Western Wedding – Douglas Lake Ranch

A beautifully styled wedding set at the historic Douglas Lake Ranch.

Jacobs---couple1

Their story: Tina Stone grew up on Vancouver Island, a long way from Douglas Lake Ranch. But rodeo and ranch life drew the B.C. girl to the stunning rolling hills, and in 2003, she took a job on the illustrious ranch. Little did she know that’s where she would find the person she would begin to share her life with 10 years later.

Cameron Jacobs is the son of Stan Jacobs, well-known cow boss of Douglas Lake Ranch. Born in Merritt, British Columbia, and guided by his father, Cameron spent his entire childhood cowboying.

When the two met during the first week of Stone being employed at the ranch, her first reaction was hesitant.

“I remember thinking, ‘Wow, he’s cute!’ But being that he was three years younger than me, I held my thoughts to myself. After about a year of being close friends, it wasn’t too long until he had me convinced that he was worth it!”

The next eight and a half years took them on some great adventures. They had a stint living in nearby Kelowna; they spent two months in Oklahoma while Cameron attended horseshoeing school; they lived in Alberta, working and making new friends; then ended up back home in Douglas Lake. After that many years and that many miles, Stone knew that Jacobs was what she wanted.

“Finally, he took me for a picnic lunch at Quilchena Falls and popped the question. Then it all began. I had waited a very long time for this moment, I wasn’t waiting any longer, so I decided to plan our wedding in four months. He proposed on May 25th and we were married September 14th. There were some crazy times but it all came together . . . and I couldn’t have asked for a more perfect day.”

Jacobs---bride

Dress: Bought at Viva Bridal in nearby Kamloops, Tina's dress was a beautiful fit and flare with a sweetheart neckline. It was made from a 'romantique' colored satin under an ivory lace overlay with a gorgeous matching belt that added a little bling. Perhaps her favorite part was the stunning nine-foot, satin edged vail. Bridesmaids: Trina's ladies wore locally sourced 'rosewood' coloured dresses from David's Bridal, accented by great boots. Their jewelry was handmade by one of the bridesmaids, adding the perfect personal touch.

Dress: Bought at Viva Bridal in nearby Kamloops, Tina’s dress was a beautiful fit and flare with a sweetheart neckline. It was made from a ‘romantique’ colored satin under an ivory lace overlay with a gorgeous matching belt that added a little bling. Perhaps her favorite part was the stunning nine-foot, satin edged vail.

Jacobs---couple

Bridesmaids: Trina’s ladies wore locally sourced ‘rosewood’ coloured dresses from David’s Bridal, accented by great boots. Their jewelry was handmade by one of the bridesmaids, adding the perfect personal touch.

Jacobs---ceremony

Men’s Attire: Cameron, along with the other guys in the bridal party, sported unwashed Wranglers with ivory shirts and grey vests from Moores Mens Wear. The groom and the best man wore a paisley tie, setting them apart from the others, who wore burgundy. Cameron’s western inspired jacket was lent to them by a friend for the big day.

Jacobs---groomsmen

Boots: Nothing less than Macie Beans for the bride.

Make-up: Trina enlisted the talents of Sheeradiance Salon, based in Kamloops, for a flawless face.

Cake: The beautiful western-inspired cake was homemade by Courtney Brewer, a young girl was also resides on Douglas Lake Ranch.

Jacobs---rings

Favours: Trina and Cameron’s favours were little white buckets with a hand written date and names, penned by Trina’s mother. They were filled with a little candy, and could also be topped off at the candy bar.

Jacobs---favours

Flowers: Only $160 was enough to deck out the wedding with stunning flowers, which included calla lilies and gerbera daisies.

Jacobs---wedding-party

Date: September 14, 2013

Photographer: Captured Moments Lifestyle Photography and Design

Ceremony Location: Douglas Lake Ranch, British Columbia

Reception Location: Salmon Lake Resort

New Equine Events for Calgary Stampede

Arabian Horse Association Region 17 Championship covers every aspect of Arabian horse use and competition, from reining to English Pleasure, and Western to Arabic dress. Photo by Tex Cam.

