Win Dinner With Amber Marshall

amber

Photo by Denise Grant.

Sometime in the spring of 2013, we undertook an ambitious endeavour and focused our editorial attention to the ernest task of finding 25 youth under the age of 25, who, in a nutshell, embodied and rang true to a modern Code of the West. We wanted young people who embraced independence, a love of the outdoor life, close connection to animals (in particular, horses), showed a fierce determination to follow their own path, buck convention, (and occasionally, conventional wisdom), and radiated all of these western measures of character through their daily lives.

As we worked our way down the long list, we were constantly reminded that the dreams often fostered in young minds and hearts can translate to adulthood, and that good old fashioned determination can still achieve what many think is impossible. We loved the true western code of ethic each of our top 25 exuded.

Included in that issue’s Top 25 Under 25 was the then 25-year-old Amber Marshall, star of the CBC hit television show, Heartland, a talented actress, who has managed to segue her passion for horses into a successful acting career.

Amber has been around horses as long as she can remember. She has been riding since a very young age and says that the two things she loves the most – acting and horses – have come together to create this dream role of Amy on the Heartland series.

In between filming and occupational commitments, Marshall lends her time and celebrity to a multitude of causes. Most recently she appeared with Niki Cammaert at Cowboys for Kingdom House, a fundraiser for special projects in Africa.

As Heartland films in Alberta, Marshall has made a home for herself on a small ranch outside of Calgary where she is surrounded by her many animals, including horses, dogs, cats, rabbits, chickens, turkeys and Jerseys. She stays true to her western roots and honours the people and animals around her while enjoying great professional successes. Grounded and focused, she is well on her way to creating a fulfilled, enriched life.

Her latest venture is partnering with Rustic Ranch, a furniture, home decor and gift store, located just 10 minutes north of Cross Iron Mills Mall, in Airdrie, Alberta. Located on the Giles family farm, the unique store shares a 30,000 square foot showroom with Airdrie Trailer Sales and Decked Out Vinyl, and specializes in log, reclaimed and rustic furniture and decor.

I’m pleased to let you know Rustic Ranch is offering you an opportunity to win a VIP evening with Amber Marshall!

Ballots are available in the store, and entries close on December 31.

Take the opportunity to meet Amber on November 1 when she’ll be in the store for a signing from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Perfect timing as Rustic Ranch’s yearly clearance sale is Oct. 31 to Nov. 2.

In the meantime catch up with Amber Marshall at her site, and view Rustic Ranch’s latest offerings at here.

Earl Bascom Honored On National Cowboy Day

earl1

Earl Bascom pictured with his bronze “Old Time Bronc Rider”

The name of an old time Canadian cowboy has been placed into the national spotlight.

Out of the many great cowboys and cowgirls from across America, the cowboy artist and rodeo champion Earl Bascom was chosen to be honored as part of the National Day of the Cowboy celebration.

The National Day of the Cowboy has been celebrated for the past ten years throughout North America. The commemoration is held annually on the fourth Saturday of July in honor of the cowboy and the cowboy way of life – cowboy culture.

Earl Bascom posthumously received the prestigious 2014 Cowboy Keeper Award in honor of his international contributions in the promotion and preservation of the pioneer and cowboy culture.

Bascom was born on a ranch in Utah but raised on a ranch in Canada.  His father John W. Bascom, was a true character of the Old West being a frontier lawman and rancher who furnished rodeo stock for local stampedes.

Cowboying and rodeoing was a way of life for Earl Bascom and his brothers Raymond, Melvin and Weldon.  They rodeoed throughout the west.

earl

Bascom rode saddle bronc at the 1932 Calgary Stampede

Earl Bascom competed in the three rough stock events of saddle bronc, bareback and bull riding. A rodeo pioneer often called the “Father of Modern Rodeo” and the “Father of Bareback Bronc Riding,” Earl Bascom is considered the world’s greatest inventor of rodeo equipment.

The rodeo equipment that Bascom designed and made includes the modern bareback rigging (1924), modern rodeo bronc saddle (1922) and the bucking chute (1919).  He and his brother Weldon produced a rodeo in Mississippi in 1935 which has been noted in rodeo history as the first night rodeo held outdoors under electric lights.

These rodeo innovations, all of which helped shape the sport of rodeo from its early beginnings, are still used today at rodeos around the world, almost 100 years later.

In 1933, Earl Bascom’s name was placed in the rodeo record books for setting a new world record time in the steer decorating event.

After graduating from the Brigham Young University with a degree in fine art, Bascom followed the example of his cousin Charles Russell and became an internationally known cowboy artist.  He spent the last years of his life recording his many cowboy experiences into works of art and bronze.

