fee every time the stallion is collected to be shipped to the mare. Often the first shipment is included in the breeding fee, with additional shipments at a specific cost. Review your contract for details. *Price range – $75 to $400.
Handling Fee – In addition to the collection fee, a fee for the handling per collection is charged by the stallion owner to the mare owner. This fee is non-refundable and sometimes is blended in with a farm fee or a semen shipping fee. * Price range $75-$150.

Happy breeding season!

Happy breeding season!

4th Annual Prairie Futurity

A well-attended and very successful 4th annual Prairie Futurity was held on April 18th, 2014 at Prairieland Park in Saskatoon. The entries were up and the competition was fierce! Over $20,000.00 was presented in prizes & cash thanks to the assistance & support of our many generous sponsors. Horses eligible to compete in the Futurity are those horses purchased at past PQHB Sales.

OPEN 2 YEAR OLDS: Lunge Line, Trail in Hand & Conformation Class

Awards: payouts of $2100.00 CASH, an award blanket, 2 award chairs, Equine 2000, Masterfeeds ,Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals, 2 X $100 Cowtown gift certificates, 6 X $20 Early’s gift certificates, Hi-Pro feed

PH(4) Open 2 Yr Champion

Open 2 Year Old Champion, The Next Great Jewel

  Champion Handler: Shauna Getz, Lucky Lake, Sk.

Horse: The Next Great Jewel # 5466565 – 2013 Dun Filly

Sire: The Jewel Snipper

Owner of Horse: Steve Wick

Breeder of Horse: Whitby Farms, Lucky Lake, Sk.

 

PHRes Open 2 yr old class

Open 2 yr old Reserve Champion, Boom Boom Olena

Res. Champion Handler: Courtney Kwasnica, Aberdeen, Sk.

Horse: Boom Boom Olena #5467123 – 2013 Sorrel Filly

Sire: Solanos Boom Olena

Owner of Horse: Courtney Kwasnic

Breeder of Horse: Southern Springs Stable, Rockglen, Sk.

3rd place Handler: Kristi Anne Naaj, Saskatoon, Sk.

Horse: Shesa Smokin Annie # 5451625 – 2013 Bay Filly

Sire: Smokin Boonsmal

Owner of Horse: Keith Bryenton

Breeder of Horse: Haight Ranch, Hanley, Sk.

4th place Handler: Chad Haaland, Hanley, Sk.

Horse: My Butz Blue Velvet # 5464563 – 2013 Blue Roan Stallion

Sire: Butzie Boon Bar WF

Owner of Horse: Chad Haaland

Breeder of Horse: Allen Quarter Horses, Turtleford, Sk.

5th place Handler: Halle Stewart, Watrous, Sk.

Horse: MJ Bingos Cutie # 5501746 – 2012 Dun Filly

Sire: MJ Dual Power

Owner of Horse: Dean Stewart

Breeder of Horse: MJ Quarter Horses, Ste. Rose du Lac, Man.

6th place Handler: Cindy Quiring, Asquith, Sk.

Horse: Smart Shena Girl # 5506417 – 2013 Bay Filly

Sire: Smart Jack Bar

Owner of Horse: Cindy Quiring

Breeder of Horse: Southern Springs Stable, Rockglen, Sk.

 

YOUTH 2 YEAR OLDS: Trail-In-Hand & Conformation

Awards: payouts of $400.00 CASH, $100 Cowtown gift certificate, equine totes/goodies, Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, 5 X $20 Early’s gift certificates, Hoffman’s minerals , Hi-Pro Feeds

 

PH(3) youth  2 yr horses class

Youth 2 yr Old Champion, Solboons Royal Lace

Champion Handler: Josey Black, Swan River, Man.

Horse: Solboons Royal Lace # 5478119 – 2013 Sorrel Filly

Sire: Solanos Boon Olena

Owner of Horse: John Black

Breeder of Horse: Coldwell Ranch, Davidson, Sk.

 

PHYouth 2 yr old class - 2nd pLACE

Youth 2 yr Class 2nd Place, Oh San Lynx

Res. Champion Handler: Abby Black, Swan River, Man.