Arabian Horse Association Region 17 Championship covers every aspect of Arabian horse use and competition, from reining to English Pleasure, and Western to Arabic dress. Photo by Tex Cam.

For year-round excitement, just add horsepower! The Calgary Stampede is thrilled to welcome four major horse events to their new home, the nearly-constructed Agrium Western Event Centre. Each event will draw new participants and visitors to the heart of Calgary from across Western Canada to enjoy top horses and riders in action. Collectively, the events will add to the reputation of Stampede Park as a year-round gathering place.

When we embarked on this journey to build Canada’s premiere agriculture showcase space, these are the types of events we envisioned – big national and international shows that will connect the country to the city and draw guests to Calgary,” says Max Fritz, director of agriculture and western events for the Stampede. “We designed the building to meet their needs and to create exceptional experiences for participants, animals and guests.”

The following four events have signed multi-year agreements with the Stampede to host their major shows and competitions at the Agrium Western Event Centre:

Arabian Horse Association Region 17 Championships

July 21 – 26, 2014

Arabian Horse Association Region 17’s Western Canadian Championships in July will draw up to 500 Arabian horse entries from across the West and even some U.S. competitors. This spectator-friendly event showcases these beautiful horses and riders in the full spectrum of event disciplines. Website: http://www.region17.com/

Team Roping Canada, Canadian Finals

September 26 – 28, 2014

Expecting 1,200 to 1,400 teams and up to 2,500 spectators, Team Roping Canada’s Canadian Finals will feature ropers of all ages, from eight to 80 years old. This is the culmination of their association’s season, which spans the summer months and features professional, open, amateur, junior and shoot-out classes. Website: http://www.teamropingcanada.com/index.htm#

Canadian Team Cattle Penning Association National Finals

October 9 – 14, 2014

The National Finals for the Canadian Team Cattle Penning Association brings together to up to 1,200 teams of three each, and an estimated 2,500 spectators to fill the stands and cheer them on. Competitors in this championship event come from across Western Canada and many U.S. states, including California, Montana, Texas, Oklahoma and Washington, all in the hunt for an estimated $285,000 in prize money. Website: http://canadianpenning.com

Royal West, produced by Rocky Mountain Show Jumping

October 23 – November 1, 2014

The Royal West is an all-new 10-day multi-breed show, offering Western Canadian riders an alternative, and prelude to the Royal Show in Toronto. Royal West will feature a division for international show jumpers, national hunter/jumper classes, hackney and heavy horse classes, and a multitude of other events including indoor eventing, terrier racing, barrel racing and even mutton-busting. Website: http://rmshowjumping.com/

Jordan Dodds  and Heeler Clark McCarroll team up to showcase the fast-paced sport of team roping in the summer of 2013. Photo by Mike Copeman, courtesy of Calgary Stampede.

Jordan Dodds and Heeler Clark McCarroll team up to showcase the fast-paced sport of team roping in the summer of 2013. Photo by Mike Copeman, courtesy of Calgary Stampede.

Agrium Western Event Centre

Agriculture is at the heart of the Calgary Stampede and the expansion activities underway with the Agrium Western Event Centre will provide a new focal point for agricultural events on Stampede Park.

One of the largest projects in our 100-year history, the Agrium Western Event Centre is a state-of-the-art facility for western events and agriculture education, exhibition and industry in southern Alberta. Designed to form a lasting connection between urban and rural communities, it will host an engaging, globally-focused educational program called Journey 2050, and it will play a central role in making the Calgary Stampede a year-round gathering place.

The Agrium Western Event Centre will be the new home for agricultural events on Stampede Park, hosting both regional and international competition, convention rodeos, and trade shows. The facility will include a 250’x150′ ft. show floor and 31,250 sq. ft. of clear-span space. It will also feature a 20,000 sq. ft. multipurpose hall, designed for competition, warm-up, trade shows, or exhibitions, as well as a magnificent 8,000 sq. ft. rotunda and entranceway.