Bascom was declared by the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Artists Association to be the first professional rodeo cowboy to become a professional cowboy artist and sculptor.

earl3

“Broncs Wait For No Man”

During his art career, Bascom was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts of London, England, being the first cowboy to ever be so honored since the society’s beginning in 1754.

Earl Bascom even threw his hat into the Hollywood arena as an actor in the western movie “The Lawless Rider” and other film media, riding horseback alongside of the famous cowboy actor Roy Rogers.

When it comes to cowboy culture there probably is not anyone more cowboy than Earl Bascom.

During his lifetime he was an open-range cowboy, a bronc buster, cowpuncher, rodeo cowboy, rodeo champion, rodeo world record holder, rancher, trail drover, horse trainer, stagecoach driver, blacksmith, saddle maker, spur maker, bit maker, rodeo equipment designer, rodeo producer, rodeo announcer, rodeo clown and bull fighter, trick rider, freighter, wild horse chaser, dude wrangler, Hollywood western movie actor, as well as a cowboy artist and sculptor.

He took part in cattle drives out of the Canadian Rocky Mountains and across the Texas plains, drove bands of horses through the Teton Mountains, over Milk River Ridge and along Kicking Horse Creek in Montana.

“Once when I was working on the 5H Ranch outside of Lethbridge, I helped in the gathering of horses off the Canadian prairie.  7,000 horses were gathered all in one bunch a mile wide.  You’ve never seen a prettier sight in all your life,” recalled Bascom

In 1994, on the Shahan Ranch near Uvalde, Texas, Earl and his son John took part in the historic longhorn cattle drive over the hills and through the streets Alamo Village where actor John Wayne once roamed, commemorating the 500 years of the American longhorn.

earl4

Earls father John, and his brothers.

Bascom personally knew and talked to pioneers and homesteaders, outlaws and lawmen, gunslingers and bootleggers, prospectors and gold miners, Mormon Battalion soldiers and Civil War soldiers, Indian Chiefs and Indian War fighters, muleskinners and pony express riders, squatters and sheepherders, cattle rustlers and horse thieves.

“The life of a cowboy, I know,” Bascom said of his life which stretched from 1906 to 1995.

It’s no wonder that Earl Bascom has been called the “Cowboy of Cowboy Artists.”

The National Day of the Cowboy is a celebration for the heritage of the cowboy, promoted by a non-profit organization that works to preserve North America’s cowboy and pioneer heritage.

Being honored on the National Day of the Cowboy is a befitting tribute to one of the great cowboys of Canada and North America – Earl W. Bascom.

Canada’s Greatest Western Town: The Winner!

The votes have been tallied and Canada’s Greatest Western Town Contest has reached a fitting end (see the entire bracket of towns here), with Old Cowtown . .  aka. . . Maple Creek, Saskatchewan the final winner!

As it happens Wee and I passed through Maple Creek just a few weeks ago.

MChorses Along with these two.

I love that place. Rifts of country and cowboy woven throughout its streets.

MCwagon

Admittedly, some on the corny side.

MCcrossing

Others fun. All pose-able.

MColdpic

We studied some historic black and whites.

MCcookbook

Bought an old-time country cookbook with recipes like salted beef and jelly rolls. My mom had these identical cookie cutters. I loved seeing that.

MCstreetside

Sat street side. . . .

MCvisit

And visited with passer-bys in the heat of the afternoon. All of whom were so friendly!

Congratulations, Maple Creek, well deserved!

But especially thank-you to everyone who participated. This contest shone a light on so many remarkable western corners of our country, we look forward to covering as many as we can manage in future issues of Western Horse Review. 

 

 

Jonathan Field Giveaway

We seem to be contest-crazy lately, and this latest is a fabulous once-in-a-lifetime opportunity!

JFwithhorse

And, if you’re a fan of Jonathan Field (and who isn’t?) and Recovery EQ, this is one contest practically tailor-made for you.

Whether our horses are our teammates, our best friends, or part of the family, we take the necessary steps to make sure they are as happy and as healthy as possible. For many supplements such as RECOVERY EQ is an important part in making sure our horses perform to the best of their ability.

Designed to unlock your horse’s potential, Recovery EQ aims to provide healthy joints, circulation, and works to help fight tissue damage. This is all achieved through a unique blend of anti-oxidants from foods that have been proven to support cellular health such as green tea, and red grapes.

john2

Seeing the effect Recovery EQ has had on his own horses, proven horseman and trainer Jonathan Field personally vouches for the life changing product. The supplement has allowed him to take his horses down the road and to be confident in the fact that they are healthy and sound enough to make the journey.

john1

Now, we want to hear what Recovery EQ has done for you and your horse!  In the comment section below, please tell us about the positive effects this supplement has had on your animal in 200 words or less.