Horse: Oh San Lynx # 5449351 – 2013 Bay Filly

Sire: Little Oakie Cat

Owner of Horse: John Black

Breeder of Horse: Red Spring Ranch, Okla, Sk.

3rd place Handler: Cobi Quiring, Asquith, Sk.

Horse: Smart Shena Girl # 5506417 – 2013 Bay Filly

Sire: Smart Jack Bar

Owner of Horse: Cindy Quiring

Breeder of Horse: Southern Springs Stable, Rockglen, Sk.

4th place Handler: Halle Stewart, Watrous, Sk.

Horse: MJ Bingos Cutie # 5501746 – 2012 Dun Filly

Sire: MJ Dual Power

Owner of Horse: Dean Stewart

Breeder of Horse: MJ Quarter Horses, Ste. Rose du Lac, Man.

5th place Handler: Courtney Kwasnica, Aberdeen, Sk.

Horse: Boom Boom Olena #5467123 – 2013 Sorrel Filly

Sire: Solanos Boon Olena

Owner of Horse: Courtney Kwasnica

Breeder of Horse: Southern Springs Stable, Rockglen, Sk.

 

NON-PRO PERFORMANCE “Affordable Barns” Futurity CLASS – 3 YEAR OLD HORSES

Awards: payouts of $600.00 CASH, an award blanket, award stirrups, award buckle, 2 chairs, Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals ,2 x $100 Cowtown gift certificates, 2 X $20 Early’s gift certificates

PHNon Pro Permance Champion

Non Pro Performance 3 yr Old Champion, MTR Pistolpackinmama

Champion Rider: Mike Bertrand, Lloydminster , Alta.

Horse: MTR Pistolpackinmama # 5436718 – 2011 Gray Filly

Sire: Circle Bar Gray Gun

Owner of Horse: Mike Bertrand

Breeder of Horse: Myterra Ranch, Cadogan, Alta

Reserve Champion Rider: Jessie Wruck, Saskatoon, Sk.

Horse: Smart Oakie Cat # 5383203 – 2011 Bay Gelding

Sire: Little Oakie Cat

Owner of Horse: Scott & Jesse Wruck

Breeder of Horse: Red Spring Ranch, Okla, Sk.

 

OPEN PERFORMANCE “Affordable Barns” Futurity CLASS – 3 YEAR OLD HORSES

Awards: payouts of $600 .00 CASH, an award blanket, award stirrups, award buckle, 2 chairs, Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals ,2 x $100 Cowtown gift certificates, 2 X $20 Early’s gift certificates

PH( 1) Affordable Barns Open Champion

Open Performance 3 yr Old Champion, CD Wilywood

Champion Rider: Bonnie Gerich, Delisle, Sk.

Horse: CD Wilywood #5393739 – 2011 Dun Gelding

Sire:Tuko Two Wood

Owner of Horse: Sarah Watamaniuk Paddison

Breeder of Horse: Frank & Bonnie Gerich, Delisle,Sk.

PH( 3)  Open Performance Reserve Champion

Open Performance 3 yr Old Reserve Champion, Wkk Playin Safe

Reserve Champion Rider: Heather Chow, Prince Albert, Sk.

Horse: Wkk Playin Safe # 5362039 – 2011 Sorrel Gelding

Sire: Smart Lil Marmoset

Owner of Horse: Heather Chow

Breeder of Horse: Wayne & Kim Knaap, Maple Creek, Sk

 

Greenhawk’s OPEN HORSEMANSHIP CLASS

Awards: payouts of $500.00 CASH, an award blanket, awards valued at $500.00 , Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals

PHopen horsemanship champion

Open Horsemanship Champion, Good Little Talker

Champion Rider: Danielle Bergen, Warman, Sk.

Horse: Good Little Talker # 5327026 – 2011 Bay Roan Mare

Sire: Dimensions Cowboy

Owner of Horse: Danielle Bergen

Breeder of Horse: Mc Burney Farms, Coronach, Sk

2nd place Rider: Richard King, Saskatoon, Sk.