Cattle Penning National Championships are returning to downtown Calgary each October at the nearly-completed Agrium Western Event Centre at Stampede Park. Photo courtesy of Calgary Stampede.

Cattle Penning National Championships are returning to downtown Calgary each October at the nearly-completed Agrium Western Event Centre at Stampede Park. Photo courtesy of Calgary Stampede.

Features in brief

250′ x 125′ Show Arena:

– Large arena for events that require the space, such show jumping, dressage and barrel racing, or to run simultaneous events within the same arena

– Allows events like team penning plenty of arena performance area with staging space alongside

– Arena seating for 3,200 including VIP suites, and stands with the right pitch for spectators wearing cowboy hats

– Concourse is fully open to main arena, ensuring great sight-lines throughout while accessing food and exhibits

20,000 sq. ft. Multi-purpose hall:

– Offers warm-up arena adjacent to main performance arena, can be used for smaller separate events or trade shows to accompany arena events

– Enables smaller events to stage their shows at the Agrium Western Event Centre and then grow their events to the size that merit booking the large arena

Animal-friendly features:

– livestock pens and traffic areas under stands instead of through performance arena

– adjacent multi-purpose warm-up arena with performance dirt and same-level ground throughout for optimal livestock and horse footing

– outside building roof overhangs to protect penned livestock from sun and rain

– direct access for participants and livestock to barn stalls through a no-traffic area

– Links with other Stampede developments to serve participants, including new bigger tunnel to infield livestock trailer parking, 1,200 additional stalls, RV Parking with amenities and improved Christie Bridge back entrance

Scheduled for completion before the 2014 10-day Stampede, the Agrium Western Event Centre will be an important milestone in the Calgary Stampede’s vision of becoming a world-class, year-round gathering place. The key sponsor, Agrium, along with the governments of Alberta and Canada, has been instrumental in helping the Stampede elevate its agriculture and outreach programs by creating this world-class facility.

Education will play a pivotal role in the legacy of the Agrium Western Event Centre. The building’s rotunda will be the home of the Journey 2050 program – an inquiry-based educational experience for Calgary-and-area middle school children. This world-class program will challenge students to sustainably feed the world’s nine billion people by 2050 in a fun and interactive way.

Show jumping returns to the heart of Calgary after a 30-year absence. Photo courtesy of Rocky Mountain Show Jumping.

Show jumping returns to the heart of Calgary after a 30-year absence. Photo courtesy of Rocky Mountain Show Jumping.

One of the most ambitious capital projects in the Stampede’s history, the Agrium Western Event Centre is an ultra-modern centerpiece for western events and agriculture education, exhibition and industry in southern Alberta. Slated to open in June of 2014, it is unique in Canada, creating 150,000 square feet of dedicated livestock-friendly space. The building’s key sponsor, Agrium, along with the governments of Alberta and Canada, has been instrumental in helping the Stampede elevate its agriculture and outreach programs by creating this world-class facility.

We’re thrilled to preview these four exciting horse events that will bring this building to life year-round. We’re looking forward to securing other major livestock and horse shows,” says Fritz. “Our ultimate goal is that regional residents, tourists and guests can enjoy western events, horses and livestock in the heart of Calgary most weeks of the year.”

Lorne Robertson of the Arabian Horse Association Region 17 says having a specialized agricultural arena in a major destination city will help grow their event. “Our Arabian horse championships are very colourful, elegant and formal events. Our horses are our primary focus, and our riders and trainers have confidence in the top- notch footing and facilities that have been custom-designed for the best care of our horses,” says Robertson. “We’re also hearing excitement from members because Calgary is a great destination city and they’re planning site-seeing activities around their visit.”

The unique features of the Agrium Western Event Centre convinced John Anderson of Rocky Mountain Show Jumping that Calgary is the right location for his show. Anderson is launching an all-new, ambitious 10-day show jumping and horse extravaganza in late October of 2014, called Royal West. Designed to provide Western Canadian show jumpers a prelude or alternative to the Toronto-based Royal Show, Royal West will showcase hunter-jumper classes plus a full spectrum of other events such as barrel racing, heavy horse shows and terrier racing.