The best story will receive two VIP tickets to the Jonathan Field and Friends International Horsemanship Education Conference in September!

johnposter

Total value for this prize is $520, so get to pennin’ about your success with this fab product.

Small print: The contest will run until August 20, 2014 and the winner will be announced the following day. Prize does not include transportation to the venue. Winner must agree to have their story published in a future issue of Western Horse Review.

Canada’s Greatest Western Town: Final Two!

CGWT

Here we are – the final two!

CGWT-Bracket---FinalTwoResults-Western-Towns-Bracket

Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, also known as the Old Cowboy Town faces off against Ponoka, Alberta, a town rich in rodeo and western heritage.

The Final Two round is now underway with only two days to cast your votes and round up a posse of supporters for your town. The rules remain simple. Vote ONCE for ONE town, and your vote must be cast in the Comments section of this blog post. Get the word out by sharing our Facebook posts, or using the hashtag #greatestwesterntown. Do it soon, as voting for this round ends very quickly – midnight August 9.

Reader Survey – July/August

JULYcover2014

We would love to get your feedback on our July/August issue. To thank you for your time, we are offering a pair of Professionals Choice splint boots as a prize – we’ll randomly draw one winner from all the responses received.

The survey closes after a definitive number of responses so don’t delay. It won’t take but 5 minutes and we truly appreciate every response we receive.

Click here to take survey

(Readers and subscribers to the print or digital magazine only, please)

July/August Sneak Peek

This issue is about to hit the stands. Here’s a sneak peak of what you’re about to receive in your mailbox. (If you’re not a subscriber, you’re really missing out – subscribe here, and in the meantime look for it on your local newsstand.

JULYcover2014Our cover. Brought together by our own Dainya Sapergia, art direction by Kendra Roberts and featuring Niki Flundra and her fabulous trick horse, Ace. This talented duo will be performing at this year’s edition of the Calgary Stampede and succinctly represented on the cover, our feature piece on the Greatest Show on Earth.

spTannerByrne

Photo by Dainya Sapergia Western Lifestyle Photography

Within the Calgary Stampede feature, regular contributor Ted Stovin of Everything Cowboy takes a critical look at the rise of stand-alone rodeos such as the Calgary Stampede and the American.

spwinston

Photo by Deanna Kristensen Photography

Still within the genre, Deanna Kristensen’s interview with with this issue’s chosen maverick, produced some candid thoughts from one of the most influential rodeo producers of all time, Winston Bruce.

spshelters

Photo by Jenn Webster

Owner of the Rona store in Black Diamond, Alberta and shelter expert, Robbie McKay offers exclusive inside tips on building one.

spstemcell

Photo by Ingrid Schulz

Dr. Mike Scott, of Moore Equine, helps us decipher the real story behind stem cell therapy.

Photo by Dainya Sapergia Western Lifestyle Photography.

Photo by Dainya Sapergia Western Lifestyle Photography

Deanna Kristensen tackles the controversy behind this year’s government-driven cull of Alberta’s wild horses.

spwilljamesOne of our favourite photographers, and a true western folk herself, Mary Williams Hyde illustrates our Getaways guide to the Will James Round Up Ranch Rodeo in Hardin, Montana, with her spectacular photographs of the event.

spobie

Photo by Dainya Sapergia Western Lifestyle Photography

They say she’s an old cowboy soul in a young body. Extreme cowboy competitor, Obbie Schlom tells us about her favourite gear in this issue’s edition of Freeze Frame.

Photo by Rod Honig.

Photo by Rod Honig

Vaquero aficionado, Rod Honig takes us through a historical tour of the origin of the spur. 

spscarfslideThese nifty scarf slides by Tom Balding are just one of seven new pieces of western gear featured in our regular Magnificent Seven western product profiles.

Photo by Dainya Sapergia Western Lifestyle Photography.

Photo by Dainya Sapergia Western Lifestyle Photography

Cutting horse trainer Dustin Gonnet continues our cerebral tour through the year of a cutting horse prospect with this issue’s discussion of keeping the minds of his three-year-olds in futurity training fresh and sharp for the aged event season just around the corner.

spkirstyKirsty White discloses her own, personal favourite barrel bloodlines in our Bloodline Buzz column.

spbakoncaesar

Photo by Krista Kay Photography

A Texas-inspired recipe for rib rubs.

Amanda Brumley talks about the success of executing the runaway success of such shows as Reining By The Bay, a full recap of show scenes from the late spring, a horse called Red Hot Jade who’s taking the cow horse world by storm – just a few more hot items in the issue.