Horse: Scotch Time Sarge # 5218084 – 2009 Sorrel Gelding

Sire: Whisper In Scotch

Owner of Horse: Richard King

Breeder of Horse: Haight Ranch, Hanley, Sask.

3rd place Rider: Marilee Farrow, Dalmeny, Sk.

Horse: Sparkle Jack Sparrow # 5198368 – 2009 Bay Gelding

Sire: Footworks Freckle

Owner of Horse: Ron & Marilee Farrow

Breeder of Horse: Horseshoe Ranch, Frobisher, Sk.

 

K & K Land Management’s SEASONED RIDERS “DAY ON THE RANCH ” CLASS

Awards: payouts of $450.00 CASH, an award blanket, an award buckle, Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals , 2 chairs, $100 Cowtown gift certificate, Early’s gift certificates

PH(3) day on the Ranch

Seasoned Riders “Day on the Ranch ” Champion, Scotch Time Sarge

Champion Rider: Richard King, Saskatoon, Sk.

Horse: Scotch Time Sarge # 5218084 – 2009 Sorrel Gelding

Sire: Whisper In Scotch

Owner of Horse: Richard King

Breeder of Horse: Haight Ranch, Hanley, Sask.

PH(3) day on the Ranch Reserve Champion

Seasoned Riders “Day on the Ranch ” 2nd Place, WKK Promise

2nd place Rider: Wendy Naclia, Norquay, Sk.

Horse: WKK Promise # 5284739 – 2010 Sorrel Mare

Sire: Smart Lil Marmoset

Owner of Horse: Brian & Wendy Naclia

Breeder of Horse: Wayne & Kim Knaap, Maple Creek, Sk.

3rd place Rider: Mike Bertrand, Lloydminster , Alta.

Horse: MTR Pistolpackinmama # 5436718 – 2011 Gray Filly

Sire: Circle Bar Gray Gun

Owner of Horse: Mike Bertrand

Breeder of Horse: Myterra Ranch, Cadogan, Alta

 

Greenhawk’s NERVOUS NOVICE & YOUTH HORSEMANSHIP CLASS

Awards: payouts of $450.00 CASH, an award blanket, awards valued at $500.00 , Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals

PH( 2) Greenhawk's NN & Youth Champion

Nervous Novice & Youth Horsemanship Class Champion, Showdown Farrah

Champion Rider: Whitney Nepinak, Swan River, Man.

Horse: Showdown Farrah # 5293683 – 2011 Sorrel Mare

Sire: Whisper In Scotch

Owner of Horse: Ken Layng

Breeder of Horse: Barrie & Angela Stewart, Rockglen, Sk.

 

PH(2) 2 nd place NN & Youth Horsemanship

Nervous Novice & Youth Horsemanship Class 2nd Place, Ms Jewel Bar

2nd place Rider: Cobi Quiring, Asquith, Sk.

Horse: Ms Jewel Bar # 5338827 – 2010 Bay Mare

Sire: Smart Jack Bar

Owner of Horse: Cindy Quiring

Breeder of Horse: Southern Springs Stable, Rockglen, Sk.

3rd place Rider: Josey Black, Swan River, Man.

Horse: Silverado Coco Puff # 5339200 – 2010 Palomino Mare

Sire: Dox Silverado Gold

Owner of Horse: Southern Springs Stable

Breeder of Horse: Lazy J Bar Livestock, Borden, Sk.

4th place Rider: Abby Black, Swan River, Man.

Horse: Nitro Quill # 5420288 – 2011 Sorrel Gelding

Sire: Nitro Glycerine

Owner of Horse: Southern Springs Stable

Breeder of Horse: Running Bar F Quarter Horses, Grandora, Sk.

5th place Rider: Lacey Stewart, Watrous, Sk.

Horse: MJ Snickels Maggie #5326293 2010 Grullo Mare

Sire: Snickelsfritz Flip

Owner of Horse: Dean Stewart

Breeder of Horse: MJ Quarter Horses, Ste. Rose du Lac, Man

 

YOUTH RANCH HORSE COMPETITION

Awards: payouts of $100.00 cash, an award blanket, $100 Cowtown gift certificate, $20 Early’s gift certicate, equine feed , Hoffman’s minerals

PH(-3)-Youth-Ranch-Horse-x

Youth Ranch Horse Competition Champion, Showdown Farrah

Champion Rider: Whitney Nepinak, Swan River, Man.

