Fireside Trout

This beautiful trout recipe is so easy to cook and a wonderful way to enjoy the outdoors. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography

By Chef Mike Edgar

This Rainbow Trout dish is best enjoyed next to the fire with your favourite people and a setting sun. Fireside Trout Pouches go amazingly well with Fennel Roast Baby Potatoes and Bannock on a Stick. Make these recipes over the campfire on your next trail ride and it’s a trip no one will forget!

Trout Pouches
 
INGREDIENTS:
6 Whole, Deboned Rainbow Trout (Roughly, two pounds each)
1 Package Fresh Cherry Tomatoes
250 Grams Whole Olives
1/2 Pound Sliced Butter
4 Lemons Sliced
Fresh Basil
Fresh Parsley
Salt 
Pepper
6 Large Sheets Tinfoil
18 Slices Sliced Pancetta
2 Bulbs Fresh Fennel
2 Pounds Baby Potatoes
24 Fresh Clams
 
Pancetta Method:
In a cast iron, pan fry the pancetta until crispy. Set aside for garnish.

These roasted fennel baby potatoes are a delicious and hearty side-dish, cooked easily over a grill. Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

Fennel Roast Baby Potatoes Method:
Cut potatoes in half and boil in water for five minutes to soften them up. Remove from water and set aside. Slice your fennel as thin as you can and sauté over medium heat in butter or oil in a cast iron pan. When the fennel starts to caramelize, add the potatoes and another tablespoon of butter or oil, cover and continue to cook. Stir often until potatoes are nicely roasted and fennel is sweet and crunchy – approximately 20 minutes. Wrap in a tinfoil pouch and set aside to reheat.
 
Trout Method:
To begin, cut your sheets of tinfoil to make your pouches. Place lemon slices and fresh torn herbs down first. Season the trout inside and out with salt and pepper, stuff with some herbs and some lemon slices. Place two to three slices of butter over the trout. Add four tomatoes, four olives and four clams.

Fold the tinfoil around everything to make a sealed pouch. Ensure there are no leaks and is everything is sealed, (you can always wrap a second tinfoil sheet around if need be.) Place your pouches either next to the fire as close to the heat as possible, or over the fire on a grill. Depending on the heat of your fire, the trout should take no more than 20 minutes to cook. Flip the pouches every five minutes. Make sure you put your pouch of fennel potatoes on the fire as well to heat up again!
 
Open your pouches. If you feel that your fish needs more time, just wrap it back up and put back on the heat. Discard any clams that have not opened. Top your trout with chopped parsley and basil, the crispy pancetta and a drizzle of olive oil. Place your potatoes around the trout and dig in.

Bannock on a stick is a great recipe to enjoy with kids! Photo by Twisted Tree Photography.

Bannock on a Stick
 
INGREDIENTS:
1 Cup Flour
1 Tsp. Baking Powder
1/4 Tsp. Salt
2 Tbsp. Powdered Milk
1 Tbsp. Melted Butter
 
Once you have combined all the above ingredients and created your dough, take the dough and role into a long thin shape. Start wrapping the dough around a carefully chosen stick, (an ideal stick is one that would work for cooking hot dogs or marshmallows over a fire.) As you wrap, spiral the dough down down the stick and compress and spread it, so the dough is half-an-inch thick.
 
The inside of the dough needs to cook before the outside over-cooks. Therefore, you need to find the perfect distance from the fire. The best way to do this is to find a spot where you can hold your hand over the fire for 15 to 20 seconds.
 
Once you have found the perfect cooking spot, hold the bannock in place, rotating so all sides cook evenly. This should take 10 minutes. The dough should easily come off the stick when cooked. If it sticks, the dough is not cooked.
 
Serve with warm butter and jam of your choice.

Wojabi
 
Wojabi is an American Indian Berry sauce. You can use any mix of berries you like. For this recipe, w used Saskatoon berries and blueberries.
 