I’ve always wanted to do something like this. Now this large arena and all the dedicated facilities make it possible,” says Anderson, who explains show jumping requires more space than standard arenas would provide, with careful attention to proper footing and warm-up areas.

Size and specialized facilities drew the Canadian Team Cattle Penning Association back to the Stampede after several years in other venues. Their championships finals draw up to 1,200 team entries with many as 2,500 spectators in the stands.

Agrium Western Event Centre is an ideal set-up for us,” says Kent Hillard, vice-president of the association. “Adjacent warm-up and staging spaces ensure the horses and riders can warm up, stand by to watch cattle and then jump into the action fully warmed up. The livestock stalls for pens of cattle right under the stands make for quick transitions between pens. The audience is going to love this modern arena because they can see the action from anywhere, even on the concourse, and won’t have to take their cowboy hats off sitting in the stands.”

Art Gallais, manager of Team Roping Canada, likens the Agrium Western Event Centre to the top facilities in Las Vegas where the world roping series are held. He says the building design is not only ideal for smooth operation of his event, but he adds the open concourse and VIP suites in the arena allows for valuable sponsorship exposure and experiences, which will help attract more sponsors to grow Team Roping Canada’s National Finals.

About the Calgary Stampede

As we enter our second century, the Calgary Stampede celebrates the people, the animals, the land, the traditions and the values that make up the unique spirit of the west. The Calgary Stampede contributes to the quality of life in Calgary and southern Alberta through our world-renowned 10-day Stampede, year-round facilities, western events and several youth and agriculture programs. Exemplifying the theme: We’re Greatest Together, we are a volunteer-supported, not-for-profit community organization that preserves and promotes western heritage and values. All revenue is reinvested into Calgary Stampede programs and facilities.

4 Weeks ’till Christmas: Great Gift Ideas

It’s only a few days until the beginning of December, and at the log house, the preoccupation with Christmas decorating has come into full swing. Here’s how it goes: tubs of ornaments, glass balls, antiques and rustic stuff is hauled out of storage – we ponder it all and then take to the outdoors to cut the boughs, dig up the pinecones, wrestle pots, pails from their frozen beds and retrieve the well rusted horseshoes from the fences they’ve been resting on all summer and fall. Then we mix it all together to create our own version of country Christmas. Along the way, we create a few ornaments and greenery arrangements to give to friends. Because of their western touches, these often turn out to be some of my most loved gifts.

This year I’ve been gathering inspiration all year at the Western Christmas board at the magazine’s Pinterest page. Here’s a bit of inspiration for you.

4weeksbootarrangementIn the boot genre, try filling an old pair with greenery and a few ornaments . . .

4weeksccbootAttach a boot to a door or wall, fill it with decorations and greenery.

4weeksbootlightsOr, drape a string of lights, in and around a pair and set on a ledge. . .

4weekswreathWreaths provide a perfect attachable canvas for horseshoes, old tack and in this case, baler twine.

4weekshorseshoetreeHorseshoes find a great repurpose around here in wreaths, mantles and centrepieces, but here’s an idea we haven’t thought of yet, a horseshoe tree!

4weekshorseshoeornamentHorseshoe ornaments are easy to put together with a bit of glue and greenery.

4weeksbigornamentTake it one step further and create a bit ornament!

4weeksbwornamentEven I’m handy enough to bend old barb wire and turn it into a beautiful keepsake to attach to gifts or hang on the tree.

4weekslanternlightYou might need someone handy with electrical work to complete this project, stuff a string of lights into an old lantern and wire it up to warm up a front entrance or mud room.

4weekspoletreeA simple arrangement for a front gate or driveway.

4weeksrakeornamentRepurposing an old garden rake with pretty glass bulbs.

4weeksbarrelChristmas in a barrel with a Texas star touch.