Horse: Showdown Farrah # 5293683 – 2011 Sorrel Mare

Sire: Whisper In Scotch

Owner of Horse: Ken Layng

Breeder of Horse: Barrie & Angela Stewart, Rockglen, Sk.

 

NON-PRO “K&K Livestock” RANCH HORSE COMPETITION

Awards: payouts of a WORKING COW HORSE SADDLE, RESERVE CHAMPION BUCKLE , $1000.00 CASH, 2 award blankets, Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals, 2 X $100 Cowtown gift certificates, 2 chairs, Hi-Pro feed, 2 X $20 Early’s Gift certificates.

PH(4)-Non-Pro-Ranch-Champion

Non Pro Ranch Horse Champion, Lena Is San Smart

Champion Rider: Wendy Naclia, Norquay, Sk.

Horse: Lena Is San Smart # 4953682 – 2006 Sorrel Mare

Sire: Smart Adversary

Owner of Horse: Brian & Wendy Naclia

Breeder of Horse: Nanette & Mickey Choquer, Rockglen, Sk.

PHNon-Pro-Reserve-Ranch-Horse

Non Pro Ranch Horse Reserve Champion, Sparkle Jack Sparrow

Reserve Champion Rider: Ron Farrow, Delmany, Sk.

Horse: Sparkle Jack Sparrow # 5198368 – 2009 Bay Gelding

Sire: Footworks Freckle

Owner of Horse: Ron & Marilee Farrow

Breeder of Horse: Horseshoe Ranch, Frobisher, Sk.

 

OPEN “Moose Jaw Toyota Trailer Sales” RANCH HORSE COMPETITION

Awards: payouts of a one year lease of a Horse Trailer , RESERVE CHAMPION BUCKLE , $800.00 CASH, 2 award blankets, Equine 2000, Masterfeeds Equine feed, Hoffman’s minerals, 2 X $100 Cowtown gift certificates, 2 chairs, Hi-Pro feed, 2 X $20 Early’s Gift certificates.

PH(-3)-Open-Ranch-Horse-Champion

Open Ranch Horse Champion, Lena Is San Smart

Champion Rider: Dale Clearwater, Hanley, Sk.

Horse: Lena Is San Smart # 4953682 – 2006 Sorrel Mare

Sire: Smart Adversary

Owner of Horse: Brian & Wendy Naclia

Breeder of Horse: Nanette & Mickey Choquer, Rockglen, Sk.

PHOpen-RanchHorse-Reserve-Champion

Open Ranch Horse Reserve Champion, Kings Crystalite

Reserve Champion Rider: Seth Abrahamson, Broderick, Sk.

Horse: Kings Crystalite # 5273218 – 2010 Palomino Mare

Sire: Silver Sage Dually

Owner of Horse: Beth Manz

Breeder of Horse: Coldwell Ranch, Davidson, Sk.

PQHB Barrel Futurity and Derby
Futurity Rider Horse Breeder Run 1 Run 2
Nikki Ballard Classy Stage Pass Allen Quarter Horses 16.603 16.061
Dale Clearwater Profits Julianne Haight Ranch 16.476 16.432
Whitney Nepinak Showdown Farrah Haight Ranch 18.802 19.286
 
 Derby Rider Horse Breeder Run 1 Run 2
Karletta DeWitt Ruby Lookin E Breitkreuz 16.102 15.851
Tyrelle DeWitt Hawklands Andromeda Dave & Shirley Chostner 16.365 16.738
Kim Salmond Pepolenas Rebel Moon Scott Performance Horses 15.298 NT
Jade Lenard MTR Royal Chip It Ed Masson NT NT

 

Horse Breeders and Owners Conference

Temple Grandin speaking at the 2013 Horse Breeders and Owners Conference.
Photo by Victoria Ann Photography.

