Sept/Oct WHR available now!

Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

As if the invigorating editorial and photo journalism of the September/October issue of Western Horse Review weren’t enough, there are so many behind-the-scenes aspects that we thought we should let you in on the action!

 

In one of our competitor interviews, Louisa Murch White had the chance to speak with Kirsty White, the Canadian professional barrel racer on a consistent hot streak in 2017 with no plans of slowing down. White tells us about her go-round win at Calgary, her main mounts and a little bit about what it’s like to live a day in her life.

Then we featured Donna Wilson of the rural community around Chain Lakes, AB, and  a fourth-generation rancher who passion and main discipline is bronze artistry. Wilson says, “There is such rich imagery in the life we lead here!”

Wilson’s Anchor Bar Bronze is situated in a gallery she shares with good friend and photographer, Debra Garside in Longview, AB. From her trademark works utilizing the intricate use of antlers within a bronze, to her Longhorn cattle pieces, to the artworks that display horses and the western lifestyle, you can read about them all in our Sept/Oct issue.

Carman Pozzobon. Photo by Covy Moore.

In our Fall Run health profile, we spoke with several top professionals in our industry and asked them how they keep their mounts in top condition, during peak fall competitions. Barrel trainer Carman Pozzobon (Kamloops, BC) told us about her Equifit Nerostim Massager, while trainers Dale Clearwater (Hanley, SK) and Dustin Gonnet (Cayley, AB) open up about their feed programs and the importance of versatility in training. Reining specialist Locke Duce of High River, AB, mentions the benefits of Pulse Therapy in his daily regime. Learn their top tips and more in our in-depth piece for the final gauntlet of the show season.

Savanna Sparvier, 2017 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

On pages 42-49, we showcase the best in autumn western fashion. Shot by the talented Callaghan Creative Co., this special photojournalism piece took us from the Calgary Polo Club, to the backyard our own Sally Bishop’s in Nanton, AB, to the runways of the Vulcan Airport. We were so lucky to be joined by a group of beautiful models and authentic horse women, for this amazing feature. On the cover and in the picture above, you’ll find the stunning Savanna Sparvier, the 2017 Calgary Stampede Indian Princess.

Did we mention – we had the turquoise, coyote fur jacket (with Pendleton®️blankets) by Janine’s Custom Creations, custom-made for this issue of the magazine?

If readers could have been with us on that day they would have seen a huge crew of talented people, hustling at every location to get the models in make-up, hair and dressed for an optimal moment in front of the camera.

Stay tuned for an upcoming blog solely about on our behind-the-scenes action from the Fall Shoot!

A solar waterer. Photo by Esteban Adrogue.

In our How-To feature, we tell you about an innovative solar waterer created by Rob Palmer of Nanton, AB, that got his ranch off the grid. Even in the brunt of a cold winter, Palmer can rely on solar power to water his cows and keep his monthly service provider bills to a bare minimum.

Paul Brandt has taken his success as a musician and used it as a launching pad for many incredible philanthropic purposes.

 

We also had the chance to interview the iconic Paul Brandt in the Sept/Oct issue, the most awarded male Canadian country music artist in history. In this compelling editorial, Louisa Murch White got the chance to speak with Brandt about music, his philanthropic work and his most recent #NotInMyCity campaign.

Launched just prior to the 2017 Calgary Stampede. the #NotInMyCity campaign raises awareness about human trafficking in Calgary, AB. A tough subject to talk about and an even tougher one to fight – but Brandt feels strongly that with awareness and recognition of the serious problem in our own backyard, the public can stand together against it.

Brandt partnered together with local designer Paul Hardy to design scarves and bandannas to help raise funds for the campaign. Hardy says of his design, “…Visually, I hoped to create a motif throughout the bandana and scarf that would not only be bold from afar, but also suggest a community of friendship and a worthiness of trust for those who wear it to stand in solidarity with victims against human trafficking.”

We had the opportunity to photograph these beautiful scarves in our fall fashion shoot. Blowing in the wind, the image suggests freedom. It’s a campaign Western Horse Review supports wholeheartedly.

The #NotInMyCity scarf. Photo by Callaghan Creative Co.

 

The September/October issue of Western Horse Review is available now but with more inciteful editorial on the horizon, you don’t want to miss an issue! Get your subscriptions up to date at: http://www.westernhorsereview.com/magazine-subscription/

Speak Your Mind

*