4weekscalfpailOr, in an old pail – this one reminds me of the calf feeding pails we employed regularly at our farm.

4weekssimplearrangmenetOld containers hold so much character, and with a few candles and greenery make a beautiful and rustic centrepiece. For more ideas in this vein, have a look at this autumn centrepiece. 

4weekssmalltreearrangementSet a number of small containers together and stuff them with greenery from your shelter belt.

4weekswesternvignetteCreate an entire simple and soft coloured vignette with the simplest of items. Add lights.

4weekslariatwreathFinally, a lariat door wreath great for a barn or shop door.

For more western decorating ideas, visit the Western Christmas board at the Western Horse Review Pinterest Page. (You’ll also find the links for the sources for the photos I’ve employed here.)

4weekscavaliaAND – we’re giving away two tickets to Cavalia’s new production, Odysseo, soon to open in Vancouver, B.C.! All you have to do to be entered in the draw is comment below on what your favourite application of western, as depicted in the pictures above, is, or just mention one of your own.

To receive a double entry into the contest, just head over to the Western Horse Review Facebook Page, and enter there as well.

6 weeks ’till Christmas: Great Gift Ideas

I haven’t always been a fan of cowhide, perhaps because I haven’t had the vision for it into the decor of the log house. Cowhide placemats and runners have just never really taken my fancy. Pinterest has changed all of that and really popped open my eyes to the endless possibilities of cowhide. I’ve grown to love the idea of it so much, I’m venturing a guess that one or two of the people on my Christmas list will be receiving it in one form or another.

If you’re looking for a lifetime gift for the people who share your home, or a unique western-styled option for the urbanites in your life, here’s a selection of uses of cowhide to inspire.

Cowhide is a thought of as a traditional western accent, but with it’s organic elements of hide, hair and colour, it transfers easily into modern spaces.

Decorators know a cool thing when they see it, but I hadn’t ever thought of putting a cow hide in the bathroom. Is it even practical? Will it stand up to the inevitable water splashes?

Ever more daring, how about a bathtub encased in cowhide? So much warmth in the combination of wood grain, browns and hide.

Cowhide on white plank floor is a favourite for me, especially pulling together this minimal look. . .

. . .  or adding warmth and style to an office.

Boho chic gets a boost of Wild west with a cowhide.

No need to go for the whole rug, opt instead for a piece of furniture, like this award-winning coffee-table design.

Cool and chic chairs and ottoman. . .

. . . or these full loungers, really spectacular pieces.

Why not just drape your entire staircase in chocolate brown sensory overload? This one captures my vote.

There’s also a plethora of smaller decor items in cowhide such as mirror frames, lampshades and pillows.

These carry-ons are neat statements of your love of the West. And wine :).

And finally, what speaks of your love of the West more than a stocking crafted of cowhide.

Turns out the Wild West is alive and well in places modern, not  traditional western homes. If I’ve tweaked the idea of adding cowhide (or more cowhide!) to your decor, you can find much more of it at our Make Mine Cowhide Pinterest board, where we’ve amassed a small collection of all things cowhide. (You’ll also find the links for the sources for the photos I’ve employed here.)

Belt by Paige Albrecht. Skull by Dylan Callaghan. Photo by Krista Kay.

For the love of all things cowhide, we’re giving away this gorgeous cowhide belt by our friend and artisan, Paige Albrecht. All you have to do to be entered in the draw is comment below on what your favourite application of cowhide, as depicted in the pictures above, is, or just choose one of your own.

I nearly forgot to mention, to receive a double entry into the contest, just head over to the Western Horse Review Facebook Page, and enter there as well. Happy Friday!

Artisans of the West – Shelagh Blatz

Shelagh Blatz, silversmith and owner of Designs By Shelagh.

Our March 2013 issue featured the Ultimate Artisans of the West. Over the next few months, we'll profile some of the talented artisans we met and whose work we fell in love. To see the full feature, order the back issue

Stamped Sterling Silver surrounds this 1930's Buffalo nickel, the iconic symbol of the West, surrounded by turquoise stones. Complimented by matching beads.