The 32nd Annual Horse Breeders and Owners Conference takes place January 10-12, 2014, in Red Deer, Alberta, at the Sheraton. Presented by the non-profit organization, Horse Industry Association of Alberta, the conference is a must-attend event for horse breeders, owners and riders with topics of interest for every horse enthusiast.

The Horse Breeders and Owners Conference welcomes delegates at 7pm on January 10th with an “Open Barn” reception in the Exhibit Hall. Due to popular demand, the “Open Barn” reception is once again open to the public free of charge to attend, socialize, network and shop around the equine trade show of over 50 sponsor booths. Industry Outreach Director from Colorado State University, Gary Carpenter, will kick off Saturday morning’s session at 8:40 am. Saturday evening provides a chance to network and socialize with wine, dessert and live entertainment provided this year by local singer/songwriter Randi Boulton. The conference continues until Sunday afternoon, with the Fred Pearce Memorial Lecture delivered this year by Dr. Camie Heleski.

Internationally recognized speakers are coming from all over Canada and the United States:

Lauren Barwick (British Columbia) – Overcoming Adversity to the Podium in the Para-Dressage

Gary Carpenter (Colorado) – Where is the Horse Industry Going?

Dr. Camie Heleski (Michigan) – Stereotypies: Why Does My Horse Do That?

Dr. Claudia Klein (Alberta) – Managing Reproduction with the Problem Mare

Dr. Katharina Lohmann (Saskatchewan) – Heaves: Is Your Horse At Risk?

Dr. Nancy Loving (Colorado) – Colic: Recognition, Myths, and Prevention and Conditioning the Equine Athlete

Clay Maier (Kentucky) – How to Drive Your Horse and Long Lining Benefits for All Disciplines

Curt Pate (Montana) – Ranch Horsemanship

Tammy Pate (Montana) – Yoga and Horsemanship

Jochen Schleese (Ontario) – Saddle Fit for Male and Female Riders

Dr. Mike Scott (Alberta) – Managing Osteoarthritis in Horses

Dr. Stephen O’Grady (Virginia) – Barefoot vs. Shoeing and How to Evaluate the Equine Hoof

Dr. Lori Warren (Florida) – Environmentally-Friendly Feeding and How Feeding Practices can Modify Behaviour

Tickets for the Horse Breeders and Owners Conference are $105, $90 for additional registrants when pre-registering. Registration is online at www.albertahorseindustry.ca. Registrations will also be accepted at the door for $105 a person.

The Stable Owners Seminar begins before the Horse Breeders and Owners Conference at 1:00 on January 10th and it is an afternoon of education specifically geared towards the stable industry. The seminar is free to attend and will also include a forum to discuss the Standards of Operations Manual for Stables and the future of the Alberta Stables Initiative.

Keeneland’s September Yearling Sale

Long considered to be a marker for the health index of the horse industry in general, the September Keeneland Yearling Sale, in Lexington, Kentucky, wrapped up last weekend with spectacular results, indicating a more-than-expected resurgence in the Thoroughbred racing world.

Gross sales of $280,491,300, the highest since 2008; the sale of 18 yearlings for $1 million or more, the most since 2008; and enthusiastic participation from what Keeneland termed a “globally deep buying bench” resulted in double-digit increases in gross and average, and a record median price.

Glenye Oakford, senior correspondent with Blood Horse Magazine explained what this means for the market and breeding industry, “Obviously, it’s great for the breeding industry, and it’s great for the sales. It’s also good because we saw signs of this, this doesn’t appear to be a fluke, we saw heading into this sale that the general market was pretty good for yearlings, the two-year-old sales this year were good, so it seems to be following a good upward trend, it looks like it is for real.”

Photo courtesy Keeneland

Interestingly and a key point to our western competitive breeding industry, she stated a huge factor in the success of the sale was not only the upswing of the economy, but importantly the smaller foal crops in the Thoroughbred breeding world, which have put supply much more in line with demand.

The current yearling crop comes from an estimated 23,500 North American foals, compared with the 38,361 in the 2005 crop that led to the peak 2006 yearling sale. This year’s North American foal crop — next year’s yearlings — is estimated at 23,000. The 2014 foal crop is projected at 22,000.