2 1/2 Cups of each Berry
1/2 Cup Water
1/2 Cup Honey
 
After washing your fruit, place all ingredients into a pot and mash with a fork or potato masher. Bring the mixture to a boil. Stir and reduce heat to a low simmer. Cook for an hour stirring occasionally so nothing burns. Let cool and enjoy! 

For some expert trail riding advice, check WHR’s recent article here. Photo by Monique Noble.

Centennial Buckle Means A Lot to Green

Courtesy of the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association

Saddle bronc rider, Layton Green, is hoping a big win at Falkland will propel his season forward. Photo Credit: Billie-Jean Duff/Roughstock Studio

Layton Green is hoping history might just repeat itself.

It was one year ago that the Meeting Creek, Alberta bronc rider rolled into Falkland on the May Long and left town a while later as the Falkland Stampede champion. But just as importantly, the Falkland win propelled the 23 year old talent to a phenomenal string of successes on both sides of the 49th parallel that resulted in Green eventually being crowned Canadian Champion and earning his first trip to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.
Fast forward one year and there was Green once again emerging with the Falkland bronc riding title after a standout 87.5 point effort aboard Northcott-Macza’s Honeymoon for $1417. But this one was maybe a bit more special as the win came with the 100th anniversary commemorative buckle the committee put up to celebrate its centennial edition.
“Yeah, that’s pretty cool,” Green reflected. “Anytime you win one of those anniversary rodeos it means a lot, especially when you think about the fact that you’re the only person who will ever have that buckle. It’s pretty exciting to win one like that.”
As for putting together another run like the 2017 roll he enjoyed, Green was very definite. “That’s my plan,” he stated. “After I won Falkland last year, I really started rolling from there. This is the time of the year I really love—the outdoor rodeos—I’m just getting warmed up. I’m really excited for the rest of the year.”
The reigning champion wasn’t the only repeat winner at Falkland. Barrel racer Shalayne Lewis of Vernon also went back to back, this time with a 16.658 second run to take home $1292.
Other Falkland 100th Anniversary Champions included Cadogan product Clint Laye in the bareback riding (87 points on Northcott-Macza’s Stevie Knicks for $1264), bull rider Austin Nash of Eckville (86 points on Northcott-Macza’s Crazy Wings for $1512); Cochrane’s Straws Milan whose 4.1 second run earned $1599; veteran Curtis Cassidy who posted a 9.0 run in the tie-down roping to come away with $1730 and the team roping duo of Brett Buss (Ponoka) and Kelly Buhler (Pritchard, BC) who topped the field with a 4.9 second run for $1213 each.
Milo, Alberta’s, Chett Deitz, earned 65 points and $256 to win the novice bareback riding championship; Ben Andersen (Eckville, AB) was 71 points for $303 to capture the novice saddle bronc riding title while in the steer riding it was Carter Sahli or Red Deer who scored 78.5 points for $302.64 and the win.
For complete Falkland Stampede results, go to rodeocanada.com
Next up on the CPRA schedule—a four event weekend with the Grande Prairie Stompede and Leduc Black Gold Rodeo both running from May 31 to June 3, the Wildwood Bronc Bustin June 2 and the Hand Hills Lake Stampede June 2-3.
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About the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association
The Canadian Professional Rodeo Association (CPRA) with headquarters in Airdrie, Alberta is the sanctioning body for professional rodeo in Canada. The CPRA approves over 50 events annually with a total payout exceeding $5.1 million. The organization holds the Grass Roots Final September 27-28 at Stampede Park in Calgary, Alberta and their premiere event – the Canadian Finals Rodeo (CFR) – at the ENMAX Centrium, Westerner Park in Red Deer, Alberta, October 30 – November 4. Follow the CPRA on Twitter and Instagram @prorodeocanada, ‘Like’ Canadian Professional Rodeo Association on Facebook or online at RodeoCanada.com.