Shelagh Blatz “fell” into silversmithing. After convincing some friends to take an Introduction to Silversmithing class with her in Okotoks, Alberta, Blatz fell in love with the craft. She continued to take classes from her mentor, Shirley Paradis, and also at the Alberta College of Art & Design.

In 2002, Blatz started making pieces that she couldn’t find anywhere in Canada and began taking orders from people who were interested in her unique pieces. Working out of her home studio on her family’s ranch southwest of Calgary, Blatz draws motivation for her jewelry from her western lifestyle – she strives to create unique pieces that reflect her life.

A beautiful grouping in striking Spiny Oyster, a shell that has been used for adornment since ancient times and worn by Aztecs, Anasazi, Mogolion and Hohokam.

“I draw a lot of inspiration directly from the stone; the color and shape usually indicate where I start with the design,” says Blatz. “I start with a sketch book and a shape and fit a stone into the design or sometimes I begin with a stone and draw the design around it.”

Blatz finishes all of her designs off with her trademark Buffalo nickel clasp. “It’s great to be able to pick out one of my creations from afar.”

A striking turquoise stone surrounded by small beads of silver and on a silver beaded chain.

Suspended on a silver chain, and adorned with a light turquoise stone, this feather is light and easy to wear.

Silver feathers adorned with precious stone, and complimentary earrings.

Visit Designs By Shelagh to see more of Blatz's work.

~ by Deanna Beckley

 

Spectacular Western Weddings Part III

Published in the January/ February 2012 edition of Western Horse Review.

BY DAINYA SAPERGIA & DEANNA BECKLEY

A western wedding exhibits ample opportunities for stunning and expressive photography. With blossoming western culture molding beauty and elegance with tradition, the choices for modern day brides and grooms are endless. Here’s one of three weddings we featured in the Jan/Feb, 2012 issue of Western Horse Review.

Brook McGovern & Clint Buhler

western weddings cowboy cowgirl wedding

Being avid horsepeople and team ropers, it was important that their horses be included in Brook and Clint’s day. Photo by Krista Kay Photography.

Venue: A photographer’s dream, Manning Park provided the ultimate in stunning backdrops, for western wedding photographer, Krista Kay. The couple chose dramatic the Park as the setting for their vows. The ceremony was held at Lightning Lake, and the dinner was hosted in the Cascade Room of the Pinewoods Lodge, also located in Manning Park. For dancing and festivities, the wedding migrated to the Bears Den Pub where they danced the rest of the night away.

Colour Scheme: Simple and elegant, with chocolate brown and black.

Jewelry: A simply stated Victorian-esque necklace with a tear drop design adorned Brook’s neck. For a very personal touch, Clint had Brook’s platinum engagement and wedding rings designed especially for her, and Brook chose a strong carbine tungsten band for Clint, inscribed with the promise “Will Love You Forever.”

Men’s Attire: Clint and the groomsmen wore black western influenced blazers, crisp white collared shirts, dark wash jeans, black hats and brown boots.

Ladies’ Attire: The bridesmaids pulled in the chocolate brown element with their cotton halter dresses with brown cowboy boots. The two flower girls looked pristine in white ‘princess’ dresses accented with a wide brown sash and cowboy boots.

western weddings cowboy romance

A bit of magic from Brook and Clint’s engagement photo session. Photo by Krista Kay Photography.

Wedding Dress: Keeping her outdoor plans in mind, Brook went with a hardy taffeta material that would easily shed dirt and grasses which could cling and snag traditional materials. It was a princess ball gown, with a modest train and a beautiful back. Knowing that the ceremony would involve horses, she made sure it had plenty of body and flowed nicely when she was riding.

Flowers: Brook chose Abby Florist of Abbotsford, British Columbia to create her unique arrangements. Wanting something completely different, she went with fresh white roses, and accented with white gerbera daisies, dried grasses and wheat.