Additionally, international trade and a big demand worldwide for American racehorses accounted for the big gains of this sale.

Photo courtesy Keeneland

M.V. Magnier of Irish-based Coolmore Stud purchased the sale-topper, paying $2.5 million for a colt by War Front during the sale’s fourth session. Woods Edge Farm consigned the colt, who is out of the stakes-placed During mare Blading Gold Ring. Incidentally, War Front’s breeding fee in 2013 stood at $80,000, raised from $60,000 the year previous.

Keeneland Sales Director Geoffrey Russell — who warned about overproduction several years ago, now says he hopes there is some increase in the foal crop again, with people who took mares out of production bringing some of them back. He said the foals are needed to serve both domestic and international demand.

On the heels of this important industry-marking sale, it will be interesting to follow the western performance sales coming up this fall and see if our industry breeders have followed the lead of the Thoroughbred breeders.

Photo courtesy Keeneland

Quick stats:

– average price of $102,220 rose 17 percent from $87,330 in 2012. It is the highest average since 2006 and the third-highest September Sale average ever.

– median surged to a record $50,000, up 11.1 percent from last year’s $45,000.

– gross sales of $280,491,300, the highest since 2008.

– 18 yearlings sold for $1 million or more, the most since 2008.

~ with files from Keeneland and Bloodhorse.com

NRHA's Newest 4 Million Dollar Sire

Colonels Smoking Gun NRHA Gunner

Colonels Smoking Gun, AKA Gunner.

The National Reining Horse Association (NRHA) has just released their newest addition to the elite group of Four Million Dollar Sires, is Colonels Smoking Gun, (also known as Gunner). As mentioned in their press release, the Hall of Fame inductee, Gunner (AQHA Colonels Smoking Gun, APHA Colonels Smokingun) has soared from NRHA Three to Four Million Dollar Sire status in less than a year due to the overwhelming success of his progeny. As of September 12, 2012, the NRHA records document Gunner’s official offspring NRHA Lifetime Earnings are $4,009,637.

According to the NRHA Gunner, was bred by Eric Storey, Henagar, Ala., and is the top NRHA earning offspring of Colonelfourfreckle (Colonel Freckels x Miss Solano). The outstanding 1993 stallion is out of the mare Katie Gun, who’s offspring have earned more than $510,000 in NRHA earnings. McQuay Stables, Inc. (NRHA Two Million Dollar Rider and One Million Dollar Owner Tim McQuay and wife Colleen) currently owns and stands the stallion in Tioga, Tex. Gunner earned nearly $175,000 in his career and was inducted into the NRHA Hall of Fame in 2003 in recognition of his contributions to the sport of Reining. His accolades include:

– 1996 NRHA Futurity Level 4 Open Reserve Champion ridden by Clint Haverty
– 1997 NRHA Derby Level 4 Non Pro finalist ridden by Kim Sloan
– 1998 NRBC Level 4 Open Reserve Champion ridden by Clint Haverty
– 1998 NRHA Derby Level 4 Open finalist ridden by Clint Haverty
– 2001 USET Festival Of Champions National Reining Champion ridden by Bryant Pace
– In 2002, Gunner was immortalized as a Breyer Horse for the USET Special Edition model.

“We are lucky to have Gunner as part of our family at McQuay Stables and naturally are thrilled at his rapid growth in earnings. Our sincere thanks to all the owners and trainers that support him,” said Tim and Colleen McQuay stated to the NRHA after learning of this achievement.

A Broodmare Takes on Two

Doug and Sherry Webster

Misty, Gracie and Dolly ~ Robyn Louise Photography

Doug and Sherry Webster of Quesnel, BC run a cow/calf operation on Sunnyside Ranch, a 1400 acre family owned operation established in 1891.  As far back as Doug can remember the Webster’s have raised horses that carry the original heart brand.  A good hand, Doug trains horses for use on the ranch and outside sales, as well as a few that daughter Racheal barrel races.  The Webster stock bloodlines include Two Eyed Jack, Wright a Chex and Peppy San Badger.

Doug was born and raised on the ranch and after living in town for the first eight years of their marriage, the Webster’s returned to the ranch in 1989 when Doug’s father was diagnosed with cancer.

