Trail Ride Sandwich

Our 5-star chef serves up the perfect sandwich for a mountain ride.

Our 5-star chef serves up the perfect sandwich for a mountain ride.

 

BY JEFF GRIMSHAW

Sandwiches built for a trail ride should have four basic components: a good quality crusty bread such as french baguette or individual rolls, a flavorful spread, a sliced meat and fresh or grilled vegetables. Try to keep it simple, too many ingredients and flavors will over-complicate taste. Avoid watery vegetables like tomato and cucumbers that will make your bread soggy.

This sandwich recipe involves a little bit of pre-preparation a day or so in advance. The creamy component for the sandwich – tangy jalapeno mayonnaise – can be made one or two days ahead. This is the flavor base for the sandwich and can also be used as a dip for veggie sticks or dressing for salad or coleslaw. The flavor will always be better the next day, once all the components have time to get to know each other a little better.

It’s no secret that leftovers make great sandwiches. If you are planning a ride, make sure to cook extra the day before. Roast beef, lamb shoulder, pork loin or chicken make excellent sandwiches and any one of them can be used in this sandwich. In this case, we roasted a shoulder of spring lamb. Roasting a lamb shoulder, contrary to popular belief, is incredibly easy. Rinse, pat dry, rub with salt and crushed chili pepper and roast long and slow in the oven.

ingredients

 

Trail Ride Sandwich
Total Time: 40 min
Prep Time: 30 min
Assembly time: 10 min
Total Servings: 6
Difficulty: Easy

Ingredients
Six crusty rolls
1 cup Jalapeno Mayonnaise (see below)
1 ½ lb roast lamb
1 head butter lettuce
1 sweet onion
Salt and pepper to taste

Sauce
Jalapeno Mayonnaise
4 jalapeno peppers
1 tbsp olive oil
I cup mayonnaise
1 lime
¼ cup cilantro
½ tsp cumin
1 tsp chili powder
Salt and pepper to taste

Bagged
Method:

1. Jalapeno Mayonnaise
Slice the jalapenos lengthwise and remove the seeds and pith. Toss in olive oil and lay cut side down on a parchment lined baking tray. Roast in a 400°F oven until the skin is golden brown and blistered. Remove from the oven and let cool.
Place mayonnaise in a mixing bowl. Coarsely chop roasted peppers and cilantro and add to bowl. On the fine side of a cheese grater, or with a zester, zest the lime and add half of the juice from the lime.
Mix in cumin and more lime juice, salt and pepper to taste.
Keep covered in the refrigerator overnight.

2. Get your ingredients together.
Cut the rolls in half, thinly slice the meat, slice the onions paper thin, wash and dry lettuce leaves.

3. Assemble sandwiches.
Distribute the jalapeno mayonnaise on the tops and bottoms of the buns.
Distribute the meat evenly and season with salt and pepper.
Carefully lay the onions on the meat, one at a time, and distribute evenly.
Next, add lettuce and cover with the bun top.

4. Wrap up the sandwiches individually or in pairs. If you want your rolls to stay crusty, wrap the sandwiches in parchment or paper bags. If you like the bread a little softer, wrap them in plastic wrap, the moisture will soften the crust of the bread as you travel.

* TIP! To keep the sandwich cool on hot days, freeze a saturated kitchen sponge in a zipper bag. The sponge won’t leak water as it thaws and you can reuse the sponge over and over again.

WEB-WHR_April_Grimshaw

Comments

  1. Yum, but I guess I’m an oddball as on trail rides or hikes I love a really good cheese and tomato sandwich.

    The secret to prevent it from becoming too soggy is to butter your bread. A crusty roll or baguette, good fresh butter (a generous portion), then the thick garden fresh tomato garnished with a bit of salt and pepper (must be between the cheese and tomato), followed by a hunk of good sharp tasty cheese, then close your sandwich. The tomato melts into the cheese as the day goes on, without melting too much into the bread thanks to the salt, but the crust remains crisp while a bit of the tomato juice does get into the bread. Nummy, satisfying, and not too heavy like I find some meat sandwiches can be. :-).

  2. Deborah Keniston says

    Just a tip for riding and eating on the trail. A friend and I took a ride, and not being sure of getting good water, brought some sodas in cans in our food bags. We dismounted to eat and drink, and being thirstier, my friend stood directly in front of the horse she was riding, faced her and popped the tab. The now warm soda shot out of the can and hit the horse directly in the chest. It was a wonder she did not bolt, leaving us to ride and tie to get home. LOL a funny memory!

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