Centerpieces: The tables were adorned with a clear glass votive holder with a rose set in pebbles underwater and a tea light floating in the center. Spread throughout the center of the table were dried leaves to tie in the strong outdoor presence laced through the day.

Favours: Tying in Clint’s profession as a farrier along with a shot of whimsy, Brook chose a pony shoe with fine wire for a hanger, making a unique and useable momento for guests to remember the day. Cake. Personal and simple, the cake was a small nineinch round carrot cake (Clint’s favourite), decorated with a pretty paisley pattern.

Something Borrowed: Brook filled the old adage “something blue” with a blue garter. Also hidden under her beautiful gown was “something borrowed” – her mother’s garter.

Last year we featured three western weddings for readers to derive inspiration from for their upcoming nuptials. This year is no different! You are going to want to pick up the Jan/Feb issue of Western Horse Review, or purchase the current issue online

Southwest Style

I like to think we have plenty of cowboy and country style back home, but when we’re here in Arizona I really look forward to a day or two of southwest shopping. One of our favorite places is only a few minutes away in the quaint western town of Cave Creek, where, over the past three years, I’ve come to be drawn to a few favorite places. Such as Valerie’s Furniture where an eclectic selection of cowboy culture to western chic can be found.

You’ll find a strong influence of a southern style essential – the cross – in this store.

Whether in jewellery or ornaments, crosses and turquoise just work together, don’t they?

Mexicana Rose is one of the newest shops on Cave Creek Road, and with weekly containers arriving from their factory location in Mexico, we’re now able to appreciate and see some of the best of Mexico style in this store.

Artwork, pottery, lamps and furniture, such as this reclaimed wood sideboard I fell in love with on our last trip, are staples of this store,which now sprawls over two buildings.

As, are accessories with Mexican detail. . . .

. . . and iron work and tapestries.

Mexican culture often expresses it’s artistry in religious elements. Among my latest obsession – the folk-art like retablos. These are small oil paintings or sculptures on tin, wood, or copper – traditionally displayed on home alters to express devotion to (often) Catholic saints. Nowadays, they are considered collectable pieces of art. I found this one at one of our favorite consignment store stops in Cave Creek – the Lazy Lizard. A wonderful store, filled with cowboy culture, Mexican and western style pieces and charming purveyors. Not to mention – great deals!

A few other favorites – pretty ceramic bird found at Valeries.

This blue chair, modern sleekness with western undertones in the stitching and leather, found at the recently expanded True West Design, now occupying a gorgeous building on Cave Creek Road.

And conveniently located across the street from the Dairy Queen, Wee would add. When she’s not devouring strawberry-marshmallow sundaes and a large order of fries, I can sometimes cajole her into modelling for me (mostly out of boredom, on her part).

This rather interesting armchair that Wee is settin’ upon would make most of my female friends recoil in horror, but I can think of a guy or two who just might treasure it. I would suggest it is very likely one of a kind and for a limited time, or perhaps even a very long time (smile), you can find it at the Red Truck Trading Company.

While still incorporating two man-cave essentials – hide and horn – I sense this bench might enjoy better odds of getting the nod from the opposite gender.

And what would a man-cave be without a guitar or two in the shadows?

We found these beautiful Spanish-style bottles at Valerie’s.

Vintage cowgirl graphics and motifs are resplendent in many items, such as this pillow. . .

. . . or, this Andy-Warhol inspired lampshade, paired with an industrial-type base.

Cowgirl humor, particularly when it pokes a bit of fun at the opposite gender, appears to be universally in style.

What about this western-inspired trash can, found at Big Bronco, a western store popular with tourists.

Or, this Navajo-patterned table runner and pot.

And, finally, I loved these bowls which embody the classic southwestern colors of turquoise, red and earthy browns.

So, I’m curious. What piece pictured in this post tweaked your fancy most? Let me know in the comment section below. Later this week, I’m pulling out two names from all of the comments, and sending each of them a Horse Savvy Annual Planner. These planners are one of the most useful equine record books you’ll ever handle, so be sure to have a chance to win one with your comment!

Wedding Bliss