“This is where Doug’s heart is” Sherry says.

Doug and Sherry Webster ~ Gordon Perry photo

Doug and Sherry Webster ~ Gordon Perry photo

This unusual story began on May 25th when Sherry walked up to the top field to check on their band of broodmares and saw what she at first thought was a set of twins nursing on their mother.

Sherry posted a picture on her facebook page showing a grey mare with a sorrel foal nursing on one side and a dark colored foal nursing on the other side. Curious after seeing the pictures of Misty and the two foals, I asked Sherry to tell me their story.

“It’s a hard story to tell, because we are not too sure what happened. Misty has always been the mother hen of the broodmares. Whenever a mare foals, she is usually hanging around, checking things out and acting protective. I walked up on the evening of May 25th to check on the mares and I saw two new babies suckling on Misty. At first I did think they were twins, but something didn’t seem right. On further examination, I realized a younger mare Katy (first time mama) had foaled, but she was showing no interest in either of the two foals.

Doug and I brought them down and separated them, hoping Katy would take hers. We tried for three days and she fought the whole three days! Katy had lost an eye as a yearling, and every time that filly came up on her blind side, she would kick it. We spent three days twitching her and trying other methods to get Katy to accept her filly, but with no success. Katy wanted nothing to with her foal. Doug decided to see if Misty would take the foal back and she was warmly accepted. The two fillies also seem to share a special bond, as they are inseparable.”

Gracie and Dolly . ~ Photo by Sherry Webster

Following mom’s example, Gracie and Dolly check out the feed trough. ~ Photo by Sherry Webster

“The fillies really love their grain! They have separation anxiety when they are apart from each other. You know when a foal becomes separated from their mama, how they whinny? It’s the same way with these two girls. One day the two of them got separated from each other in the barn, was it ever funny! I think we will have our hands full with these two!”

Sometimes a maiden mare will reject a foal, especially if a more dominant mare attempts to “steal” the newborn. Katy may have been confused by the foaling process and didn’t have time to develop her maternal instincts before Misty took over. No matter what caused the situation, the combined family of three seem healthy and happy, an outcome the Webster’s are grateful for.

Daughter Racheal poses with the extended family ~ Robyn Louise Photography

Daughter Racheal poses with the extended family ~ Robyn Louise Photography

“Smiles” for the camera ~ Robyn Louise Photography

“Smiles” for the camera ~ Robyn Louise Photography

Quarter Horse Industry Breeding Seminar

Deanna Buschert Photography

Breeding the Fastest Horse, an industry seminar to be hosted by the Quarter Horse Racing Industry Development Program (QHRIDP) has been rescheduled to Saturday, November 26th at the Ajax Convention Centre.

“The Program has received very positive feedback on the seminar agenda and the guest speakers who will be presenting,” said Program Coordinator Sandy Anthony. “We are very pleased to have as a speaker Dan Lucas, the leading Quarter Horse breeder in North America.” The date and location of the seminar has been changed in order to maximize attendance, both from breeders within the Quarter Horse racing industry and from breeders new to, or curious about, breeding for the Quarter Horse programs.

Seminar will be held at: Ajax Convention Centre
550 Beck Cres Ajax, ON L1Z 1C9
905-428-9993

Date: Saturday, November 26th, 2011
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Topics will include:

· Planned breeding, herd improvement and crosses that work for racing;
· Herd management practices to improve conception and increase the chances of full-term pregnancy;
· Factors affecting fertility and early conception in the broodmare;
· Herd management practices to improve the chance of full-term pregnancy
· Marketing stallions
· Breeding racehorses for the Ontario racing programs.

The Quarter Horse Racing Industry Development Program is administered by the Ontario Racing Commission. For information on other initiatives supported by the Program, please visit the Quarter Horse section of the Ontario Racing Commission website at www.ontarioracingcommission.ca

A full agenda for the seminar is available upon request. Registration for the seminar is required. The cost to attend is $39.00. To register please contact:
Sandy Anthony
Program Coordinator
416-213-0520
qhprogram@ontarioracingcommission.ca