Photo by Krista Kay Photography.

Photo by Krista Kay Photography

You might think of enjoying our Wild West cocktail of the month, the Bakon Vodka Caesar, as you peruse it.

Rhubarb Upside-Down Cake

rhubarbcakeA couple of years ago, I purchased a rhubarb plant. I set it temporarily by the compost pile, while I deliberated where to plant it. It was spring. It rained for a long time. Spring turned into summer. Horses, shows and other priorities prevailed. When autumn rolled around, I guiltily pushed the dried up stalk, still in its pot, to the back of the compost pile, out of sight. Finally, sometime before winter I threw the entire plant into the compost pile, on its side, still in its pot. I was fairly certain I’d missed the successful transplanting window by a month, or season, or two.

There may be some truth to the theory that you really can’t kill rhubarb. The following spring, as I was tidying up the compost pile, there it was, on its side, bright green leaves and red stalks pushing out from the dried plant.

This time I didn’t miss the window, and since then we’ve re-discovered rhubarb as one of our favourite springtime treats.

So, good, I decided to make a rhubarb upside-down cake for Wee’s birthday. So simple. The streusel ends up on the bottom of the cake in this case, but it’s still a beautiful thing. I have trouble with upside-down cakes flipping out intact. In this case, it’s appropriate to cool the cake about 10 minutes and then flip it. Too long, and the rhubarb will get sticky.

Streusel 

1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted

1/2 cup all purpose flour

1/4 cup sugar

bit of salt

Cake

3/4 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

4 cups (or more if desired) of cut up rhubarb, tossed in enough sugar to coat it.

1 cup sugar (in addition to the sugar used for coating the rhubarb)

1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1-1/2 teaspoons of baking powder

1-1/2 teaspoons of salt

1-2 tablespoons orange juice

2 eggs

1 cup sour cream

a bit of orange zest, optional

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.

2. Butter a 9 or 10 inch round cake or pie pan (2-3 inches deep)

3. Spread the rhubarb and sugar mixture into the pan.

4. Make the streusel by crumbling together the ingredients.

5. Whisk together flour, baking powder and salt. With electric mixer, beat butter and sugar until pale and fluffy, about 3-5 minutes. Beat in zest and juice. Add eggs one at a time. Add flour in three batches and equal halves of the sour cream in between, beating until smooth. Your batter should be spreadable, add the second tablespoon of orange juice here if necessary.

Note: if you find yourself short of sour cream, you can substitute plain yogurt. Just let it sit in a strainer for 15 minutes mixed with a teaspoon of baking soda. This will give it the same consistency as the thicker sour cream.

6. Spread the batter over the rhubarb and top it off with the crumbled streusel.

7. Bake about 60 minutes. Cool for 10 minutes, run a knife around the edge, and invert onto a pretty cake plate.

rhubarbsliced

 

 

Canada’s Greatest Western Town

CGWTOur idea of West much less geographical, than it is a mindset. No matter where we live in this country it is about a life that is engaged with western culture – appreciative and honoring the land, from the cowboy tradition to current views. It’s modern, but respectful and mindful of tradition and history. It’s photography, books, gear, travel, music and food. It honors the cowboys, competitors, artisans, musicians, authors, photographers and artists who spend their lives devoted to keeping our idea of the West in Canada alive.

For most who embrace this idea it includes the horse in some respect. At home, in our pastures and barns, on the magnificent trails of this country, and certainly, in the competition arena. Also in our accruements and passions. In our appreciation of the majesty of the animal, in the subtle nuances of the horse’s work and our various sports.

One could say, in our identities.

Which is why, when we think about where to live, we think Western. And, living the Western way, recognizing its authenticity, and celebrating how it enriches our lives.

Now is your chance to help Western Horse Review unfold the real West. Many of Canada’s greatest western hotspots aren’t just great places to live in the western lifestyle: they’re Canada’s best-kept secrets. And its time we celebrated them!

THE BATTLE FOR THE GREATEST WESTERN TOWN IN CANADA IS ON!

We’ll begin this competition with a nomination period from now until June 27th.

Then the voting begins!

For this purpose the moniker “towns” can refer to towns, cities, hamlets, really, wherever there is a great gathering of western culture. So think small. Think city. Think your corner of this great country. Just keep it Western.

Send us a short (50 word or less) nomination for your western town now. E-mail it to editorial@westernhorsereview.com with the subject line of CGWT, or just go ahead and comment right here.

Remember, the nomination period ends June 27th, so be sure to get your favourite western corner of this country in on the action!